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75

valarray is kind of an orphan that was born in the wrong place at the wrong time. It's an attempt at optimization, fairly specifically for the machines that were used for heavy-duty math when it was written -- specifically, vector processors like the Crays. For a vector processor, what you generally wanted to do was apply a single operation to an entire ...


41

Valarrays (value arrays) are intended to bring some of the speed of Fortran to C++. You wouldn't make a valarray of pointers so the compiler can make assumptions about the code and optimise it better. (The main reason that Fortran is so fast is that there is no pointer type so there can be no pointer aliasing.) Valarrays also have classes which allow you to ...


25

During the standardization of C++98, valarray was designed to allow some sort of fast mathematical computations. However, around that time Todd Veldhuizen invented expression templates and created blitz++, and similar template-meta techniques were invented, which made valarrays pretty much obsolete before the standard was even released. IIRC, the original ...


17

valarray was supposed to let some FORTRAN vector-processing goodness rub off on C++. Somehow the necessary compiler support never really happened. The Josuttis books contains some interesting (somewhat disparaging) commentary on valarray (here and here). However, Intel now seem to be revisiting valarray in their recent compiler releases (e.g see slide ...


17

I just tried it on a Linux x86-64 system (Sandy Bridge CPU): gcc 4.5.0: double operator* 9.64185 ms valarray operator* 9.36987 ms valarray[i] operator* 9.35815 ms Intel ICC 12.0.2: double operator* 7.76757 ms valarray operator* 9.60208 ms valarray[i] operator* 7.51409 ms In both cases I just used -O3 and no other optimisation-related flags. It looks ...


14

I know valarrays have some syntactic sugar I have to say that I don't think std::valarrays have much in way of syntactic sugar. The syntax is different, but I wouldn't call the difference "sugar." The API is weird. The section on std::valarrays in The C++ Programming Language mentions this unusual API and the fact that since std::valarrays are ...


11

std::valarray<T>::operator [](std::size_t) returns a T&, which will work fine. std::valarray<T>::operator [](std::size_t) const returns a T, which will be an rvalue and consequently cannot have its address taken. Because valarray_test::pointy is itself const, valarray_test::v is treated as const and consequently the const overload of ...


11

valarray was already in C++03, array is new in C++11 valarray is variable length, array is not. valarray is designed for numeric computations and provides plenty of operations including +, -, *, cos, sin, etc... array does not. valarray has an interface to retrieve slices of the array (sub arrays), array does not.


9

Separation of concern? A vector and a valarray solve different problems. Quoting from the standard, a vector is a (§23.3.6.1 [vector.overview] p1) ... sequence container that supports random access iterators. In addition, it supports (amortized) constant time insert and erase operations at the end; insert and erase in the middle take linear time. Storage ...


8

I suspect that the reason c = a*b is so much slower than performing the operations an element at a time is that the template<class T> valarray<T> operator* (const valarray<T>&, const valarray<T>&); operator must allocate memory to put the result into, then returns that by value. Even if a "swaptimization" is used to ...


8

The problem is that comparing valarrays with == does not return a bool, it returns std::valarray<bool>, doing the comparison element-wise. If you want to compare them for equality, you can call min() on the result, since false < true: return (a*x==b).min();


5

The C++11 standard says: The valarray array classes are defined to be free of certain forms of aliasing, thus allowing operations on these classes to be optimized. See C++11 26.6.1-2.


4

valarray has the slice mechanism valarray is expected to be implemented using expression template for its numerical operators


3

To create a valarray from a vector: std:valarray<double> corpX(corps_tmp[i].data(), corps_tmp[i].size()); To write the data back into a vector: corps_tmp[i].assign(std::begin(corpX), std::end(corpX));


3

The whole point of valarray is to be fast on vector machines, which x86 machines just aren't. A good implementation on a nonvector machine should be able to match the performance that you get with something like for (i=0; i < N; ++i) c1[i] = a1[i] * b1[i]; and a bad one of course won't. Unless there is something in the hardware to expedite parallel ...


3

The class templates related to std::valarray<T> are intended to support optimizations techniques known as expression templates. I haven't tried to do this but my understanding is that the specification doesn't quite require this and also doesn't really support this sufficiently. In general std::valarray<T> is a fairly specialized class and it ...


3

You are actually trying to invoke std::valarray<double>::operator()(int) here, but no such operator exists. Presumably, you meant to use an initializer list instead: Matrix::Matrix(int width, int height) : width_(width), height_(height), storage_(width*height) { } Alternatively, you can assign a new object instance instead, but this ...


3

The comment in your quoted code says exactly that: bool allTrue = boost::numeric::promote<bool>(aaa); Or just with C++11's standard library: bool allTrue = std::all_of(begin(aaa), end(aaa), [](bool b){return b;});


3

Your third call conflicts with the constructor valarray (const T* p, size_t n);. This is because 0 is as easily convertible to the NULL pointer as it is to a double. You could fix this by explicitly stating to use a double: std::valarray< double > myArray((double)0,3)


3

Yes, this is perfectly fine. The contents of vector are guaranteed to be contiguous (see [vector.overview], §1 in C++ standard). Note that since C++11, you can initialize valarray using initializer list directly.


3

Yes, move semantics applies in the first case, because std::valarray(my_vector.data(), my_vector.size()) is an rvalue and a move assigment operator is defined for the valarray class(http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/numeric/valarray/operator%3D).


2

I typically use std::vector with my own allocator, which has the alignment as template parameter and calls _mm_malloc() or _aligned_malloc(). That works very well, also with AVX (32-byte alignment). Appropriately written templated user code automatically picks the required alignment. Below the code for the AlignmentAllocator<> and helper. tested under ...


2

What prevented you from reading the documentation? == does not work in this way for valarrays. It compares each element index-wise and returns a new valarray of bools containing each result. Indeed, the entire purpose of valarrays is to enable quick and easy operations on an ordered set of values without having to resort to writing loops everywhere.


2

valarray is a dynamic data structure, whose size can change at runtime and which performs dynamic allocation. array is a static data structure whose size is determined at compile time (and it is also an aggregate). Don't use valarray, though; just use a vector instead.


2

Yes. Make vlist_of a factory function: template <typename T> vlist_builder<T> vlist_of(std::valarray<T>& data) { return vlist_builder<T>(data); } Now it works http://liveworkspace.org/code/48aszl$0. I'd personally prefer uniform initialization: /*const*/ std::valarray<float> prefer { 2, 3, 5 }; See full sample: ...


1

The valarray type does not provide any way to use an existing array for its data store; it always makes a copy for itself. Instead of storing your data in an ordinary array, store the values directly in the valarray from the start. Call v.resize to set the size, and either assign values into it with the [] operator, or use &v[0] to get a pointer to the ...


1

I'm compiling in release x64, VS 2010. I changed your code very slightly: double* a1 = &a[0], *b1 = &b[0], *c1 = &c[0] ; double dtime=gettime_hp(); for( i=0 ; i<N ; ++i ) a1[i] *= b1[i] ; dtime=gettime_hp()-dtime; cout << "double operator* " << dtime << " ms\n" ; dtime=gettime_hp(); a *= b; ...


1

I finally got this through using delayed evaluation. The code may be ugly since I am just starting learning these c++ advanced concepts. Correct me if you have better idea please. Thanks a lot for all your assistance. Here is the code: #include <iostream> #include <valarray> #include <iostream> #include "windows.h" using namespace std ; ...


1

You don't initialize members that way. Use the initialization list of the AttackSqrs constructor: class AttackSqrs { public: AttackSqrs(); ~AttackSqrs(); private: void init(); std::valarray<int> board; std::valarray<int> vrChessPieces; std::valarray<int> vrAttackSqrs; std::valarray<int> ...


1

On the header file, you only declare the variable and their types. Any kind of object construction is implemented in the cpp file. AttackSqrs.h class AttackSqrs { public: AttackSqrs(); ~AttackSqrs(); private: void init(); std::valarray<int> board; std::valarray<int> vrChessPieces; std::valarray<int> vrAttackSqrs; ...



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