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4

I want to generate cryptographically secure unique uuids using php. Okay, that's easily done. uniqid() provides unique but not secure ids and openssl_random_pseudo_bytes() provides secure but not unique ids. What makes you think a cryptographically secure pseudorandom number isn't unique? /** * Return a UUID (version 4) using random bytes * ...


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REST does not really care if the UUID is generated by the server or by the client. It just needs a unique resource-identifier in form of an URI. What form the URI has, is not important to clients and servers - only that they are unique and may be obtained by clients (HATEOAS). You need of course also a resource on the server side which is able to create the ...


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UUID uuid = UUID.randomUUID(); This should generate you a random UUID for you to use how ever you wish.


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This is actually a common problem, and it is difficult to solve. While best practices usually say that different beacons should not share the same ProximityUUID/major/minor, there are sometimes legitimate edge cases where multiple beacons are transmitting the same identifiers in the same place. (At Radius Networks, for example, we put default identifiers ...


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The - combination between UUID, major and minor should be unique. There shouldn't be two beacons with the same combination, this is the beacon identifier!


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This was a bug in Windows XP and Windows Server 2003. A MAC address is 48 bits, typically represented as: 00-01-02-0A-0B-0C 00:01:02:0a:0b:0c The first three bytes represent an Organziation, the remaining three bytes are whatever numbering scheme that organization wants to use. Organization ID's are handed out by the IEEE. For all public MAC addresses, ...


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As UUID is string, you need to wrap UUID in quotes. onclick="fetchQuestion('ff8080814e6c440b014e6c464f660001', 2);return false" // ^ ^


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You need to put the value in quotes for it to be recognised as a string. onclick="fetchQuestion('ff8080814e6c440b014e6c464f660001',2);return false" Note that you should use Javascript to attach your events as it allows for a better separation of concerns. Try this: <a href="#" data-uuid="ff8080814e6c440b014e6c464f660001" ...


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That seems like one of the few legitimate uses of regular expressions. After writing a regular expression to match UUIDs (like this one), you can throw your string into preg_match, and if there are any UUIDs in it, it will find them and you can extract them.


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You can access service UUID by CBAdvertisementDataServiceUUIDsKey in advertisementData in - (void)centralManager:(CBCentralManager *)central didDiscoverPeripheral:(CBPeripheral *)peripheral advertisementData:(NSDictionary *)advertisementData RSSI:(NSNumber *)RSSI


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Hex String You can create a nil UUID from a hex string of zeros in the canonical format. java.util.UUID uuid = UUID.fromString( "00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000" ); Constructor Use the constructor taking a pair of long integers. java.util.UUID uuid = new UUID( 0L , 0L ); // Or ( 0 , 0 ) Enum You could make this handy within your Java app by ...


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There is no FIXED (publicly available) ID anymore. UUID is off limits and using the mac address isn't fixed identifierForVendor changes on reinstall but thats all you have :) EXCEPT if you want / can argue you do advertising. Then you can checkout the advertisingIdentifier [dont try to abuse it though!]


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Using an UUID is safe and secure. The linked article just says that an UUID is maybe a little too much for this kind of security. But well ... if you are "too" secure, no one will blame you. An UUID is just alpha numeric characters and dashes. So if you need to put it in a query string or an URL, you have nothing to escape. You can remove the dashes to save ...


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The following python script should do the job: from dumper import * import gdb def qdump__QUuid(d, value): this = d.makeExpression(value) stringValue = gdb.parse_and_eval("%s.toString()" % this) d.putStringValue(stringValue) d.putNumChild(0) The easiest way to use it with Qt Creator is to just paste these lines at the end of your ...


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This method keeps "uniqueness level" of UUID by one-to-one bijection of each large number to corresponding float number on interval between [1/maxUUID,1]. After removing hyphens, UUID string is a simple hex string. Convert it to BigInt and divide by maximal possible UUID-number(128 bit ff...fff). String hexUUID = UUIDstr.replaceAll('-',''); BigDecimal uuid ...


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A standard UUID is just a 128-bit value. You could map that to the unit interval via a stereographic projection. Convert the UUID to a Quadruple-precision floating point number Map the floating point number to the unit sphere using a stereographic projection. Scale the point's polar angle on the unit sphere from [0, 2 π] to [0,1] The projection ...


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You can synchronize uuid-generation method, and/or you can pregen uuid pool and generate more identificators in one thread when pool starts to deplete.


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UUID is just a number. It has no meaning except you create on the server side of an Android app. Then the client connects using that same UUID. For example, on the server side you can first run uuid = UUID.randomUUID() to generate a random number like fb36491d-7c21-40ef-9f67-a63237b5bbea. Then save that and then hard code that into your listener ...


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This doesn't work because primary keys are unconditionally being generated before the insert operation, see https://github.com/cakephp/cakephp/blob/3.0.8/src/ORM/Table.php#L1487-L1491 // ... $id = (array)$this->_newId($primary) + $keys; $primary = array_combine($primary, $id); $filteredKeys = array_filter($primary, 'strlen'); $data = $data + ...



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