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16

This page offers details on getting gcc to automatically vectorize loops, including a few examples: http://gcc.gnu.org/projects/tree-ssa/vectorization.html In summary, the following options will work for x86 chips with SSE2, giving a log of loops that have been vectorized: gcc -O2 -ftree-vectorize -msse2 -ftree-vectorizer-verbose=5 Note that -msse is ...


12

Auto vectorization never worked out well for me. To me it seems like auto-vectorization only works for very trivial loops at the moment. I use the pragma/intrinsic approach and take a look at the assembly. If the compiler generates bad code (like spilling SSE registes onto the stack or adding redundant moves) I use inline assembler for the whole loop body. ...


10

If you have two __m256d vectors x1 and x2 that each contain four doubles that you want to horizontally sum, you could do: __m256d x1, x2; // calculate 4 two-element horizontal sums: // lower 64 bits contain x1[0] + x1[1] // next 64 bits contain x2[0] + x2[1] // next 64 bits contain x1[2] + x1[3] // next 64 bits contain x2[2] + x2[3] __m256d sum = ...


6

There is a gimple (an Intermediate Representation of GCC) pass pass_vectorize. This pass will enable auto-vectorization at gimple level. For enabling autovectorization (GCC V4.4.0), we need to following steps: Mention the number of words in a vector as per target architecture. This can be done by defining the macro UNITS_PER_SIMD_WORD. The vector modes ...


5

I have yet to see either GCC or Intel C++ automatically vectorize anything but very simple loops, even when given the code of algorithms that can (and were, after I manually rewrote them using SSE intrinsics) be vectorized. Part of this is being conservative - especially when faced with possible pointer aliasing, it can be very difficult for a C/C++ ...


5

I don't think you can do much better than 4 instructions: 2 shuffles and 2 comparisons. __m256d x = ...; // input __m128d y = _mm256_extractf128_pd(x, 1); // extract x[2], and x[3] __m128d m1 = _mm_max_pd(x, y); // m1[0] = max(x[0], x[2]), m1[1] = max(x[1], x[3]) __m128d m2 = _mm_permute_pd(m1, 1); // set m2[0] = m1[1], m2[1] = m1[0] __m128d m = ...


3

If you want just the sum, and a bit of scalar code is acceptable: __m256d x; __m256d s = _mm256_hadd_pd(x,x); return ((double*)&s)[0] + ((double*)&s)[2];


3

In a functional language, everything is dataflow. You can use functions as your module concept. To address each of your use-cases: A pluggagble module is a Clojure function that takes a single argument that is the state of your data vector. e.g. (def module-a some-function) To allow for easy extension by modules, I suggest using a Clojure map as your ...


3

I would never rely on automatic vectorization from any compiler. With gcc I would be doubly wary because the effects of gcc's optimizations always vary from version to version. Almost everyone I know who relies on special optimizations or gcc extensions has to deal with breakage when a new gcc version is released. You can usually trust pragmas and ...


2

The Mono project, the Open Source alternative to Microsoft's Silverlight project, has added objects that use SIMD instructions. While not a compiler, the Mono CLR is the first managed code system to generate vector operations natively.


2

IBM's xlc can auto-vectorize C and C++ to some extent as well.


2

Checkout conduit. http://intensivesystems.net/tutorials/conduit-motive.html


1

Assuming the following, that you have a __m256d vector containing 4 packed doubles and you would like to calculate the sum of its components, ie a0, a1, a2, a3 is each double component you would like a0 + a1 + a2 + a3 then heres another AVX solution: // goal to calculate a0 + a1 + a2 + a3 __m256d values = _mm256_set_pd(23211.24, -123.421, 1224.123, ...


1

The general way of doing this for a vector v1 = [A, B, C, D] is Permute v1 to v2 = [C, D, A, B] (swap 0th and 2nd elements, and 1st and 3rd ones) Take the max; i.e. v3 = max(v1,v2). You now have [max(A,C), max(B,D), max(A,C), max(B,D)] Permute v3 to v4, swapping the 0th and 1st elements, and the 2nd and 3rd ones. Take the max again, i.e. v5 = max(v3,v4). ...


1

Even though this is an old thread, I though I'd add to this list - Visual Studio 11 will also have auto vectorisation.


1

VectorC can do this too. You can also specify all target CPU so that it takes advantage of different instruction sets (e.g. MMX, SIMD, SIMD2,...)


1

I've yet to see an automatic vectorizer that does more good than harm.


1

Actually, in many cases GCC used to be quite worse than ICC for automatic code vectorization, I don't know if it recently improved enough, but I doubt it.


1

It is hard to use in any business logic, but gives speed ups when you are processing volumes of data in the same way. Good example is sound/video processing where you apply the same operation to every sample/pixel. I have used VisualDSP for this, and you had to check the results after compiling - if it is really used where it should.



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