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The answer is that they DO NOT store vertex names, only indices. If you bind a different VBO to the same index in a different VAO, you must re-bind the first VBO again before any glDraw call that uses the first VAO. At least on my Macbook Pro with: Renderer: NVidia GeForce GT 650M OpenGL Engine Version: 4.1 NVIDIA-10.0.43 310.41.05f01


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Yes, you can (or even should?) use VBOs to draw 2D graphics. What I mostly use in my 2D rendering is following: I have shader that takes in vertex coordinates (VBO), UV coordinates (VBO), texture map and ModelView matrix. I have centered "unit box", simple 1x1 (from (-0.5, -0.5) to (0.5, 0.5)) rectangle made from 2 triangles, with UV coordinates (0, 0) - ...


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"Current" state is to blame here, particularly in relation to glVertexAttribPointer. All calls to glVertexAttribPointer (...) establish memory pointers relative to the Buffer Object currently bound to GL_ARRAY_BUFFER. We tend to call a Buffer Object that is bound to that location a Vertex Buffer Object, but in reality a single Buffer Object can be used for ...


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You need to move the vertex attrib code (setting and enabling) to your draw function after you bind the buffer. These calls will act on your currently bound buffer. If you use different vaos for different models the attrib data will be stored in the vao and you will not need to rebind the attribs (just change vao) each time you draw a new object.


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(I'm assuming here that you're animating vertices individually instead of using bones or something. The situation with bones would be similar.) The problem is, having a full copy of the VBO for each frame is a ton of memory. Ideally what you'd want to have is a list of keyframes that each have time, vertices that are animated by the keyframe as a list of ...


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Considering you're a new person with 1 rep, have an upvote. Nicely written question :). I am not sure if I should be using shaders for this or not, but part of me is questioning why it is hard to move a 3D model in world space? Is there a messy way that is easier to implement for a temporary basis? A simple glTranslatef() call should suffice to move an ...


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You could use Instanced rendering: https://www.opengl.org/sdk/docs/man/html/glDrawArraysInstanced.xhtml or https://www.opengl.org/sdk/docs/man3/xhtml/glDrawElementsInstanced.xml you can create a VBO filled with all the transformation matrices for each index. set the divisor to four so that the matrix changes after four vertices have been sent: ...


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This was indeed due to some GL state being left over, specifically a glVertexAttribPointer. The reason I didn't catch it was because it was an order of operations problem directly within the 3d engine itself: child objects were being iterated (and rendered) before some state was cleared up. (Apologies, this was a tediously project-specific issue)


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According to the documentation Attribute bindings do not go into effect until glLinkProgram is called You seem to link only once and that appears to be before you call genAttribList which is the function that calls glBindAttribLocation. So, use glLinkProgram again at the end of genAttribList would be my suggestion.


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Firstly a VBO is just a collection of vertices that is stored in your video card memory. You can use a single VBO and model matrix to transform it, you can also apply different shaders and textures on top of it. This is best explained with a 2D game in mind where every graphic is basically a quad; 4 vertices. Would you really need to flood your video card ...



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