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9

Change your last snippet to System.out.println((a = b) & (a = c)); The assignment operator (=) has lower precedence than the boolean logical AND operator (&). Use parentheses to explicitly group your expressions.


8

When the value types are more interesting, say, a std::vector<T>, for example, it may make more sense to std::swap() a temporarily constructed object into place rather than assigning it: given that the temporary result is about to go away, avoiding an assignment and just changing pointers makes some sense. I don't see any reason to do something like ...


6

It doesn't make much sense to shift bits around in a float or double considering what the bits represent. Bit 63 (the bit that is selected by the mask 0x8000000000000000L) represents the sign of the floating-point number. Bits 62-52 (the bits that are selected by the mask 0x7ff0000000000000L) represent the exponent. Bits 51-0 (the bits that are selected ...


6

You should pass $array in the foreach loop by reference too, like &$array. Demo


5

From the Java Language Specification It is a compile-time error if the type of each of the operands of a shift operator, after unary numeric promotion, is not a primitive integral type. You cannot apply any of the shift operators to floating point type primitive values.


5

This is because = has a lower priority than & (which, by the way, is a boolean operator in your snippets and not a bitwise operator; it is the same as && except that it does not short circuit). Therefore your expression reads (with parens): a = (b & a) = c But you can't assign c to b & a.


5

Dynamic arrays are reference types. Which means that you have simply swapped references. The contents of the arrays are not copied. Key to being able to answer this sort of question yourself is an understanding of what it means to be a reference type. In the case of a dynamic array, the variable of dynamic array type holds a reference to the array. That is ...


4

In your pastebin, the line row[i] = int(... is indented using four spaces and four tabs. Even though the line appears to have the same indentation as the line prior to it, it's actually indented one less when interpreted by Python. Don't intermix tabs and spaces; use only one or the other. The prevailing style is to use only spaces.


4

Your code Command* commandStruct = (Command*) malloc(sizeof(commandStruct)); Is under allocating space. You're allocating enough space to store a pointer to a Command rather than a Command itself. Try replacing this with Command* commandStruct = malloc(sizeof(*commandStruct)); That should give you enough space. You're also under allocating space for ...


4

There is no such thing as a "negative unsigned int". Unsigned int is always positive. Your -someint produces the value 0 if someint = 0, and UINT_MAX + 1 - someint otherwise according to the C rules. Use instead double x = - (double) someint;


3

They do the same thing, but the first is easier to read and doesn't require an if statement. x = true; //x is now true if(!x) x = true; //x is true if x wasn't true, if x was true before it is still true


3

if (!x) x = true; does not guarantee that x will be true at the end of the statement. This is because another thread might set x to false between your testing it and bypassing the assignment. To be safe, set x = true, which will be faster anyway. Technically, if (!x) x = true; is not atomic in Java, but x = true is.


3

Yes you can do this Please check below code >>> a = 1 >>> def test(b): ... return b*10 ... >>> c = a or test(2) >>> c 1 >>> a = 0 >>> c = a or test(2) >>> c 20


3

Floating-point types are inherently signed, so >>>= would make little sense for float or double. If you can't use / by a power of 2, then you have a big problem.


2

As you said, an if statement is what you need. There is no conditional operator that doesn't assign when null. An if is most suitable in this case (not everything has to be a oneliner). The best options: if(a == null) { a = b; } Or: a = a ?? b; In fact, I believe that the latter is optimized away as a simple if statement. Assigning a to itself ...


2

if you're concerned about doing this all in a single statement, you're out of luck - C# doesn't have this functionality at the linguistic level and doesn't support operator declaration (as does F#) or overloading of the assignment operator (as does C++). There are, however, a couple of options, if none quite as elegant as you requested. The if statement, as ...


2

The brute force way to do what you seem to be trying to do is: CHECKSEC=$(which checksec 2>/dev/null || which checksec.sh 2>/dev/null || ls /usr/local/bin/checksec 2>/dev/null || ls /usr/local/bin/checksec.sh 2>/dev/null ) It isn't particularly elegant, but it should do the job. Using $(…) in place ...


1

In order to create a "negative" double from an unsigned int you must first negate as an integer and cast to double (either by bitwise negation or changing signs): #include <stdio.h> int main () { unsigned int x = 44231; /* unsigned number */ int i = ~x; /* bitwise not gives negative */ double d = ...


1

This looks for "not_this", "ls" and "nor_that" in $PATH and /usr/local/bin. "ls" should be found. #!/bin/bash locate_cmd() { which "$1" || ls /usr/local/bin/"$1" 2>/dev/null } c=`locate_cmd not_this` || c=`locate_cmd ls` || c=`locate_cmd nor_that` || echo nope echo cmd=$c


1

As a single statement, var result = ((a == null) ? (a = b) : null); The value of result can then be discarded. Having a and b as object properties, and adding a Console.WriteLine() on the setting for a will show that it is only assigned to when it was previously null. The only thing that stops it being perfectly clean is that a throwaway variable result ...


1

Having run into this situation myself, I decided to check my code where I deal with this. I tend to have two solutions, both involving the null coalescing operator. Case 1: Initialization. Using your values from above, this becomes: object a = null ?? something; Obviously, I wouldn't write that line of code (resharper would complain if nothing else). But ...


1

To clear up your confusion, when Shopify renders a template (including snippets) it is acting on information server-side. Setting a cookie is a client-side action. Therefore you cannot influence Liquid rendering with a cookie. If you want to include a snippet based on a cookie you should render the results of the snippet into DOM (perhaps hidden as a ...


1

Please don't use a name of a libray for the name of a variable. 'time' is definitly a libray. If you want to use global variables in a function (and don't get the 'referenced before assignment'-error ;-) ) write global name_of_variable in your code at the beginning of the function (see Using global variables in a function other than the one that created ...


1

When you do test_2 = test_1 you are making test_2 point to the list pointed by test_1. You could do instead: >>> test_2 = test_1.copy()


1

This is expected behavior. Python lists pass by reference. This means that when you assign a list, instead of making a copy of the list and assigning this new list to the new variable, it has both variables point at the same underlying list. This can be useful in a lot of cases. But it seems like you want to actually copy the list. To do so, do the ...


1

Store the result, and use a switch: $s = 0; if (conditionOne) { $s += 1; } if ($conditionTwo) { $s += 10; } switch ($s) { case 0: $foo = 'four'; break; case 1: $foo = 'two'; break; case 10: $foo = 'three'; break; case 11: $foo = 'one'; break; }


1

Although the syntax is verbose (a==null?()=>a=b:(Action)(()=>{}))(); Let's break it apart ( // Expression starts here a == null // If a == null... ? () => a = b // return lambda that assigns a = b : (Action) ( // Else return next lambda casted as Action () => ...


1

Not really a problem with assign and more with behavior of the paste function. This will build a variable name with a space in it: assign(paste(SubNameString, j), LoopVar) #simple example > assign(paste("v", 1), "test") > `v 1` [1] "test" ,,,, so you need to get its value by putting backticks around its name so the space is not misinterpreted as a ...


1

You can use a combination of fieldnames and cell2struct to programmatically build up a struct with the same value in all fields, and then do full-struct assignment. function out = setAllFields(s, value) %SETALLFIELDS Build a scalar struct from template, replacing all field values % Where s is your template struct, and value is the value desired in all ...



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