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37

For taking advantage of LINQ, you need 3.5 (unless you want to use LINQBridge with 2.0). For a smaller installer, .Net 3.5 Sp1 has a new feature called "Client Profile". The .NET Framework Client Profile setup contains just those assemblies and files in the .NET Framework that are typically used for client application scenarios. For example: it includes ...


24

VisualStudio offers (or at least offered) a wizard to do a conversion from VB6 to VB.NET (which could then be converted to C# with a bit of work, possibly helped by #develop's VB.NET <-> C# converter), but when last I used it, for anything non-trivial there was a lot of manual work needing to be done so I suspect you're probably better rewriting or ...


22

As far as the migration over to .NET goes, better late than never! As far as my advice goes, your mileage may vary, it's worth every penny you're paying for it! I personally believe you are making the correct choice. The first instinct for VB developers is to switch to VB.NET. That sounds entirely reasonable, but in my opinion, it's the wrong choice. ...


20

I've done a LOT of VB6 in the past, and a lot of C/C++, and when our big .NET migration happened I had no doubts that C# was the way to go. Having said that, what the VB6 guys should really be learning is .NET, and the CLR (a proper object-oriented runtime rather than a dumb COM front-end), and not a syntax. Focus on that, and sidestep the religious war.


19

It turns out that the migration tool has something, but it wouldn't do any good at runtime. Here's what I did (if the hard-coded value in the extension method were changed to the value for points per inch it would work as a point converter too): 1 Twip = 1/1440th of an inch. The .NET Graphics object has a method DpiX and DpiY which can be used to determine ...


19

You are better off with a straight rewrite.


17

I had to go through the same thing (Massive VB6 app with no documentation and horrible code.). The only safe and reasonable route you can take is number 3. To improve something you must first understand it. If you take route 1 or 2 you are guaranteed to be left with a horrible mess. Remember to always keep the idea in the back of your mind that your end ...


14

Nope, there's nothing around it really, although Windows 7 can still run DOS programs, so it's not like their programs will be un-runnable. The biggest problem they will run into is no new support or new features, and a shrinking community of knowledge on the subject. My company is currently running programs in Fortran, Clipper, VB6, and FoxPro to name a ...


11

I think you should just be able to add the library that contains your VB6 type as a reference in your C# project. Visual Studio will create an Interop Assembly on the fly, and you'll get access to all of the types in the VB6 library via Runtime Callable Wrappers. The tool that creates the Interop Assembly is TLBIMP.EXE, and you can run this yourself if you ...


11

It might come across as a little bit cheeky but your brain might be the best tool to use. Could be worth the re-write. Maybe you don't need to porting it. Could the VB6 be turned into a COM component? Port to COM, call from C#, home in time for Judge Judy.


10

The OpenForms property returns a FormCollection. You can iterate through the collection to process all forms. For each f as Form in My.Application.OpenForms f.Close() Next


10

Does the code absolutely have to be migrated? If it doesn't, still serves it's purpose, and is halfway maintainable, just leave it alone and move on. Your motivation to move the code to a newer language will soon fade after countless hours, weeks, and months of code migration -- especially on the scale that you mentioned. The idea of code migration is a ...


10

It certainly hasn't in 2008 and I'd be very surprised if it's any different in 2010. VB6 and VB.net are totally different languages, and MS has never officially endorsed an automatic migration route for anything beyond simple applications. The migration path is non-trivial. There are several companies around that offer migration services, I haven't tried ...


10

The formatting routine that VB6 uses is actually built into the operating system. Oleaut32.dll, the VarFormat() function. It's been around for 15 years and will be around for ever, considering how much code relies on it. Trying to translate the formatting strings to a .NET composite formatting string is a hopeless task. Just use the OS function. Here's ...


10

Class_Initialize is an event that gets always gets invoked as soon as an instance of the class is instantiated. It's not really comparable to a C# constructor. For example, notice the Class_Initialize is created as Private, whereas a C# class with a private constructor cannot be instantiated. While you can change a VB6 Class_Initialize event from Private ...


10

Even if you're working with c#, you can use all classes and methods provided by Vb.Net, including GetObject. Just add a reference to the .NET Component "Microsoft.VisualBasic". Once you have added the reference, you are able to call Microsoft.VisualBasic.Interaction.CreateObject() or Microsoft.VisualBasic.Interaction.GetObject()


10

Step #6 is wrong. .NET assemblies with [ComVisible] types are registered with Regasm.exe. Use the /codebase command line option if you don't want to install the DLL into the GAC. The /tlb command line option creates the type library, you can use that in your VB6 project.


10

My VB6 is a bit rusty, but if I recall, you're trying to add 21 days. So here's what you want to do: tAvailableDate = DateTime.Now.AddDays(21); UPDATE You mentioned that you converted the variable to a DateTime from a string. If you need to get it back to a string (which it looks like you might from another comment), then you want to call: ...


10

DateAdd is an old VB6 method that was carried over into VB.NET for backwards compatibility. You could get it to work in C# as well if you included the Microsoft.VisualBasic namespace in your C# project, but I wouldn't recommend using the method in C# or VB.NET. Here's how you should be doing it (it's easier to read too): tAvailableDate = ...


9

Yes - arrays are (generally) 0 based in VB6 The exceptions to this are when the explicit Dim someArray(1 To 10) as Int syntax has been used, or when Option Base 1 is declared at the top of the code module. It's Collections that aren't - when you loop through Collection objects I'm pretty sure that they are 1 based.


9

The old VB Like operator, despite appearances, is not a regular expression interface. It's more of a glob pattern matcher. See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/swf8kaxw.aspx In your example: Like "*[!0-9A-Z]*" Matches strings that start and end with any character (zero or more), then doesn't match an alphanumeric character somewhere in the middle. ...


9

I was able to accomplish the task with the following steps: Created a new VB6 Active X Control Project. Copied and pasted the entire contents of the VB6 form controls and code behind into the new control. There are several elements that have to be handled in switching to a control: you lose the ability to display the caption of the form in the previous ...


9

The core language is so different, that I would have to say start from scratch, and copy only the complicated code bits. If you start from scratch you won't have to deal with all the VB6 problems, while utilizing all the C# power. VB6 has no real classes or OOP, which makes very different from C#. Also, there is very little control on the event manager ...


9

The documentation is accurate: Your example: Dim a(100,5,4) is the same as (*) Dim a(0 To 100, 0 To 5, 0 To 4) UBound(a,1) returns the highest available subscript of the first dimension, which is 100 (there are actually 101 elements, indexed from 0 to 100). (*) Actually in VB6 and VBA you can override the default lower bound using the Option Base ...


8

I think the fastest would be to convert it to VB.net. Check the following question for this answer VB6 to VB.net conversion ans then converting it to c#. But I feel converting manually will be the better option as you can re engineer the application and may be make it simpler.


8

Experienced similar migrating 14 year old code to VS2008 Here are some tips: Remove dependancies on 3rd party components. Consider staged migration e.g. using reverse interop. Colours and Fonts need to be dealt with by hand. Watch out for uninitialised objects in arrays after migration to .NET Change On error to Try Catch Make use of ...


8

The use of Microsoft.VisualBasic from C# and VB.NET has been discussed thoroughly under this question. The Microsoft.VisualBasic namespace is fully supported, and will be around as long as .Net is around. There's no reason to avoid it. EDIT: It's telling that at the time of typing, the other answers for this question are an incorrect reimplementation of ...


8

I have done what you've been asked. In my case it was an (amateur) bowling tournament mgmt system: Member database mgmt (personal info, IRS/Winnings info, mailing lists etc etc etc) , tournament mgmt (player assignments, scoring, lane ticket generation, check register for winnings and side-pots, etc etc etc) as well as IRS EDI generation for all winners in a ...


8

Well of course the very next thing I tried fixed the problem. Defining the structure like this: <Runtime.InteropServices.StructLayout(Runtime.InteropServices.LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack:=1)> _ Public Structure TVA_PARAMETERS Public iStandardFilterOnOff As Integer ... etc. fixed the problem.


8

That's known as a "fixed-length" string. There isn't an exact equivalent in VB.NET. Edit: Well, OK, there's VBFixedStringAttribute, but I'm pretty sure that exists solely so that automated migration tools can more easily convert VB6 code to VB.NET for you, and it's not really the ".NET way" to do things. Also see the warnings in the article for details ...



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