Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

914

Upon further analysis of this, I believe this is (at least partially) caused by data alignment of the four pointers. This will cause some level of cache bank/way conflicts. If I've guessed correctly on how you are allocating your arrays, they are likely to be aligned to the page line. This means that all your accesses in each loop will fall on the same ...


100

OK, the right answer definitely has to do something with the CPU cache. But to use the cache argument can be quite difficult, especially without data. There are many answers, that led to a lot of discussion, but let's face it: Cache issues can be very complex and are not one dimensional. They depend heavily on the size of the data, so my question was ...


53

The function match works on vectors : > x <- sample(1:10) > x [1] 4 5 9 3 8 1 6 10 7 2 > match(c(4,8),x) [1] 1 5 match only returns the first encounter of a match, as you requested. For multiple matching, %in% is the way to go : > x <- sample(1:4,10,replace=T) > x [1] 3 4 3 3 2 3 1 1 2 2 > which(x %in% c(2,4)) [1] 2 ...


29

Many CPUs have "vector" or "SIMD" instruction sets which apply the same operation simultaneously to two, four, or more pieces of data. Modern x86 chips have the SSE instructions, many PPC chips have the "Altivec" instructions, and even some ARM chips have a vector instruction set, called NEON. "Vectorization" (simplified) is the process of rewriting a loop ...


28

I usually use EYE for that: A = magic(4) A(logical(eye(size(A)))) = 99 A = 99 2 3 13 5 99 10 8 9 7 99 12 4 14 15 99 Alternatively, you can just create the list of linear indices, since from one diagonal element to the next, it takes nRows+1 steps: [nRows,nCols] = size(A); ...


28

In the first case: the code overwrites the same memory location a[i] in each iteration. This inherently sequentializes the loop as the loop iterations are not independent. (In reality, only the final iteration is actually needed. So the entire inner loop could be taken out.) In the second case: GCC recognizes the loop as a reduction operation - for which it ...


25

The second loop involves a lot less cache activity, so it's easier for the processor to keep up with the memory demands.


22

So, basically, you want your code to run faster. JNI is the answer. I know you said it didn't work for you, but let me show you that you are wrong. Here's Dot.java: import java.nio.FloatBuffer; import com.googlecode.javacpp.*; import com.googlecode.javacpp.annotation.*; @Platform(include="Dot.h", options="fastfpu") public class Dot { static { ...


21

Vectorization means that the compiler detects that your independent instructions can be executed as one SIMD instruction. Usual example is that if you do something like for(i=0; i<N; i++){ a[i] = a[i] + b[i]; } It will be vectorized as (using vector notation) for (i=0; i<(N-N%VF); i+=VF){ a[i:i+VF] = a[i:i+VF] + b[i:i+VF]; } Basically the ...


21

The answers given are all correct. I just wanted to elaborate on gnovice's remark about floating-point testing. When comparing floating-point numbers for equality, it is necessary to use a tolerance value. Two types of tolerance comparisons are commonly used: absolute tolerance and relative tolerance. (source) An absolute tolerance comparison of a and b ...


21

Straight from Wes McKinney's Python for Data Analysis book, pg. 132 (I highly recommended this book): Another frequent operation is applying a function on 1D arrays to each column or row. DataFrame’s apply method does exactly this: In [116]: frame = DataFrame(np.random.randn(4, 3), columns=list('bde'), index=['Utah', 'Ohio', 'Texas', 'Oregon']) In ...


20

Use our friend lookup, designed precisely for this purpose: In [17]: prices Out[17]: AAPL GOOG IBM XOM 2011-01-10 339.44 614.21 142.78 71.57 2011-01-13 342.64 616.69 143.92 73.08 2011-01-26 340.82 616.50 155.74 75.89 2011-02-02 341.29 612.00 157.93 79.46 2011-02-10 351.42 616.44 159.32 79.68 2011-03-03 356.40 ...


19

outer(0:5, 0:6, sum) don't work because sum is not "vectorized" (in the sense of returning a vector of the same length as its two arguments). This example should explain the difference: sum(1:2,2:3) 8 1:2 + 2:3 [1] 3 5 You can vectorize sum using mapply for example: identical(outer(0:5, 0:6, function(x,y)mapply(sum,x,y)), outer(0:5, ...


18

ifelse(x < 5, 1, 2) > x [1] 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 [16] 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.9 3.0 [31] 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 3.9 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 [46] 4.6 4.7 4.8 4.9 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 5.9 6.0 [61] ...


18

In [9]: s = Series([list('ABC'),list('DEF'),list('ABEF')]) In [10]: s Out[10]: 0 [A, B, C] 1 [D, E, F] 2 [A, B, E, F] dtype: object In [11]: s.apply(lambda x: Series(1,index=x)).fillna(0) Out[11]: A B C D E F 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 1 1


17

np.vectorize is just a convenience function. It doesn't actually make code run any faster. If it isn't convenient to use np.vectorize, simply write your own function that works as you wish. The purpose of np.vectorize is to transform functions which are not numpy-aware (e.g. take floats as input and return floats as output) into functions that can operate ...


16

To plot your rectangles, create a data frame where each row contains the coordinates for a single rectangle. This construct works for all polygons, not just rectangles. Once you know this, it's easy to avoid the loop. Then, just be careful whether you map a variable to an aesthetic or not. In your case, you need to set alpha to whatever value you wish, so ...


16

The best tool for testing the performance of MATLAB code is Steve Eddins' timeit function, available here from the MATLAB Central File Exchange. It handles many subtle issues related to benchmarking MATLAB code for you, such as: ensuring that JIT compilation is used by wrapping the benchmarked code in a function warming up the code running the code ...


16

How to vectorize without knowing how to vectorize: First, I'll only discuss vectorizing the first double loop, you can follow the same logic for the second loop. I tried to show a thought process from scratch, so though the final answer is just 2 lines long, it is worthwhile to see how a beginner can try to obtain it. First, I recommend "massaging" the ...


15

Use the function num2cell: B = num2cell(A); Works with matrices too.


15

In general, you should try to use a vectorized function to begin with. Using strsplit will frequently require some kind of iteration afterwards (which will be slower), so try to avoid it if possible. In your example, you should use nchar instead: > nchar(words) [1] 1 5 5 3 More generally, take advantage of the fact that strsplit returns a list and ...


15

These are the steps I would take to solve your problem in a vectorized way, starting with a given vector sig: First, threshold the vector to get a vector tsig of zeros and ones (zeroes where the absolute value of the signal drops close enough to zero, ones elsewhere): tsig = (abs(sig) >= eps); %# Using eps as the threshold Next, find the starting ...


14

CUDA programs compile to the PTX instruction set. That instruction set does not contain SIMD instructions. So, CUDA programs cannot make explicit use of SIMD. However, the whole idea of CUDA is to do SIMD on a grand scale. Individual threads are part of groups called warps, within which every thread executes exactly the same sequence of instructions ...


14

Try this: >> xyz = [1 2 3; 4 5 6; 7 8 9; 2 8 4] xyz = 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 2 8 4 >> distance = sqrt(sum(xyz.^2, 2)) distance = 3.74165738677394 8.77496438739212 13.9283882771841 9.16515138991168


14

You could just vectorize the function and then apply it directly to a Numpy array each time you need it: def f(x): return x * x + 3 * x - 2 if x > 0 else x * 5 + 8 f = numpy.vectorize(f) # or use a different name if you want to keep the original f result_array = f(A) # if A is your Numpy array It's probably better to specify an explicit output ...


14

The inverse of a permutation p of np.arange(n) is the array of indices s that sort p, i.e. p[s] == np.arange(n) must be all true. Such an s is exactly what np.argsort returns: >>> p = np.array([3, 2, 0, 1]) >>> np.argsort(p) array([2, 3, 1, 0]) >>> p[np.argsort(p)] array([0, 1, 2, 3])


14

No. You're mixing two important concepts: MATLAB is designed to perform vector operations really quickly. MATLAB is an interpreted language, which is why loops are so slow in it. MATLAB sidesteps this issue by providing extremely fast (usually written in C, and optimized for the specific architecture) and well tested functions to operate on vectors. There ...


14

The solutions offered so far all imply creating a logical(length(vec)) and doing a full or partial scan on this. As you note, the vector is sorted. We can exploit this by doing a binary search. I started thinking I'd be super-clever and implement this in C for even greater speed, but had trouble with debugging the indexing of the algorithm (which is the ...


13

As a personal preference, I like my code to be as succinct and readable as possible. Here's what I would have done, though it doesn't meet your 'no-loops' requirement: for m = 1:C Z(:,:,m) = X(:,:,m)*Y; end This results in an A x D x C matrix Z. And of course, you can always pre-allocate Z to speed things up by using Z = zeros(A,D,C);.


13

You could use the function SETXOR, which will return the values that are not in the intersection of the two cell arrays. If it returns an empty array, then the two cell arrays contain the same values: arraysAreEqual = isempty(setxor(a,b)); EDIT: Some performance measures... Since you were curious about performance measures, I thought I'd test the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible