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1

Vala is just using C's fprintf underneath, which displays these semantics. Have a look at Why does printf not flush after the call unless a newline is in the format string? You can call stdout.flush() if you want.


2

You need the development package for atspi-2. apt-get install libatspi2.0-dev In the future, you can find out which packages contain a file by searching on the packages.ubuntu.com site (or, if Elementary OS provides something, you could use that instead). There is also Debian's package search, or the apt-file command line tool. And, in case anyone from ...


0

It's hard to figure out what is going on based on the information you've provided—you're probably going to have to figure it out yourself. I'll try to include some pointers here. A good place to start would be to set the PKG_CONFIG_DEBUG_SPEW environment variable… The most likely cause is that some environment variables and/or the pkg-config being invoked ...


0

Have you tried the Vala example included in libappindicator? http://bazaar.launchpad.net/~indicator-applet-developers/libappindicator/trunk.15.10/view/head:/bindings/vala/examples/indicator-example.vala /* * Copyright 2011 Canonical Ltd. * * This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify it * under the terms of the GNU General ...


1

Your code will return an owned string, so the caller is responsible for the memory deallocation. If you call this library function from vala the compiler will make sure that it is deallocated. If you call it from C you should read the GLib documentation for g_strconcat: Concatenates all of the given strings into one long string. The returned string ...


1

As this doesn't seem possible at the moment I have reported it as a bug.


2

This isn't possible at the moment: https://bugzilla.gnome.org/show_bug.cgi?id=746704 Currently Genie only support the deprecated lambda syntax for signals (+=). This patch provides lambda support in most constructs, the only requirement is that braces and parens need to be indent-balanced on multiple line constructs.


1

The closest Vala code I could get is: int main() { var str = "ABC"; var unowned_string_array = repeat (str, 5); return 0; } public (unowned string)[] repeat (string s, int n) { var a = new (unowned string)[n]; for (var i = 0; i < n; i++) // This sadly still duplicates the string, // even though a should be an array of ...


4

return a.str will make a copy of the string using g_strdup, because by default the function result and the StringBuilder will both own a separate copy of the string after the (implicit) assignment. Since the StringBuilder stored in a will go out of scope and it's copy will thus never be used again this is not desireable / efficient in this case. Hence the ...


2

There are several things wrong with this code. [indent=4] init var carray = repeatc ('A', 3) for i in carray do stdout.printf ("%c, ", i) // A, A, A Actually, it prints "A, A, A, " (note the trailing comma and space). There are lots of ways to fix this, the easiest would just be to do something like stdout.puts (string.joinv (", ", sarray)). ...


1

The error message is diffrent from vala. Genie's error message looks like a compiler's parse problem. vala's error message is more clear. my test in vala: void main () { var h = new HashTable<string, int[]> (str_hash, str_equal); } error message: error: `int[]' is not a supported generic type argument, use `?' to box value types looks like ...


0

Using GLib.Array<T>: int main () { int[] x = {1, 2, 3}; int[] y = {4, 5, 6}; Array<int> a = new Array<int> (false, true, 0); a.append_vals (x, x.length); a.append_vals (y, y.length); // taking over ownership avoids array copying int[] z = (owned) a.data; foreach (var i in z) { stdout.printf ("%d ", ...


1

Use this function int[] array_concat(int[]a,int[]b){ int[] c = new int[a.length + b.length]; Memory.copy(c, a, a.length * sizeof(int)); Memory.copy(&c[a.length], b, b.length * sizeof(int)); return c; } Taken from: http://rosettacode.org/wiki/Array_concatenation#Vala


0

Not really an answer, but an alternative way to express this: init var h = new HashTable of string, Int? (str_hash, str_equal) h["a"] = Int ({1, 2, 3}) h["b"] = Int ({5, 6, 7}) h["a"].append ({4}) struct Int data: array of int construct (a: array of int) this.data = a def append (a: array of int) this.data = ...


1

something like this [indent=4] init var h = new HashTable of string, int (str_hash, str_equal) h["foo"] = 123 h["bar"] = 456 foo ("foo", h) def foo (key: string, hash: HashTable of string, int) // PUT HASHTABLE IN THE END if hash.contains (key) stdout.printf ("%s => %i", key, hash[key])


1

Not directly, but you can set a break point on the appropriate reference function for you object. Each object has foo_ref and foo_unref that are called to change the reference count. If you set break points on these, you can trace the reference counting.


1

The whole problem was that the SHA1 output I was using was the escaped HEX string rather than the raw binary output. Checksum cs = new Checksum(ChecksumType.SHA1); cs.update(_base.data, -1); cs.update("258EAFA5-E914-47DA-95CA-C5AB0DC85B11".data, -1); size_t len = 20; uint8[] digest = new uint8[len]; cs.get_digest(digest, ref len); string key = ...


1

Assuming you want to see the string as a list of Unicode codepoints, you can use string.get_next_char to iterate over the string one codepoint at a time. An example is in the reference. If you want graphemes, I do not know of a way to do this using GLib/Vala.



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