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12

The Euler method is a first order integration scheme, i.e. the total error is proportional to the step size. However, it can be numerically unstable, in other words, the accumulated error can overwhelm the calculation giving you nonsense. Please note, this instability can occur regardless of how small you make the step size or whether the system is linear ...


12

The Verlet method is is good at simulating systems with energy conservation, and the reason is that it is symplectic. In order to understand this statement you have to describe a time step in your simulation as a function, f, that maps the state space into itself. In other words each timestep can be written on the following form. (x(t+dt), v(t+dt)) = ...


5

There is a Guido van Rossum's article linked in the section Performance Tips of the Python Wiki. In its conclusion, you can read the following sentence: If you feel the need for speed, go for built-in functions - you can't beat a loop written in C. The essay continues with a list of guidelines for loop optimization. I recommend both resources, since ...


5

The faithful Verlet sequence has xn depending on the previous two values of x -- xn-1 and xn-2. A canonical example of such a sequence is the Fibonacci sequence which has this one-liner Haskell definition: fibs :: [Int] fibs = 0 : 1 : zipWith (+) fibs (tail fibs) -- f_(n-1) f_n This defines the Fibonacci sequence as an ...


4

If you write Python like you write Java, of course it's going to be slower, idiomatic java does not translate well to idiomatic python. Is this performance difference part of the nature of Python? What should I do differently from the above if I want to get better performance from my own Python programs? E.g store the properties of all particles inside ...


4

I know this question is quite old by now, but this really has nothing to do with the "superiority" of one of these methods over the other, or with your programming of them - they're just good at different things. (So no, this answer won't really be about code. Or even about programming. It's more about math, really...) The Runge-Kutta family of solvers are ...


3

I would also suggest to read about other physics engines. There are a few open source engines which use a variety of methods for calculating the "physics". Newton Game Dynamics Chipmunk Bullet Box2D ODE (Open Dynamics Engine) There are also ports of most of the engines: Pymunk PyBullet PyBox2D PyODE If you read through the documentation of those ...


2

Maybe you figured it out already, but I think the mistake is in the checkBoundaries code for the periodic boundaries. I might be wrong, but I don't think you can use the % operator on floats/doubles. I think the code should be (see also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Periodic_boundary_conditions ) Vector3d op = a.getPosition(); //old position double w = ...


2

Actually, if you read on you will find that both variants are represented on the wikipedia page. Basic Verlet The basic second order central difference quotient discretization for second order ODE x''(t)=a(x(t)) is xn+1 - 2*xn + xn-1 = an*dt^2 Note that there are not velocities in the iteration and also not in the acceleration function a(x). This ...


2

for (y[0] = 0, i = 1; i <2*n; i++) { y[i] = vverlet(verlet, dt, ti + dt*(i-1), x[i-1], y[i-1]); } x is defined from 0 to n-1.


2

Your differential equation is x''=a(x)=-k/m*x, with the midpoint formula of the basic Verlet method x0-2*x1+x2= h*h*a(x1) you get x2 = -x0+(2-h*h*k/m)*x1 To get the correct error order, you need the best initialization possible, which is x1 = x0 + v0*h + 0.5*a(x0)*h*h You can not use the Verlet method in the presence of drag. Or at least you can ...


1

As written in the answer to the previous question, the moment friction enters the equation, the system is no longer conservative and the name "Verlet" does no longer apply. It is still a valid discretization of m*x''+b*x'+k*x = F (with some slight error with large consequences). The discretization employs the central difference quotients of first and ...


1

The facts that your integrator accepts scalars and that your question is about 2-dimensional system makes me think that you are calling the integrator twice, once for each component. This simply won't work since your system will be taking unrealistic moves through the phase space. The integrator works with vector quantities: X(t+dt) = X(t) + V(t) dt + ...


1

There are some problems with the physics and some problems with the code. First, the problem with the physics. Assuming that we're not modelling an alternative universe where the laws of physics are different, Newton's law of universal gravitation says that F=G*m1*m2/(r*r). However, force is a vector, not a scalar, so it has both magnitude and ...


1

Your question isn't very clear, but there are a few sources of error in your code. Eg, for i > 0 x[i+1] = x[i]-v[i]*dt+(a[i]*(dt**2)*0.5) tries to use the value of v[i], but that element doesn't exist yet in the v list. To give a concrete example, when i = 1, you need v[1], but the only thing in the v list at that stage is v[0]; v[1] isn't computed ...


1

If everything just coasts along in a linear way, it wouldn't matter what method you used, but when something interesting (i.e. non-linear) happens, you need to look more carefully, either by considering the non-linearity directly (verlet) or by taking smaller timesteps (rk4).


1

Once you separate them, you then resolve their velocities/momentums. How are you doing that? Most likely, to determine the direction to separate, you use a vector that goes from the center of each. The deeper the penetration, the less accurate this vector (collision normal) may be. That can cause unexpected results. What works better is not to have to ...


1

I don't know if I'm going to answer your specific questions, but here are my thoughts. You have defined a very simple force model. In this case, saving some steps may not improve the performance, because calculating the new step in RK4 may take longer. If the force model is more complex, RK4 with adaptive step may save you much time. From your plot I think ...



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