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16

For the number of arguments constraint you can easily check if sizeof...(Args) == N but for checking if all the arguments are doubles you need to build a recursive type trait that checks std::is_same for each of the arguments. template<typename...> struct are_same : std::true_type {}; template<typename T> struct are_same<T> : ...


11

This is an expected warning, if we look at the document for -Wformat-security it says: -Wformat-security If -Wformat is specified, also warn about uses of format functions that represent possible security problems. At present, this warns about calls to printf and scanf functions where the format string is not a string literal and there are no ...


11

Your implementation of divide basically expands to the following: divide(20, 2, 2) -> return 20 / divide(2,2) -> return 20 / 1 You'll either want to divide from left to right like so: template<class first_t, class second_t, class... rest_t> double divide(const first_t& first, const second_t& second, const rest_t&... rest) { return ...


8

Let's try to answer your questions one by one: I think it is variadic constructor. You are correct. Does the C++ standard says that constructor can be variadic? IANALL, but, I think so. Why not? Constructor is just a (member) function. What is the use of such constructor? Like any other variadic function - to pass a variable number of ...


6

Here's a version that removes the function from the overload set, instead of giving a static_assert. This is allows you to provide other overloads of the function that could be used when the types aren't all the same, rather than a fatal static_assert that can't be avoided. #include <type_traits> template<typename... T> struct all_same : ...


6

Disambiguate using a second template argument: template<typename T> void hash_queue(queue<size_t>& q){ q.push( typeid(T).hash_code() ); } template<typename T, typename U, typename... Ts> void hash_queue(queue<size_t>& q){ hash_queue<U, Ts...>(q); hash_queue<T>(q); }


6

In my opinion Person* person = binarySearch (people, "Tom", [](Person* p, int n, char c) {return p->getName(n,c);}, [](const std::string& x, const std::string& y) {return x.compare(y) < 0;}, 5, 'a'); is a horrible syntax. Your binarySearch function is resposible for way too many things. But first, what went wrong: Your ambiguous error ...


5

It's also possible to not use recursion at all, and instead pack expand into a std::initializer_list and then push into the queue with a loop. template<typename... Ts> void hash_queue(queue<size_t>& q){ std::initializer_list<size_t> hash_codes = {typeid(Ts).hash_code()...}; for(auto h : hash_codes) q.push( h ); } Or even ...


5

Can you please try this ? #define _build_args(args,f,...) eval(f,build_args(args,__VA_ARGS__)) #define EVAL(f...) _build_args(args,f,args_end) It seems to work on my side because : EVAL(f,a) EVAL(f,a,b) EVAL(f) EVAL(f,EVAL(g,a)) gives : eval(f,build_args(args,a,args_end)) eval(f,build_args(args,a,b,args_end)) eval(f,build_args(args,args_end)) ...


5

This is a simple fix. Replace Derived with Derived::template Derived. template <std::size_t R, std::size_t... Is> struct Derived<R, Is...> : public RemoveLast<Derived, R, Is...>::type { virtual void foo() const override {RemoveLast<Derived::template Derived, R, Is...>::type::foo();} }; ::Derived works too. This appears to be a ...


4

You can't use a ternary operator for this - that requires two expressions that have a common type. No dice here. I know of no way of conditionally returning a different type based on a runtime comparison. You'd have to conditionally forward the type to a different function, by way of just introducing another helper function that builds up the Args... and a ...


4

You can't append just part of an HTML element to the innerHTML value, because the browser immediately attempts to parse it and will ignore anything malformed. Accumulate the content into a simple JavaScript variable and then set .innerHTML when you're done with the whole thing.


3

The issue is that your std::vector stores function pointers. It doesn't store std::bind objects, it doesn't store member functions, it doesn't store functors and it doesn't store lambdas. You are trying to add a lambda to it, hence the failure. If you want to store any kind of object which supports calling with the correct argument and return types, you ...


3

You need a helper: template<int... Seq> void call(int c, std::integer_sequence<int, Seq...>){ zip<Seq...>::expand(c); } void call(int c){ call(c, std::make_integer_sequence<int, 3>()); }


3

The simplest way to do this is by nesting std::array: #include<array> template<class T, size_t size, size_t... sizes> struct ArrayImpl { using type = std::array<typename ArrayImpl<T, sizes...>::type, size>; }; template<class T, size_t size> struct ArrayImpl<T, size> { using type = std::array<T, size>; }; ...


3

When you override a method, the signature must be the same. You can't "invent" a new signature. public override MyType DoSomething(params Object[] objs) { // do something } There is nothing you can do here... So you have to decide what signature you want your method to have, and use it. You could even keep both signatures in the MyClass<T>


3

This feels like an XY problem, so I don't know if this well help you, but: As @Renzo commented, if you do not need to do this at run time, it might be cleaner and faster to use a macro to do it at compile time. I don't understand why you need a get-function-variadic that returns functions that are... not variadic. However I suppose you could use ...


3

In P99 I have two macros #define P00_ARG( \ _1, _2, _3, _4, _5, _6, _7, _8, \ _9, _10, _11, _12, _13, _14, _15, _16, \ ... etc ... \ _153, _154, _155, _156, _157, _158, _159, \ ...) ...


3

As suggested here, "variadic functions can expose type-safety problems in some languages." Although Ada does not support variadic functions, the example seen here mimics the behavior using operator overloading in an array aggregate. The risk posed by a variadic parameter list typically lies in allowing raw input data to be passed directly to executable code. ...


3

I would build the string and then add it to innerHTML. var board = document.getElementById("board"); var html = ''; html += "<form id='" + arguments[0] + "'>"; for (var i = 1; i < arguments.length; i++) { html += "<input type='"; var variable = arguments[i]; html += variable.val.constructor.name + "' name='"; html += ...


3

If you are using C++11, and you need the value as a C++ compile-time constant, a very elegant solution is this: #include <tuple> #define MACRO(...) \ std::cout << "num args: " \ << std:tuple_size<decltype(std::make_tuple(__VA_ARGS__))>::value \ << std::endl; Please note: the counting happens entirely at compile ...


3

In C99, variadic functions use stdarg(3) operations (generally implemented as macros expanding to compiler-specific magical stuff, e.g. GCC builtins). The first arguments should have some fixed known type, and generally determinates how the other arguments are fetched; in several today's ABIs, variadic function argument passing don't use registers so is less ...


3

[temp.deduct.call]/1 Template argument deduction is done by comparing each function template parameter type (call it P) with the type of the corresponding argument of the call (call it A) as described below. If removing references and cv-qualifiers from P gives std::initializer_list<P'> for some P' and the argument is an initializer list (8.5.4), ...


3

The trick is realizing that the sequence you get from each "generation" procedure is already sorted, and the problem reduces to merging several sorted lists. For simplicity, I made A, Pack and P empty structs. template <int...> class A {}; template <typename...> struct Pack {}; template <int...> struct P {}; Generate a pack of As from ...


3

apply mapv should help: user=> (defn add-coords [& args] (when (seq args) (apply mapv + args))) in action user=> (add-coords [1 2 3] [1 2 3] [1 2 3]) [3 6 9]


2

Parameter packs can be empty. As a result, the compiler can't distinguish between template <typename T> void copy(const Variant& v); // with T = T and template <typename T, typename...types> void copy(const Variant& v); // with T = T, types = empty pack The fix is to make the second version match only two or more template ...


2

You can't overload class templates. You can partially specialize them, but there's no need to do that here. Borrowing @Columbo's bool_pack trick: template<bool...> struct bool_pack; template<bool... b> using all_true = std::is_same<bool_pack<true, b...>, bool_pack<b..., true>>; template <typename... OArgs> class conv{ ...


2

First, value_type doesn't need typename - I'm fairly sure the grammar actually bans it. Second, you are expanding idx too early, and also incorrectly attempting to expand keys in the declaration. (That second ... is actually being parsed as a C-style varargs.) You are also not expanding the pack keys in the function body. Assuming that you want find<2, ...


2

foo is a family of overloads, and so the foo is ambiguous. (even foo<int, int> is, as it may have additional type too). You may force expected type function as follow: template <std::size_t... Is> struct Foo<std::index_sequence<Is...>> { template <typename Container> static void execute (const Container& v, void ...


2

You can't do what you want in C++11 or C++14 in an easy way. Concepts might give us something, but for now your template arguments must be either a type, a class template, or a value. In your case, you want a pack of Signals which can only be specified as: template <typename... Sigs> class Emitter; Within the class, you can then use static_assert to ...



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