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297

int* arr[8]; // An array of int pointers. int (*arr)[8]; // A pointer to an array of integers The third one is same as the first. The general rule is operator precedence. It can get even much more complex as function pointers come into the picture.


212

Use the cdecl program, as suggested by K&R. $ cdecl Type `help' or `?' for help cdecl> explain int* arr1[8]; declare arr1 as array 8 of pointer to int cdecl> explain int (*arr2)[8] declare arr2 as pointer to array 8 of int cdecl> explain int *(arr3[8]) declare arr3 as array 8 of pointer to int cdecl> It works the other way too. cdecl> ...


155

Stack space for local variables is usually allocated in function scope. So no stack pointer adjustment happens inside the loop, just assigning 4 to var. Therefore these two snippets have the same overhead.


153

This comes in useful when you have global variables. You declare the existence of global variables in a header, so that each source file that includes the header knows about it, but you only need to “define” it once in one of your source files. To clarify, using extern int x; tells the compiler that an object of type int called x exists ...


132

Why not just do this: var = None Python is dynamic, so you don't need to declare things; they exist automatically in the first scope where they're assigned. So, all you need is a regular old assignment statement as above. This is nice, because you'll never end up with an uninitialized variable. But be careful -- this doesn't mean that you won't end up ...


122

Your guess as to the intent of || {} is pretty close. This particular pattern when seen at the top of files is used to create a namespace, i.e. a named object under which functions and variables can be created without unduly polluting the global object. The reason why it's used is so that if you have two (or more) files: var MY_NAMESPACE = MY_NAMESPACE || ...


107

This is excellent practice. By creating variables inside loops, you ensure their scope is restricted to inside the loop. It cannot be referenced nor called outside of the loop. This way: If the name of the variable is a bit "generic" (like "i"), there is no risk to mix it with another variable of same name somewhere later in your code (can also be ...


90

I don't know if it has an official name, but I call it the Right-Left Thingy(TM). Start at the variable, then go right, and left, and right...and so on. int* arr1[8]; arr1 is an array of 8 pointers to integers. int (*arr2)[8]; arr2 is a pointer (the parenthesis block the right-left) to an array of 8 integers. int *(arr3[8]); arr3 is an array of 8 ...


85

For primitive types and POD types, it makes no difference. The compiler will allocate the stack space for the variable at the beginning of the function and deallocate it when the function returns in both cases. For non-POD class types that have non-trivial constructors, it WILL make a difference -- in that case, putting the variable outside the loop will ...


71

I think you already hinted at the issue. What should the compiler do with this code? if (!((1 == 0) && (bool a = false))) { // what is "a" initialized to? The "&&" operator is a short-circuit logical AND. That means that if the first part (1==0) turns out to be false, then the second part (bool a = false) should be not be evaluated ...


61

The condition in an if or while statement can be either an expression, or a single variable declaration (with initialisation). Your second and third examples are neither valid expressions, nor valid declarations, since a declaration can't form part of an expression. While it would be useful to be able to write code like your third example, it would require ...


61

The syntax simply doesn't allow it. §6.8.1 Labeled Statements: labeled-statement: identifier : statement case constant-expression : statement default : statement Note that there is no clause that allows for a "labeled declaration". It's just not part of the language. You can trivially work around this, of course, with an empty statement. ...


58

They are both the same, and here's how you can find out, by looking at what the compiler does (even without optimisation set to high): Look at what the compiler (gcc 4.0) does to your simple examples: 1.c: main(){ int var; while(int i < 100) { var = 4; } } gcc -S 1.c 1.s: _main: pushl %ebp movl %esp, %ebp subl $24, %esp movl $0, -...


51

x is defined at the left of =. so in x[x], [x] refer to the global one, whereas in x = x;, x hides the global x and initializes from itself -> UB.


49

The fact that this rule is applicable in your case is not deliberate: It's ultimately a result of keeping the grammar simple. There is no incentive to prohibit declarations such as yours, but there are great disincentives to complicate rules, especially if those are intricate as they are. In short, if you don't want to use this needlessly obfuscated syntax, ...


47

When we designed the feature I asked the community what var x = 1, y = 1.2; should mean. The question and answers are here: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2006/06/26/what-are-the-semantics-of-multiple-implicitly-typed-declarations-part-one.aspx http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2006/06/27/what-are-the-semantics-of-multiple-...


45

How about this... double GetTheNumber() { // get the important number from somewhere } And then elsewhere... var theNumber = GetTheNumber(); DoSomethingImportant(theNumber / 5); And then, at some point in the future, somebody notices that GetTheNumber only ever returns whole numbers so refactors it to return int rather than double. Bang! No ...


45

It is useful when you share a variable between a few modules. You define it in one module, and use extern in the others. For example: in file1.cpp: int global_int = 1; in file2.cpp: extern int global_int; //in some function cout << "global_int = " << global_int;


42

The C standard says A declaration other than a static_assert declaration shall declare at least a declarator (other than the parameters of a function or the members of a structure or union), a tag, or the members of an enumeration. C++ says In a simple-declaration, the optional init-declarator-list can be omitted only when declaring a class (Clause ...


41

Long story short; goto will result is a runtime jump, variable definition/declaration will result in storage allocation, compile time. The compiler will see and decide on how much storage to allocate for an int, it will also make so that this allocated storage will be set to 3 when "hitting" i = 3;. That memory location will be there even if there is a ...


38

Yes, that is prohibited. Just as otherwise you cannot declare variables of differing types in one declaration statement (edit: modulo the declarator modifiers that @MrLister mentions). You can declare structs for (struct { int a = 0; short b = 0; } d; d.a < 10; ++d.a, ++d.b ) {} C++03 code: for (struct { int a; short b; } d = { 0, 0 }; d.a < 10; ++...


37

You can declare a variable in the if statement in C++ but it is restricted to be used with direct initialization and it needs to convert to a Boolean value: if (int i = f()) { ... } C++ doesn't have anything which could be described as "declaration expression", i.e. [sub-] expressions declaring a variable. Actually, I just looked up the clause in the ...


37

The rule for prohibiting non-static members is in 7.1.6.4 clause 4: The auto type-specifier can also be used in declaring a variable in the condition of a selection statement (6.4) or an iteration statement (6.5), in the type-specifier-seq in the new-type-id or type-id of a new-expression (5.3.4), in a for-range-declaration, and in declaring a ...


35

When you declare a new variable, its name becomes visible right here int x = // ^- there because it is at that point the variable is fully declared, and as such; its name means something. At this point in time any other (previously declared variable) in a surrounding scope will be hidden.


34

It's just another point of possible confusion for the programmer and the compiler. For example this is fine: double i = 2, j = 3.4; but what does this mean? var i = 2, j = 3.4; With syntactic sugar this kind of thing is a headache no one needs--so I doubt your case would ever be supported. It involves too much of the compiler trying to be a little bit ...


30

I'd heartily recommend that you read Other languages have "variables" (I added it as a related link) – in two minutes you'll know that Python has "names", not "variables". val = None # ... if val is None: val = any_object


30

I remember quoting this in a previous answer but I can't find it at the moment. C++03 §3.3.1/1: The point of declaration for a name is immediately after its complete declarator (clause 8) and before its initializer (if any), ... Therefore the variable c is usable even before the initializer part. Edit: Sorry, you asked about C specifically; though I'...


30

You can declare a session variable in this way : SET @myvarname := 'value'; or a local variable in this way : DECLARE my_variable varchar(30)


28

Your code is illegal (i.e. erroneous, ill-formed, constraint-violating) in both C and C++. The reason you get a "warning" in one language and "error" in another is just a quirk of your compiler and your compiler setup. After all, neither language really formally differentiates between "warnings" and "errors". GCC under its default settings just happens to be ...


28

This is actually a fairly interesting question. It's not as simple as it looks at first. For reference, I'm going to be basing this off of the latest C11 language grammar defined in N1570 I guess the counter-intuitive part of the question is: if this is correct C: if (a == 1) { int b = 10; } then why is this not also correct C? if (a == 1) int b = ...



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