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This question is quite old already and yet has no answer, so I'll throw in mine, which references a blog post from 2013-2014 by Jay Conrod who has "worked on optimizing the V8 JavaScript engine for mobile phones". V8 tries to be efficient when collecting garbage and for that it uses Incremental marking and lazy sweeping. Basically incremental marking is ...


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I don't see how it's possible, all the Code, Script, SharedFunctionInfo etc are JavaScript object specific to an isolate. You can however build a static snapshot of some V8 state and have this state always loaded by all isolates, but this cannot be dynamically for runtime. This is how what V8 builtins do.


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There is nothing keeping reference to the promise so it will be garbage collected. The promise is the only thing keeping reference to the function doMoreWork so it will be garbage collected too. How could I empirically observe this behaviour? In other words, how can I monitor what objects are being GC-ed and when? I develop purely in Node.js, if that ...


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The Promise object is collectable if it has no references pointing to it. If it is used doWork().then(...) a temporary reference is created. So until .then does not block anymore there is a reference to the object so it cannot be collected You're right, doMoreWork is also not collectible because the Promiseobject has a reference to it The statement ...


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It's because this in a Node module isn't pointing to the global object. It points to the exports of that module. This means weekDay isn't available as a global variable. // ---------v console.log(exports.weekDay.name(weekDay.number("Saturday"))); or // ---------v console.log(this.weekDay.name(weekDay.number("Saturday"))); To get a broad (and ...


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In theory, the new fill() method on typed arrays would be a natural candidate as it would fill the buffer internally at compiled speed, and therefor performance faster. Unfortunately, this isn't the case. This performance test show that, at the time of writing this, a traditional while-loop is many times faster. Even when this test has a slight penalty for ...


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I'd recomment to use the fill method of TypedArrays: var a = Uint16Array(16384).fill(65); You'll have to benchmark whether it's actually faster than the loop, but it should be optimised by the engine (maybe they haven't implemented that yet, though).


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I had the same error here with arch linux(64) In my case it was possible to ignore this error when making just the 32 bit version. -> make ia32.release you can try to add make ia32.release GYPFLAGS=-Dclang=0 if clang brings up errors Hope that helps a little bit! Cheers


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It looks like just thread for me, except that it has its own heap. is there any difference? They are orthogonal, a thread can execute multiple isolates at a time while an isolate can only be executed by one thread at a time. And of course one isolate can be executed by different threads at different times but it's probably not common. An isolate ...


-1

Isolate represents an isolated instance of the V8 engine. V8 isolates have completely separate states. Objects from one isolate must not be used in other isolates. When V8 is initialized a default isolate is implicitly created and entered. The embedder can create additional isolates and use them in parallel in multiple threads. An isolate can be entered by ...


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No need to write on change method for this kind of scenario, I have changed few lines into your code. try following. @api.one def _third_field_selection(self): t = [] if self.second_f: query = """ SELECT cadena FROM table_option_three """ self.env.cr.execute(query) t = [(row[0], row[0]) for row in ...


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There are no insurmountable technical challenges. It was just a shortcut decision made during implementation of arguments object in Crankshaft: to support only cases where arguments object materialization can be easily avoided. Even if Crankshaft supported materialization of arguments object the resulting code would still be slower than code that does not ...


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arguments is not an array, for example, consider: function abc(a) { arguments[0] = 1; console.log(a); } abc(0); The problem here is that the assignment of arguments[0] = 1 changed the value of a magically, I.E. arguments[0] aliases a. It's the same problem that eval and with causes - you can no longer statically see what variables are being ...


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The reason might be because JavaScript does not implement actual arrays in the traditional sense. Arrays are more like JavaScript objects, i.e. {}, that have a length property. The fact that arguments is not an Array was design mistake in the language. This is likely the reason why the optimizer has problems with this.


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This is not so much an answer as an historical comment: Both the HotSpot VM and the V8 js engine can have their origins traced to the Self project at Sun Microsystems, which I think prototyped a lot of the technology that allows them to run as fast as they do. Something to consider when comparing them both. I would've posted this as a comment but the ...


1

No it's not possible and I'm afraid duktape could be violating the spec unless it took some great pains to ensure it's not observable. You can store pointers in objects so to store 64-bit ints directly on an object you need pointers to have the same size: Local<FunctionTemplate> function_template = FunctionTemplate::New(isolate); // Instances of this ...


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You can't. An Expression is a piece of syntax, a JSObject is a runtime object. They have absolutely nothing to do with each other.


1

You would need to emit code that distinguishes the cases at runtime. That is not too hard, but not a completely trivial change either. Moreover, you'd also need to adapt the optimising compiler. But that's the easy part. Changing the meaning of typeof will break other parts of the system, which rely on the correct semantics. For example, all uses of the ...


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As Bergi correctly points out, the spec leaves it up to the implementation to return a date when it is not one of the standard formats. Here's how its implemented in Chromium's V8 engine: DateParser.cc if (!is_iso_date_) { if (Between(year, 0, 49)) year += 2000; else if (Between(year, 50, 99)) year += 1900; } On Chrome 41.0.2272.76 : Date.parse(0) ...


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the specs say nothing about single-character year definition The spec says: If the String does not conform to that format the function may fall back to any implementation-specific heuristics or implementation-specific date formats. For V8 specifically, see this bug report on unpredictable results when called with a single number. You can also read ...


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You need to enable gdb jit to see jitted frames. Build with gdbjit=on and then run V8 with --gdbjit flag.


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IONFLAGS=codegen js --ion-offthread-compile=off app.js You need debug build of spidermonkey. After running this you'll have code generator log in stderr. In order to find specific function search log for "Emitting code for script".


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It turns out that this code actually does work as expected. The problem was that I was using browserify before running the code, and the code (e.g. var x = 5;) was getting wrapped into a function scope.


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V8 isolates are single-threaded (only one thread can be entered into an isolate at a time and access its heap/execute its code), thus "creating a new thread" means creating a new isolate which is a very heavy-weight thing to do so you definitely wouldn't be able to do it in a response to a request anyway. You can create many v8 isolates and run them in ...


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You can do: char* buf = node::Buffer::Data(args[0]); to directly access the bytes of a Buffer.


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According to the node.js node binding documentation the 'arg[0]' value argument can be accessed as: String::AsciiValue v(args[0]->ToString());


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I've found this docs on the v8js class.


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You should be able to do something like this: function Foo() { return new (Map.bind(this, [].slice.call(arguments))); } var bar = new Foo();


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You can use J2V8 https://github.com/eclipsesource/J2V8. It's even available in Maven Central. Below is a Hello, World! program using J2V8. package com.example; import com.eclipsesource.v8.V8; public class EclipseCon_snippet5 { public static class Printer { public void print(String string) { System.out.println(string); } ...


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In V8 environments this throws an Error "Map constructor not called with 'new'". Why? Because new ES6 classes (including builtin ones) are supposed to be only constructable with new. SpiderMonkey gets this 'right' Not exactly. The spec explicitly says Map is not intended to be called as a function and will throw an exception when called in ...


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Actually, it doesn't really 'work' in FF, since FF also allows to create maps simply by calling Map(). However, according to http://kangax.github.io/compat-table/es6/ we do not have compatibility for subclassing in modern browser (fascinating enough, IE has some support here). tl;dr V8/SpiderMonkey are not fully ES6 compatible yet.


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How can javascript run synchronous in the browser and asynchronoously in Node.js enviroment? It doesn't. It runs in a single-threaded*, event-driven manner in both environments. When processing a task (e.g., responding to something that happened), that thread does things synchronously. One of the things it can do (in both environments) is schedule an ...


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Line: JSON.stringify({'str': Array(10000000).join('qweqweqweqweqweqweq')}); create new string object which contains json. Something like this: {"str":"qweqweqweqweqweqweq.........."} and now we have two strings :)


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Setting a variable to null is only necessary in certain kind of closure situations, e.g. : function createClosure(bigData) { var unrelatedVar = 1; doSomethingAsync(function theCallback(err, result) { if (bigData.matches(result)) { ... } }); return function theReturnedFunction() { return unrelatedVar++; ...


1

If you're certain that a given object is no longer needed, then setting it to null is the way to go (be aware that this does not imply that any linked objects will also be garbage-collected to). Only when all references to that given object are set to null (the object becomes inaccessible from anywhere on your code), then it will be collected. Since node.js ...


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JSDB, available for Linux, Windows, and Mac should fit the bill pretty well. It uses Mozilla's Spidermonkey Javascript engine and seems to be less of a hassle to install compared to node.js (at least last time I tried node.js a couple of years ago). I found JSDB from this interesting list of Javascript shells: ...


0

This answer may not be as specific as you would like, but I'd suggest looking at the good package that's part of Walmart's hapi.js framework. It does a great job of extending logging beyond --trace-gc. It's a process monitor that listens for one or more of the following events: ops - System and process performance - CPU, memory, disk, and other metrics. ...



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