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64

These are the ones I'm aware of: -ms- Microsoft mso- Microsoft Office -moz- Mozilla Foundation (Gecko-based browsers) -o-, -xv- Opera Software -atsc- Advanced Television Standards Committee -wap- The WAP Forum -webkit- Safari, Chrome (and other WebKit-based browsers) -khtml- Konqueror browser -apple- Webkit supports properties using the -apple- prefixes as ...


32

The following example shows how to do this /* #ie10 will only be red in MSIE 10, both in high contrast (display setting) and default mode */ @media screen and (-ms-high-contrast: active), (-ms-high-contrast: none) { #ie10 { color: red; } } Warning: will probably work in IE11+, too.


32

Though it is not always the case, one of the most common reasons why a property like transition or animation works on some browsers and not others is because of vendor prefixes. What are vendor prefixes? At the time version 4 of Firefox was introduced, the CSS transition module specification was a Working Draft. Before a spec is finalized (in practice, ...


29

It's because the features were implemented by vendors before the specification reached its final release stage. The vendor prefixes ensure that there are no clashes with changing functionality etc. Originally, the point of vendor prefixes was to allow browser makers to start supporting experimental CSS declarations. Let’s say a W3C working group ...


29

As @zeroflagL wrote it appears that since jQuery 1.8.0 .css() does add browser specific prefixes (see this). In earlier versions this is not done automatically by jQuery's .css(). You will have to do it by yourself or you can use jQuery's .cssHooks() to add vendor prefixes. Code example from here: (function($) { if ( !$.cssHooks ) { throw("jQuery ...


28

Update: LESS >= 1.6 As of version 1.6 (see changelog) property name interpolation is implemented in LESS. So you don't need any magic anymore. (For older versions, see my original answer.) Your mixin would work basically as is: LESS: .vendor(@property; @value){ -webkit-@{property}: @value; -moz-@{property}: @value; -ms-@{property}: ...


25

The best practise is undisputedly to have the unprefixed property last: .foo { -moz-border-radius: 10px; /* Mozilla */ -webkit-border-radius: 10px; /* Webkit */ border-radius: 10px; /* W3C */ } Whichever is last out of -webkit-border-radius and border-radius will be the one that's used. -webkit-border-radius is the "experimental" ...


19

Your problem lies in calcstyle.css here: * { -webkit-user-select: none; -khtml-user-select: none; -moz-user-select: none; -ms-user-select: none; user-select: none; } I'm not entirely sure why user-select: none; would prevent you from typing into an input but removing this block fixes it for me. EDIT Here is a possible solution: ...


13

As of IE8, IE doesn't support the CSS3 border-radius property. Not sure what you saw that said it did. You can use images, javascript, or many other tricks to round corners in IE.


12

Ordering is important. To future proof your code you need to make the W3C spec come last, so the cascade favors it above the vendor prefixed versions. .foo { -moz-border-radius: 10px; /* Mozilla */ -webkit-border-radius: 10px; /* Webkit */ border-radius: 10px; /* W3C */ } For example, lets say down the road Google Chrome supports ...


11

Just found this, it looks perfect: http://leaverou.github.com/prefixfree/


11

Although the syntax for vendor extensions is mentioned in the CSS3 Syntax module and introduced into the grammar to allow vendors to implement their own prefixes ignoring the standard, the actual vendor extensions themselves are not recognized as official CSS properties. This is not going to change, as they're proprietary and specific to the vendors that ...


11

1) You can add a class for that purpose which assigns all the properties. 2) If you try it your way then, Javascript will reassign the property 3 times and end up with the last one executed as the active one, So document.getElementById('theDiv').style.cursor = '-webkit-grabbing'; document.getElementById('theDiv').style.cursor = '-moz-grabbing'; ...


10

No, they are browser specific properties, and not defined in the standard CSS specification. That being said, they correctly follow the rules for vendor specific extension of CSS. It's just not in the W3C official CSS specification.


8

jQuery DOES add vendor prefixes. It first checks for the presence of the standard property and if it's not found for a vendor prefixed version. From the source: // return a css property mapped to a potentially vendor prefixed property function vendorPropName( style, name ) { // shortcut for names that are not vendor prefixed if ( name in style ) { ...


8

I just did some more research on this, and it's looking more like a Chrome bug than something about IE. Here's what the spec says about unrecognized and non-animatable properties in transition-property: If one of the identifiers listed is not a recognized property name or is not an animatable property, the implementation must still start transitions on ...


7

The idea is that once the rule is standardized that will overrule the other styles. Since the standard rule is on the bottom, it will be used instead of a vendor specific rule if the browser knows how. This allows for standardization while still supporting current implementations. In your second example the vendor specific rules would override the ...


6

Which of the following is better to do? Using javascript to find whether the support is there, and use the properties if they are supported, if above is false, check the user agent and apply vendor specific properties accordingly. Using all the browser prefixes in the classes and let the browser use whichever suits it. Option 1 consists of ...


6

It really depends on which features and which browsers you want to fully support. Even now some browsers are lagging. Here is a really excellent guide: http://caniuse.com/


6

Introduction The problem is not quite as simple as you might think. It is easy enough to compare revisions of the "official" list of supported CSS properties and determine the revisions at which they were introduced or retired; however, support for the use of legacy prefixes is also determined by how they are handled by the CSS parser implementation. Thus, ...


6

The absolute simplest mixin would be like so: @mixin legacy-ie($ver: 7) { .ie#{$ver} & { @content; } } Output: .baz { background: #CCC; @include legacy-ie { background: black; } } If you wanted to emit styles that work for multiple IE versions at once without duplication, then this would be one way to do it: ...


6

Blink will not use vendor prefixes. Instead you'll need to enable experimental features in the browser configuration. See: http://www.chromium.org/blink#vendor-prefixes http://www.quirksmode.org/blog/archives/2013/04/blink.html Mozilla (Firefox) are doing something similar too: http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-webapps/2012OctDec/0731.html


5

In the Vendor Extensions combo select Warnings.


5

there is no -ms-border-radius internet explorer doesn't support it. The 'newest' thing microsoft has to say about rounded corners is this old table+images hack titled 'Staying Ahead of the Curve' ;-)


5

CSS3 has not been formally adopted as a complete standard yet—it is still a draft proposal. Vendor specific tags allow the vendors to begin to implement CSS3 draft standards or proposed ideas for CSS3 now using experimental implementations, while ensuring that their current rendering with these proprietary tags can be distinguished in the future from their ...


5

I don't know of any library that does this, but if they are all just prefixes--that is, there is no difference in name or syntax--writing a function yourself would be trivial. function setVendor(element, property, value) { element.style["webkit" + property] = value; element.style["moz" + property] = value; element.style["ms" + property] = value; ...


5

Have you tried -ms-transform:rotateZ(10deg);? As -webkitis also a vendor specific prefix, you'll have to add those for non-webkit browsers, too. (like -ms, -moz, -o) Check out this CSS3 3D Transforms Tutorial for more info: http://www.pageresource.com/css3/3d-transforms-tutorial/


5

The main issue here is that PHP (the server) won't know the CSS capabilities of your browser off-hand (the client). The only information that's remotely close to identifying a browser that would get sent to PHP is the user-agent string. Even then, you would still need to research the CSS capabilities of a specific version of a specific browser or engine, ...


5

Using the css browser selector from http://rafael.adm.br/css_browser_selector/ you can add a simple + to the code and call out IE10 from your CSS. Look for /msie\s(\d)/ and change it to /msie\s(\d+)/. Now in your CSS just add .ie10 before your selector like so: .ie10 .class-name { width: 100px; } .class-name { width: 90px; } You should now see IE10 ...


5

The original purpose of vendor prefixes was to give vendors the ability to add their own non-standard features for use in their CSS implementations. However, most of them are used for experimental versions of things that eventually become standards. If an experimental property is unprefixed, it implies that it's the correct, standard version of a property. ...



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