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234

With params you can call your method like this: addTwoEach(1, 2, 3, 4, 5); Without params, you can’t. Additionally, you can call the method with an array as a parameter in both cases: addTwoEach(new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 }); That is, params allows you to use a shortcut when calling the method. Unrelated, you can drastically shorten your method: ...


188

C99 way, also supported by VC++ compiler. #define FOO(fmt, ...) printf(fmt, ##__VA_ARGS__)


81

If you don't have a function analogous to vfprintf that takes a va_list instead of a variable number of arguments, you can't do it. See http://c-faq.com/varargs/handoff.html.


66

I read answers and comments and I see that few things weren't mentioned: data.frame uses list(...) version. Fragment of the code: object <- as.list(substitute(list(...)))[-1L] mrn <- is.null(row.names) x <- list(...) object is used to do some magic with column names, but x is used to create final data.frame. For use of unevaluated ... argument ...


50

I usually use this macro to find a number of params: #define NUMARGS(...) (sizeof((int[]){__VA_ARGS__})/sizeof(int)) Full example: #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> #include <stdarg.h> #define NUMARGS(...) (sizeof((int[]){__VA_ARGS__})/sizeof(int)) #define SUM(...) (sum(NUMARGS(__VA_ARGS__), __VA_ARGS__)) void sum(int numargs, ...


44

Using params allows you to call the function with no arguments. Without params: static public int addTwoEach(int[] args) { int sum = 0; foreach (var item in args) { sum += item + 2; } return sum; } addtwoEach(); // throws an error Compare with params: static public int addTwoEach(params int[] ...


40

You can't do this, at least not in the way you're wanting to do it. What you want to do (pass on the variable arguments) requires having an initializer on UIAlertView that accepts a va_list. There isn't one. However, you can use the addButtonWithTitle: method: + (void)showWithTitle:(NSString *)title message:(NSString *)message ...


39

Here is my homework of the day, it's based on macro tricks and today I particularly learnt about __VA_NARG__ invented by Laurent Deniau. Anyway, the following sample code works up to 8 fields for the sake of clarity. Just extend the code by duplicating if you need more (this is because the preprocessor doesn't feature recursion, as it reads the file only ...


33

This is actually compiler dependent, and not supported by any standard. Here however you have a macro implementation that does the count: #define PP_NARG(...) \ PP_NARG_(__VA_ARGS__,PP_RSEQ_N()) #define PP_NARG_(...) \ PP_ARG_N(__VA_ARGS__) #define PP_ARG_N( \ _1, _2, _3, _4, _5, _6, _7, _8, _9,_10, \ ...


28

C99 supports macros with variadic arguments; depending on your compiler, you might be able to declare a macro that does what you want: #define my_printf(format, ...) \ do { \ fprintf(stderr, "Calling printf with fmt %s\n", format); \ some_other_variadac_function(format, ##__VA_ARGS__); \ } while(0) In general, though, the best ...


26

At the risk of earning an archaeologist badge, I think there is a minor improvement to Gregory's answer above using the technique from Overloading Macro on Number of Arguments With foo.h: // Make a FOREACH macro #define FE_1(WHAT, X) WHAT(X) #define FE_2(WHAT, X, ...) WHAT(X)FE_1(WHAT, __VA_ARGS__) #define FE_3(WHAT, X, ...) WHAT(X)FE_2(WHAT, __VA_ARGS__) ...


26

A possible solution is to make the parameter type a container that can be initialized by a brace initializer list, such as std::initializer_list<int> or std::vector<int>. For example: #include <iostream> #include <initializer_list> void func(std::initializer_list<int> a_args) { for (auto i: a_args) std::cout << i ...


24

Not directly, however it is common (and you will find almost universally the case in the standard library) for variadic functions to come in pairs with a varargs style alternative function. e.g. printf/vprintf The v... functions take a va_list parameter, the implementation of which is often done with compiler specific 'macro magic', but you are guaranteed ...


24

Visual C++ 2010 does not support variadic templates.


22

Try uncurryN from the tuple package. Like all forms of overloading, it's implemented using type classes. In this case by manually spelling out the instances up to 15-tuples, which should be more than enough. Variadic functions are also possible using type classes. One example of this is Text.Printf. In this case, it's done by structural induction on the ...


20

Every JavaScript function is really just another "object" (object in the JavaScript sense), and comes with an apply method (see Mozilla's documentation). You can thus do something like this.... b = function(some, parameter, list) { ... } a = function(some, longer, parameter, list) { // ... Do some work... // Convert the arguments object into an ...


19

Just to add to Shane and Dirk's responses: it is interesting to compare get_list_from_ellipsis1 <- function(...) { list(...) } get_list_from_ellipsis1(a = 1:10, b = 2:20) # returns a list of integer vectors $a [1] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 $b [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 with get_list_from_ellipsis2 <- ...


18

You can convert the ellipsis into a list with list(), and then perform your operations on it: > test.func <- function(...) { lapply(list(...), class) } > test.func(a="b", b=1) $a [1] "character" $b [1] "numeric" So your get_list_from_ellipsis function is nothing more than list. A valid use case for this is in cases where you want to pass in an ...


17

__VA_ARGS__ is the standard way to do it. Don't use compiler-specific hacks if you don't have to. I'm really annoyed that I can't comment on the original post. In any case, C++ is not a superset of C. It is really silly to compile your C code with a C++ compiler. Don't do what Donny Don't does.


17

Here is a possible solution: #include <type_traits> template<typename E> using is_scoped_enum = std::integral_constant< bool, std::is_enum<E>::value && !std::is_convertible<E, int>::value>; The solution exploits a difference in behavior between scoped and unscoped enumerations specified in Paragraph 7.2/9 of ...


16

You can use various recursive macro techniques to do things with variadic macros. For example, you can define a NUM_ARGS macro that counts the number of arguments to a variadic macro: #define _NUM_ARGS(X100, X99, X98, X97, X96, X95, X94, X93, X92, X91, X90, X89, X88, X87, X86, X85, X84, X83, X82, X81, X80, X79, X78, X77, X76, X75, X74, X73, X72, X71, X70, ...


16

For the number of arguments constraint you can easily check if sizeof...(Args) == N but for checking if all the arguments are doubles you need to build a recursive type trait that checks std::is_same for each of the arguments. template<typename...> struct are_same : std::true_type {}; template<typename T> struct are_same<T> : ...


15

I don't think that's possible, you could fake it with double parens ... just as long you don't need the arguments individually. #define macro(ARGS) some_complicated (whatever ARGS) // ... macro((a,b,c)) macro((d,e))


15

Here a solution I learned a few days ago. The simplified version that attends your question is: #define ENUM_MACRO(name, v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7)\ enum name { v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7};\ const char *name##Strings[] = { #v1, #v2, #v3, #v4, #v5, #v6, #v7}; ENUM_MACRO(Week, Sun, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, Sat); But you can have an improved ...


15

The advantage is that boost::any is way more type-safe than void*. E.g. int i = 5; void* p = &i; static_cast<double*>(p); //Compiler doesn't complain. Undefined Behavior. boost::any a; a = i; boost::any_cast<double>(a); //throws, which is good As to your comment, you cannot dynamic_cast from a void*. You can dynamic_cast only from ...


15

In Scheme you can use the dot notation for declaring a procedure that receives a variable number of arguments (also known as varargs or variadic function): (define (procedure . args) ...) Inside procedure, args will be a list with the zero or more arguments passed; call it like this: (procedure "a" "b" "c") As pointed out by @Arafinwe, here's the ...


15

This looks like a bug to me, GCC 4.8.0 and GCC 4.7.2 seem to be affected. Clang 3.2 and GCC 4.6.3 agree that the first call to something is the correct one and I really fail to see how GCC 4.7.2+ can consider the second call to be acceptable. I'd say: Report a bug against GCC. Update: I added a minimalistic example to the GCC bug report, just to help ...


15

I am not sure what your intention is but instead of storing it in a std::function you can use the lambda itself to capture the params. This is an example discussed on the boost mailing list. It is used in the boost::hana implementation auto list = [](auto ...xs) { return [=](auto access) { return access(xs...); }; }; auto head = [](auto xs) { ...


14

You can use an array to bridge compile-time and runtime: (ab)use variadic templates to statically initialize the array elements, and then index into the array with the runtime parameter. The tricky part is finding the right element type for the array. In addition since we need the template to be variadic on the tuple indices rather than on the tuple elements ...


13

You can't use the same va_list twice, nor get it twice. You have to use va_copy(): va_list ap, ap2; va_start(ap, fmt); va_copy(ap2, ap); // ... with ap // ... with ap2 va_end(ap2); va_end(ap); On some systems, __va_copy() is available instead; you may want to use #ifdef for that. If you use glib, it does that for you using G_VA_COPY().



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