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11

The first question I'd need to ask is why, and I'd be leading the conversation in the direction of "Do you really need to port it off of VMS". There are a number of things worth mentioning about VMS: -> VMS is still actively developed and maintained by HP. They just release V8.4 for Field Test last week (see http://h71000.www7.hp.com/openvmsft/). -> ...


6

A few classic books covering the 6502; complete text online: Machine Language For Beginners (1983) The Second Book Of Machine Language (1984) Assembly Language Programming for the Atari Computers (1984)


6

Everything written on VMS uses lots of VMS specific stuff it was just so convenient. There are a few companies that sell compatibility libs to make the port easier - they wont be cheap though, VMS tended to be used where reliability mattered more than cost. The other option is to run openVMS on some modern hardware, possibly in a VM.


3

I am sure Brian has made his decision by now, but for my sins of working for many years in DEC OpenVMS language support (yes, some people had this dubious honour) the real question I would have asked a customer such as Brian is: is it a real-time application or not? If it is the former, then it would be heavily dependent on many VMS system services which ...


3

This page lists the following platforms that T have been ported to: Ultrix (vax) Apollo Domain/OS (m68k) HP/UX (m68k) Mac/AUX (m68k) NeXT (m68k) SunOS 3 (m68k) SunOS 4 and above / Solaris (sparc) Encore Multimax (n32k) DEC3100 (pmax mips) SGI Iris (mips) Unix on the Connection Machine 5 (sparc) The same page provides a Sparc image, so I'd look for a ...


3

If you're willing to keep running VMS in a VM, you can look into CHARON-VAX ( http://www.charon-vax.com/ ). As previously mentioned, the ease of porting really depends a lot on how much of the VMS extensions were used; searching the source code for $ characters embedded in strings (usually with a 3-character leading substring, such as lib$gettime or ...


3

You have several choices. Get the OpenVMS source, and continue to maintain Open VMS as if it were a Linux distribution. Some folks don't mind keeping up with Linux distributions and OpenVMS distributions. It can be done. Try to recompile the VMS C into Linux. This can be trivial if the C used only standard libraries. This can be very, very difficult if ...


2

According to this page and this page, the VAX and x86 both use little-endian byte order. So no conversion should be needed.


2

Knuths The art of Computer Programming provides examples in MIX or MMIX, a hypothetical assembly language. The Art of Computer Programming (when it's finished) will be quite thorough!


2

All of the waits except one have to do with memory swapping or thread swapping. The VAX architecture had virtual addressing. A program could access up to 1 gigabyte of address space, which was huge in 1977. If I remember correctly, 32 or 64 megabytes of memory was the standard. This meant that programs could access more memory than the machine actually ...


1

Brian, I'm not sure if LMS specified/cared to port C-code or the WHOLE process. As too often people think of languages out of scope of systems. If there're was a process built on VMS, most likely it used at least scheduling/batch facilities, which are often scripted in DCL (rather simple and clear language, unlike shell or perl scripting). So the cost of ...


1

You're not sending a signal to the process -- you're instructing the queue manager to delete the process, which it does. I think the easiest way to do what you want is to use Perl to send the signal. Submit your job as before and use: $ show system/batch to find the pid of the job. You'll see something like this when the queue manager has assigned an ...


1

If it ain't broke, don't fix it! Why port it or migrate the app if you don't have to? Why not run it on a current install of OpenVMS running on an HP Itanium server; that is assuming you wish to upgrade the hardware, which may not even be necessary if your VAX hardware is still running strong.


1

You would need to locate some seriously old Oracle distribution. Oracle release 7.3.4 is the highest Oracle release supported on VAX; Oracle releases 9.2 and later do not support connecting with Oracle7. Oracle 7.3.4 may or might not connect to 11G express. I doubt it. For sure anything above 9i was never supported. See Metalink ( 207303.1 ?) Here is a ...


1

About a year and a half later, maybe you've already figured out what to do. My organization has recently decided to stick with OpenVMS instead of switching to Linux even though the old guard recently left. We just couldn't argue with what we felt was a very stable and reliable system. We are currently switching from Alpha servers to Integrity servers for ...


1

Chiming in on the "burning" subject, hopefully not too late. Indeed power supplies for VAX'es, or whole VAX'es are still available on after market, often on ebay. Another VAX or alpha should be able to mount the volume locally. The disk volume (ODS2 filesystem) itself is unlikely to be recognized under Windows, maybe could be mounted in linux, but with an ...


1

Contact your local DECUS group. Odds are that someone may let you mount the disk, and pull the data off of it.


1

I would also look at the 6809 and 68000 chip set assembly for "cleaner design" based on what I programmed on back then in assembler. To go further, I actually found the IBM 360/670 set of assembler to be quite easy to code. Specific texts - look for some old text books for that if you want to get a pretty good grounding in register management etc. I ...


1

To learn C, you might as well drag it from the horse's mouth: "The C Programming Language" by its inventors, Kernighan and Ritchie. I can recommend "The UNIX programming environment" by (again) Brian Kernighan; a more authoritative source you'll hardly find, and it teaches you both Unix/C idioms and a bit of C programming at the same time. For more depth ...


1

I always try to write programs as much as possible in the language the company mainly uses. It makes no sense to resort to a scripting language (because it is a fragment easier) if there are six programmers sitting doing C++ in the company, increasing the language requirements on the next hire. Personally I resent Perl because, well, the syntax is slightly ...


1

Given that it is only 1500 lines of code, and that while Pascal had many virtues I/O was not one of them, I would port the whole thing to C, breaking it up into modules and writing some unit tests along the way. Porting to a new Pascal there's a big 'unknown factor' in just how compatible the different dialects are. If you port it to C you'll know by the ...



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