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51

The valueChangeListener will only be invoked when the form is submitted and the submitted value is different from the initial value. If you would like to submit the form during the HTML DOM change event, then you'd need to add another <f:ajax/> without a listener(!) to the input component. The <f:ajax listener> is in this construct by default ...


7

There are three problems: Your listener method call in EL is wrong. You should not pass the current component along it. Replace valueChangeListener="#{userTypeController.permissionChanged(this)}" by valueChangeListener="#{userTypeController.permissionChanged}" Your method signature in backing bean is wrong. It should conform the Java naming ...


6

for the first fragment (ajax listener attribute): The "listener" attribute of an ajax tag is a method that is called on the server side every time the ajax function happens on the client side. For instance, you could use this attribute to specify a server side function to call every time the user pressed a key but the second fragment (valueChangeListener) ...


6

Seeing how the component values are bound, I bet that it's inside a datatable. If that is indeed the case, you can use DataModel#getRowData() to obtain the current row. Add a DataModel property to the TestService bean like follows: private List<Question> questions; private DataModel<Question> questionModel; @PostConstruct public void init() { ...


5

Using valueChangeListener for this purpose has always been a hacky way. Basically, there are two ways to work around this "problem": Call FacesContext#renderResponse() so that JSF will immediately move to the render response phase and thus the update model values (and invoke action) phase will be skipped: public void loadothercombos(ValueChangeEvent ...


5

In this particular case, you could get it by evaluating the #{supplier} programmatically: public void checkBoxListener(ValueChangeEvent event) { FacesContext context = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance(); Supplier supplier = context.getApplication().evaluateExpressionGet(context, "#{supplier}", Supplier.class); // ... } However, this is plain ...


4

You're probably better off making the boolean private, and only allowing it to be changed through a setter method. The setter method, when called, should then repaint the component.


4

Is this new EventsBean().setCapital(capital);right ? No, it is not right. You're manually creating a brand new instance instead of using the one which is managed by JSF. Your instance would totally disappear once the method finishes and returns. You should instead be setting the capital in the instance which is managed by JSF. There are several ways to ...


4

It's only executed when the form is submitted, not when you change the value: So, either add a submit button and press it (you can also use <a4j:commandXxx> ones if necessary): <h:commandButton value="Submit" /> Or throw in some ajax magic to automatically submit the form on change. As you're apparently on RichFaces 3.x, use ...


3

as the valueChangeListener is invoked at the end of the VALIDATION phase, I am not getting the updated address of the Name1 field in the valueChangeListener method Queue the event to the INVOKE_ACTION phase so that it acts like as an action(listener) method. public void valueChangeListenerMethod(ValueChangeEvent event) { if (event.getPhaseId() != ...


3

The JSF valueChangeListener is in no way related to the client-side events. It is a server-side event which will be invoked when the submitted value differs from the initial value. The first item of your list has a value of 1, so when the user doesn't change the dropdown, the submitted value will be 1. If you don't want the valueChangeListener to be ...


3

Tables use a TableCellRenderer to paint values on the screen. The editors and renderers don't actually have anything to do with each other (from a painting point of view). So once the editor has been dismissed (accepted or cancelled), the cell is repainted using the assigned TableCellRenderer You need to supply, in your table model, some way to determine ...


3

You're going to do this just like a click listener on a button. np1.setOnValueChangedListener(new OnValueChangeListener() { @Override public void onValueChange(NumberPicker picker, int oldVal, int newVal) { // do something here } }); A fully working example can be found here: http://samplecodez.com/android/numberpicker.php Some ...


3

You're almost there. Call arg0.getSource() and cast it to a JList, and viola, you're there! Something like: String selection = ((JList) arg0.getSource()).getSelectedValue().toString(); result.setText(result.getText() + selection); Note, the aesthete in me insists on renaming that parameter to something prettier. public void ...


2

Apparently you're doing a redirect instead of a forward, while the bean is request scoped. A redirect creates a new request, hereby garbaging all initial request scoped attributes, including request scoped beans. It will thus cause recreation of request scoped bean with all default properties. To solve this problem, remove the <redirect/> entry from ...


2

I am not sure what you mean with "the value is not getting". You should clarify that bit more. At least, its sole purpose is to listen on a value change so that you can do some business stuff based on the change such as logging or preloading some stuff related to the new value. When the initial value equals to the submitted value, then this method won't be ...


2

This looks exactly like the kind of error you get when trying to pass a method binding into a Facelets tag. Due to some awkward design error in Facelets, this never works (something to do with only excepting values). The solution there is to pass the bean and name of the method as separate attributes. Then combine them eventually using array-style ...


2

The error is the following line in your constructor: fields = new JList(f) with that, you replace the list that is created in initComponents


2

The point of listeners is to invert the logic. You don't constantly check if a value is changed. You notify the listener when you change the value. So, instead of Foo.bar = 5, you invoke Foo.setBar(5), where in addition to the assignment, you call barListener.valueChanged(value) As a sidenote - avoid storing state in static variables.


2

Instead of giving on Change in f:selectItems component, try to give onchange="submit()" for h:selectOneMenu component and try. It should work.


2

There is no onchange attribute on f:selectItems tag. Migrate your onchange attribute to h:selectOneMenu and this should work. h:selectOneMenu is generated as HTML select tag, and f:selectItems are option tags. So onchange really should be in select tag.


2

You're confusing valueChangeListener attribute of UIInput with listener attribute of <p:ajax>/<f:ajax>. The ValueChangeEvent argument is only supported on the method behind valueChangeListener attribute. The method behind the listener attribute of <p:ajax>/<f:ajax> must take AjaxBehaviorEvent argument (or just nothing). So public ...


2

That can indeed happen if the bean is request scoped. Every HTTP request would then create a brand new bean instance. Simple as that. If you need to have the same bean instance while interacting on the same view, then it should be placed in the view scope instead. @ManagedBean @ViewScoped public class MyLdapEntry { // ... } This problem is totally ...


2

It's because your backing component extends from UIInput. The value change listener is applied to the backing component itself instead of to a child of the composite implementation. Your concrete functional requirement isn't exactly clear, but based on the information provided so far, you can safely replace extends UIInput implements NamingContainer by ...


2

Need to add listener to textfield. Add following snippet and it should work. deg.getDocument().addDocumentListener(new DocumentListener() { public void changedUpdate(DocumentEvent e) { convert(); } public void removeUpdate(DocumentEvent e) { convert(); } public void insertUpdate(DocumentEvent e) { convert(); } ...


2

The problem is with your selectItems tag. <f:selectItems value="#{employee.locationInMap}" /> You cann't intialize entire map to selectOneMenu tag. just try with entryset as below: <f:selectItems value="#{bean.locationInMap.entrySet()}" var="entry" itemValue="#{entry.key}" itemLabel="#{entry.value}" /> You can find more information on ...


1

You can use the f:attribute tag to send any data to the ValueChangeListener: <h:selectOneRadio value="#{test.answer}" valueChangeListener="#{TestService.changeanswer}" immediate="true" id="answer"> <f:attribute name="myattribute" value="#{test.questionid}" /> <f:selectItem itemValue="A" ...


1

The ValueChanged-Event, as the name implies, will only be fired when the Value of the DateTimePicker changes. You do not have to check if the value has changed in your code. You are stating that you EventArgs is null, but it should be EventArgs.Empty, when used in an unmodified framework. If you want to do something else with the LastValue you can use a ...


1

Are you sure you didn't actually add the ValueChangeHandler multiple times?


1

You don't set a listener on a field in Java, you set it on a property. While properties (according to the JavaBeans spec) can be fields, they're usually done as pairs of methods (one getter, one setter; the latter being not needed for read-only fields) as that lets you hook extra logic in to be called when the property is accessed. Such as firing a listener ...



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