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50

MySQL's utf8 permits only the Unicode characters that can be represented with 3 bytes in UTF-8. Here you have a character that needs 4 bytes: \xF0\x90\x8D\x83 (U+10343 GOTHIC LETTER SAUIL). If you have MySQL 5.5 or later you can change the column encoding from utf8 to utf8mb4. This encoding allows storage of characters that occupy 4 bytes in UTF-8. You may ...


33

4 byte Unicode characters aren't yet widely used, so not every application out there fully supports them. MySQL 5.5 works fine with 4 byte characters when properly configured – check if your other components can work with them as well. Here's a few other things to check out: Make sure all your tables' default character sets and text fields are converted ...


29

It's the character at the end of the tweet that's causing the problem. It looks like an 'emoji' character aka japanese smiley face but it's not displaying for me in either Chrome or Safari. There are known issues storing 4byte utf characters in some versions of MySQL. Apparently you must use utf8mb4 to represent 4 byte UTF characters, as the normal utf8 ...


23

I’ve recently written a detailed guide on how to switch from MySQL’s utf8 to utf8mb4. If you follow the steps there, everything should work correctly. Here are direct links to each individual step in the process: Step 1: Create a backup Step 2: Upgrade the MySQL server Step 3: Modify databases, tables, and columns Step 4: Check the maximum length of ...


18

MySQL's utf32 and utf8mb4 (as well as standard UTF-8) can directly store any character specified by Unicode; the former is fixed size at 4 bytes per character whereas the latter is between 1 and 4 bytes per character. utf8mb3 and the original utf8 can only store the first 65,536 codepoints, which will cover CJVK (Chinese, Japanese, Vietnam, Korean), and use ...


17

Most iOS emojis use code points above the Basic Multilingual Plane of the Unicode table. For example, 😄 (SMILING FACE WITH OPEN MOUTH AND SMILING EYES) is at U+1F604. Now, see http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/charset-unicode.html. MySQL before version 5.5 only supports UTF-8 for the BMP, which includes characters between U+0000 and U+FFFF (i.e. ...


14

MySQL only supports characters from the basic multilingual plane (0x0000 - 0xFFFF). Your character is out if this plane. Try storing a synonym instead :) Update: MySQL 5.5.3 and on (which has not gone GA yet) does support supplementary characters if you use UTF8MB4 encoding.


11

Which version of MySQL are you using? If it's before 5.5, you can't store that character because it would take four bytes and MySQL only supports up to three bytes UTF-8 (i.e., characters in the BMP). MySQL 5.5 added support for four-byte UTF-8, but you have to specify utf8mb4 as the Character Set. ref: ...


11

I'd simply guess that you are setting the table to utf8mb4, but your connection encoding is set to utf8. You have to set it to utf8mb4 as well, otherwise MySQL will convert the stored utf8mb4 data to utf8, the latter of which cannot encode "high" Unicode characters. (Yes, that's a MySQL idiosyncrasy.) On a raw MySQL connection, it will have to look like ...


9

I have searched the web for many hours and I came to this solution which I want to share for other people: Use BLOB instead of text/varchar in the database fields. Like this, you can continue to use the database tables as you did before and the Emojis are shown properly. As soon as the hoster updates the MySQL version, I will continue with using UTF8MB4 as ...


8

The following seems to work for me in Ruby 1.9.3: input.each_char.select{|c| c.bytes.count < 4 }.join('') For example: input = "hello \xF0\xA9\xB6\x98 world" # includes U+29D98 input.each_char.select{|c| c.bytes.count < 4 }.join('') # 'hello world'


7

The strings that contain \xF0 are simply characters encoded as multiple bytes using UTF-8. Although your collation is set to utf8_general_ci, I suspect that the character encoding of the database, table or even column may be different. They are independent settings. Try: ALTER TABLE database.table MODIFY COLUMN col VARCHAR(255) CHARACTER SET utf8 ...


5

utf8mb4 uses up to four bytes per character, so the name could occupy as much as 1020 bytes all by itself.


5

"\ud83d\ude04" is the JSON Unicode escape sequence for U+D83D U+DE04, which is the "surrogate pair" for the Unicode U+1F604 (SMILING FACE WITH OPEN MOUTH AND SMILING EYES). But NSJSONSerialization decodes this correctly, as can be seen in the following example: const char *jsonString = "{ \"emoji\": \"\\ud83d\\ude04\" }"; NSLog(@"JSON: %s", jsonString); ...


5

MySQL up to version 5.1 seems to only support unicode characters in the basic multilingual plane, which when encoded as utf-8 take no more than 3 bytes. From the manual on unicode support in version 5.1: MySQL 5.1 supports two character sets for storing Unicode data: ucs2, the UCS-2 encoding of the Unicode character set using 16 bits per ...


5

This should work: if (max(array_map('ord', str_split($string))) >= 240) The rational being that code points up to and including U+FFFF are encoded as three bytes of the form 1110xxxx 10xxxxxx 10xxxxxx. Higher code points are of the form 11110xxx 10xxxxxx 10xxxxxx 10xxxxxx, i.e. the highest byte has a value of 240 or higher. If there are any such bytes ...


4

If you need MySQL to support 4-byte UTF-8 characters (which is normally considered part of UTF-8), you need to use the character set utf8mb4, not utf8. utf8mb4 was first supported in MySQL 5.5.3.


4

Some emoji are encoded using 3 bytes. If your computers supports emoji, here are the 3 byte emoji: ☺❤✨❕❔✊✌✋☝☀☔☁⛄⚡☎➿✂⚽⚾⛳♠♥♣♦〽☕⛪⛺⛲⛵✈⛽⚠♨1⃣2⃣3⃣4⃣5⃣6⃣7⃣8⃣9⃣0⃣#⃣⬆⬇⬅➡↗↖↘↙◀▶⏪⏩♿㊙㊗✳✴♈♉♊♋♌♍♎♏♐♑♒♓⛎⭕❌©®™ The rest are encoded using 4 bytes and will not work unless you update mysql to utf8mb4. It sounds like you did not fully upgrade to utf8mb4 in some way.


4

I like Danask57's answer - it's correct and the 'right' way to do it. (I up voted it myself) However, another quick-and-dirty solution is to change the schema. use a varbinary or binary to store the tweet string: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/binary-varbinary.html The upside is that you won't get any character set problems. The downside is that ...


3

The utf8mb4 character set is specific to MySQL. It's explained here. The exception is because the JDBC driver doesn't recognize that charset. One solution is to convert your database encoding to utf8. Another is to use a different JDBC driver. (MySQL Connector/J 5.1.13 and up supports utf8mb4.)


3

4 byte Unicode characters aren't yet widely used, so not every application out there fully supports them. MySQL 5.5 works fine with 4 byte characters when properly configured – check if your other components can work with them as well. Here's a few other things to check out: Make sure all your tables' default character sets and text fields are converted ...


3

MySQL reserves the max amount for a UTF8 field which is 4 bytes, so that is why you are blowing past the 1000 byte limit. My recommendation is to create the varchar at less than 255 or create it without UTF8. Both of those solutions are probably not right for you or you would have already tried that. The only other solution I can think of is to split the ...


3

You can just to add to your connection-url params like: jdbc:mysql://hostname:3306/dbname?useUnicode=true&characterEncoding=utf8&characterResultSets=utf8 hostname -> may be localhost or any other host(you can specify with ip address 000.000.0.0)


3

According to here, here and here all characters that were oustide the Basic Multilinguan Plane were truncated with the old utf8 type in MySQL. Basically with utf8m4 you should be able to support even the Supplementary Multilingual Plane and even what's further.


3

Characters that require utf8mb4 are represented as a surrogate pair in Java, and occupy 2 chars. A simple way to detect them is therefore checking if the length of the string in chars is the same as the number of code points: boolean requiresMb4(String s) { int len = s.length(); return len != s.codePointCount(0, len); }


3

On my old projects, I just have a function DB::esc() that wraps whatever escape function goes to the library I'm using, be it mysql_real_escape_string or whatever else. On my new projects, I use prepared statements and let the extension handle it.


2

I had this exact issue. To solve, change the default encoding on the mysql server side to utf8mb4 following this excellent guide: http://mathiasbynens.be/notes/mysql-utf8mb4 . Remember to restart your mysqld service after making changes to the configuration file. For me, I also needed to update the mysql jdbc driver to version 5.1.18 (from version 5.1.6). ...


2

Checklist for Problems with character/charset/collation Including mysql, mysqli, PDO Content DISCLAIMER My insert's in my DB doesn't work properly! What can i do? Change Charset and Collation of a Database or Table Set the encoding of your skript files Set the charset of your page with php or meta tag What's the difference between UTF8 and UTF8mb4? ...


2

The most frequently used characters are in the BMP. The characters in higher planes are mostly rare and historic, but some of them may be in use in personal names for example. If you can use utf8mb4 you probably should.


2

The following regular expression will replace 4-byte UTF-8 characters: function replace4byte($string) { return preg_replace('%(?: \xF0[\x90-\xBF][\x80-\xBF]{2} # planes 1-3 | [\xF1-\xF3][\x80-\xBF]{3} # planes 4-15 | \xF4[\x80-\x8F][\x80-\xBF]{2} # plane 16 )%xs', '', $string); } ...



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