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77

The trick is to use type classes. In the case of printf, the key is the PrintfType type class. It does not expose any methods, but the important part is in the types anyway. class PrintfType r printf :: PrintfType r => String -> r So printf has an overloaded return type. In the trivial case, we have no extra arguments, so we need to be able to ...


60

The C and C++ standard do not have any requirement on how it has to work. A complying compiler may well decide to emit chained lists, std::stack<boost::any> or even magical pony dust (as per Xeo) under the hood. However, it is usually implemented as follows, even though transformations like inlining or passing arguments in the CPU registers may not ...


52

The trick is to make a type class for which you will define an instance for functions, and an instance for the return type. The fact that it's a Bool is not a problem at all. We're trying to write a function which takes a variadic argument and returns a Bool, so we'll define a type class with such a function. class Stmt a where tautology :: a -> ...


48

the problem is that you cannot use 'printf' with va_args. You must use vprintf if you are using variable argument lists. vprint, vsprintf, vfprintf, etc. (there are also 'safe' versions in Microsoft's C runtime that will prevent buffer overruns, etc.) You sample works as follows: void myprintf(char* fmt, ...) { va_list args; va_start(args,fmt); ...


48

The key points of printf is the ability to either return a String or a function. Copied from http://www.haskell.org/ghc/docs/6.12.2/html/libraries/base-4.2.0.1/src/Text-Printf.html, printf :: (PrintfType r) => String -> r printf fmts = spr fmts [] class PrintfType t where spr :: String -> [UPrintf] -> t instance (IsChar c) => PrintfType ...


40

You can't, you can only pass the arguments as a va_list. See the comp.lang.c FAQ. In general, if you're writing variadic functions (that is, functions which take a variable number of arguments) in C, you should write two versions of each function: one which takes an ellipsis (...), and one which takes a va_list. The version taking an ellipsis should call ...


35

initWithFormat:arguments: NSString *estr(NSString *format, ...) { va_list args; va_start(args, format); NSString *s = [[[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:format arguments:args] autorelease]; va_end(args); return s; } they don't seem to have a convenience constructor "stringWith..." version


33

If by variadic arguments you mean the ellipses (as in void foo(...)), then those are made more or less obsolete by variadic templates rather than by initializer lists - there still could be some use cases for the ellipses when working with SFINAE to implement (for instance) type traits, or for C compatibility, but I will talk about ordinary use cases here. ...


30

To determine which method should be called, the compiler goes through the following list, as detailed in the JLS #5.3 and JLS #15.12.2: an identity conversion (§5.1.1) => method1(int a, int b) a widening primitive conversion (§5.1.2) a widening reference conversion (§5.1.5) a boxing conversion (§5.1.7) optionally followed by widening reference conversion ...


27

Just write this: const int n = sizeof...(T); //you may use `constexpr` instead of `const` Note that n is a constant expression (i.e known at compile-time), which means you may use it where constant expression is needed, such as: std::array<int, n> a; //array of n elements std::array<int, 2*n> b; //array of (2*n) elements auto middle = ...


24

I think you need the same syntax as when you do perfect forwarding : template <class... Args> void apply(OPAQUE* object, const char* fmt_string, Args&&... args) { C_API_Function_Call(object, fmt_string, Convert(std::forward<Arg>(args))...); } The ellipsis ... can be placed at the right of an expression containing the argument pack, ...


23

If it is a collection (A subclass of IEnumerable<T>) one could easily use the functions in the System.Linq library int min = new int[] {2,3,4,8}.Min(); furthermore it's easy to implement these methods on your own: public static class Maths { public static T Min<T> (params T[] vals) { return vals.Min(); } public static T ...


21

Parameters of functions that correspond to ... are promoted before passing to your variadic function. char and short are promoted to int, float is promoted to double, etc. 6.5.2.2.7 The ellipsis notation in a function prototype declarator causes argument type conversion to stop after the last declared parameter. The default argument promotions are ...


18

Have a look at the params keyword


18

The best thing would be to use an initializer list class GenericNode { public: GenericNode(std::initializer_list<GenericNode*> inputs) :inputs_(inputs) {} //well that's easy private: std::vector<GenericNode*> inputs_; }; int main() { GenericNode* ptr; GenericNode node{ptr, ptr, ptr, ptr}; } //compilation at ...


17

Declare the last argument as a managed array prefixed with an ellipsis. Here is a variable argument function that just passes all of its arguments to String::Format String ^FormatAString(String ^format, ...array<Object^> ^args) { return String::Format(format, args); } And here is how to call it: Console::WriteLine(FormatAString(L"{0} {1} {2}.", ...


17

An idiomatic translation for this: typedef void (*function_t)(char *format, ...); function_t Function; Function = (function_t)0x00477123; Is this: type TFunction = procedure(Format: PAnsiChar) cdecl varargs; var Function: TFunction; // ... Function := TFunction($00477123); The 'cdecl varargs' is required to get the C calling convention (where the ...


16

I think the problem is that the variadic function template is only considered declared after you specified its return type so that sum in decltype can never refer to the variadic function template itself. But I'm not sure whether this is a GCC bug or C++0x simply doesn't allow this. My guess is that C++0x doesn't allow a "recursive" call in the ...


16

OK. Yes. Definitely, by threading a numeric type around the recursive instances. First, some boilerplate: {-# LANGUAGE FunctionalDependencies #-} {-# LANGUAGE MultiParamTypeClasses #-} {-# LANGUAGE EmptyDataDecls #-} {-# LANGUAGE FlexibleInstances #-} {-# LANGUAGE FlexibleContexts #-} {-# LANGUAGE ScopedTypeVariables #-} Your nats: ...


16

It is hard to give a static type to the apply function, since its type depends on the type of the (possibly heterogeneous) list argument. There are at least two one ways to write this function in Haskell that I can think of: Using reflection We can defer type checking of the application until runtime: import Data.Dynamic import Data.Typeable apply :: ...


16

In C++03, you have different possibilities: generate overloads for 0-N arguments (using Boost.Preprocessor for example) use Cons-Lists (cons(1)("some string")(foo)) use object and overload some operator (operator() for example, or operator% like Boost.Format) The first option is a bit tricky, I feel, because not everyone can understand macros easily, so ...


16

Variadic functions receive the arguments as a slice of the type. In this case your function receives a []interface{} named args. When you pass that argument to fmt.Sprintf, you are passing it as a single argument of type []interface{}. What you really want is to pass each value in args as a separate argument (the same way you received them). To do this you ...


15

It is straight forward to write a function with variadic templates, that accept an arbitrary number of arguments. The only difference to the general pattern is, that a concrete type is used as first argument (head) - instead of a template parameter. The following example shows a function foobar, that accepts an arbitrary number of strings. // used for end ...


13

You need to use the :_* syntax which means "treat this sequence as a sequence"! Otherwise, your sequence of n items will be treated as a sequence of 1 item (which will be your sequence of n items). def funcWhichTakesSeq(seq: Any*) = println(seq.length + ": " + seq) val seq = List(1, 2, 3) funcWhichTakesSeq(seq) //1: Array(List(1, 2, 3)) -i.e. a Seq ...


13

Here are the different ways to write a properly constrained constructor template, in increasing order of complexity and corresponding increasing order of feature-richness and decreasing order of number of gotchas. This particular form of EnableIf will be used but this is an implementation detail that doesn't change the essence of the techniques that are ...


12

Writing generic code in C without using macros isn't the easiest thing to do. For a (very) basic solution using a variadic macro: #define CALL_AND_CHECK(f, r, ...) \ do { \ if (f(__VA_ARGS__) != r) \ { ...


12

No problem: class Funk a where truth :: a -> [Bool] instance (IsBool a) => Funk [a] where truth = map toBool instance Funk Bool where truth = \x -> [x] instance (IsBool a, Funk b) => Funk (a -> b) where truth f = concat [truth (f $ fromBool True), truth (f $ fromBool False)] class IsBool a where ...


12

In Scheme you can use the dot notation for declaring a procedure that receives a variable number of arguments (also known as varargs or variadic function): (define (procedure . args) ...) Inside procedure, args will be a list with the zero or more arguments passed; call it like this: (procedure "a" "b" "c") As pointed out by @Arafinwe, here's the ...


12

The problem is that {1, 1} is not an expression and has no type. Since it has no type, it cannot be deduced into the template argument list. Neither of them are correct, because the issue has nothing to do with the number of arguments provided.


11

You can just accept the arguments by the variadic template and let typechecking check the validity later on when they are converted. You can check convertibility on the function interface level though, to make use of overload resolution for rejecting outright wrong arguments for example, by using SFINAE template<typename R, typename...> struct fst { ...



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