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2

After you finished the merge and see "oh, something more needs to be changed", just use git add <your additional changed file> && git commit --amend -C HEAD. This will add your changes to the commit HEAD points to, which should be your merge commit if you didn't do anything after the merge. If you already added an extra commit with this change, ...


0

The best recommended solution (I'm well experienced in that issue) is to keep the CVS repo as read-only repository and merge the latest revision to the git repository without history. You'll benefit from it a lot for the long run! About the tool for the migration, try (my tool): https://github.com/tikalk/tikal-alm-tools


3

You have to go to master and update it. Be sure to have a clean working tree. // Go to your master branch git checkout master // Update master branch to recoveredfromdetachedheadlost git rebase recoveredfromdetachedheadlost // Delete obsolete branch (if it's on the same commit in your log) git branch -d recoveredfromdetachedheadlost [Optional] // Push ...


0

I recently found a service called gitzip and its also open source: site - http://kinolien.github.io/gitzip/ repo - https://github.com/KinoLien/gitzip Vist the above site, enter the repo or directory URL, you can download individual files or whole directory as a zip file.


0

You can have a look to these link Git workflow Git branch model On my side, I would suggest to commit bug on master or development branch and then rebase before to push. Separated branch followed by a merge should be used only for new feature or minor release. I think it break the history to have to many merge. Example (master) Init --- Bug1 --- ...


1

Branches in Git are ridiculously cheap; it rarely hurts to create extras. People should not feel obligated to make them, but it should be their default and they should not feel silly for having made one that turned out to be trivial, either. Note that it's possible to "move" a commit onto a branch, as long as you have not published (pushed, or allowed ...


0

Consider this comparison of using git flow commands versus raw git commands: git flow init is similar to: git init git commit --allow-empty -m "Initial commit" git checkout -b develop master (it also add to your config gitflow-specific settings: [gitflow "branch"] master = master develop = develop [gitflow "prefix"] feature = feature/ ...


1

git flow init does not actually create any release, hotfix or feature branches, because as opposed to the develop and master branch, these are not single, everlasting branches. They are created as feature/abc, release/42.0 or hotfix/foo for every feature, hotfix or realease you create, and are merged and then deleted once you finish. What git flow init ...


-1

Is the code used? Keep it. Is it a Line Of Business application and the system been decommissioned? Archive it. Is it a product that was sold / distributed to 3rd parties? Keep it. Ultimately disk space is cheap. Most version control systems use some form of delta for the revision history so keeping the full history probably isn't much more "expensive" ...


1

Here's how git works : When you fetch a branch from remote, say branchA, and checkout to that branch, you actually are looking at your local copy of that branch. To be precise, origin/branchA is the remote branch, branchA is your local copy of the branch. Now in your case your local copy is actually in a remote machine to which you ftp and make changes. ...


0

You can use bzr revno --tree to get the revision number of the current working tree. Alternatively, you can also use bzr version-info with an appropriate template, e.g.: bzr version-info --custom --template='{revno}\n'


0

Let's take this in parts... I know that git reset --hard 4 will make my repo appear to have been rewinded to commit 4, but from what I understand, that merely changes the commit master points to from 9 to 4 but does not actually delete anything. All the data is still there, and is recoverable if you know the SHA of commit 9. This is correct. Moreover, ...


0

First, initialize a new git repository in the folder where you do your development: cd wwwroot/app_stage git init git add . git commit -m "Initial commit" Now you're using git. I'd make the production folder a separate git repository so you can pull changes from the stage folder with git pull. cd wwwroot/app git init git remote add stage ...


0

You can use TFS Integration Tool to achieve the code migration(TFS-to-TFS). TFS Integration Tool moving data between two different servers. The migration is done through the APIs of TFS, and there also some limitations.(Check the above link for more info) Detail steps please see my answer in this question: Move Team Project to another Project Collection TFS ...


0

git reset does not delete content. its simply make change your HEAD to point to the new SHA-1 you asked for. How can i delete content? I am also aware of git filter-branch but that only removes files from the history, not commits. Let me correct you. Once you do a git filter branch its updating the content and creating a new commit. So where is the ...


0

To do this from powershell open a powershell window and paste in the following: echo y | & 'C:\Program Files (x86)\GitExtensions\PuTTY\plink.exe' -ssh git@github.com echo y | & 'C:\Program Files (x86)\GitExtensions\PuTTY\plink.exe' -ssh git@gist.github.com echo y | & 'C:\Program Files (x86)\GitExtensions\PuTTY\plink.exe' -ssh git@bitbucket.org ...


0

There are many approaches each with some pros and cons. The following are the main options I would suggest. Database backup and restore This is the only path that guarantees full fidelity. It has some technical difficulties (e.g. SQL Server version and editions) and political (how much information you care to expose, how much effort you want to put in ...


0

Solved. We use Windows 10 on agent, and there is a locking folders where system processes are running. To avoid this, you need to create folder on C:\ and use it as a custom path in VCS rules.


0

To me this happened due to a power failure while doing a git push. The messages looked like this: $ git status error: object file .git/objects/c2/38824eb3fb602edc2c49fccb535f9e53951c74 is empty error: object file .git/objects/c2/38824eb3fb602edc2c49fccb535f9e53951c74 is empty fatal: loose object c238824eb3fb602edc2c49fccb535f9e53951c74 (stored in ...


0

Have in %APPDATA%\Subversion\config store-passwords = yes store-auth-creds = yes (or default commented strings) and perform any operation with authentication


0

I think you're looking at the wrong command - what is it you want to do? Status gives you the current status of a checked out file, so it by definition requires a sandbox with the file checked out in order to compare that to your repository. You might be looking for the rlog command. It will output information about the file without having a checked out ...


2

You are looking for something similar to the git flow workflow. Read all about it in the following post by Vincent Driessen


0

what i can infer from your description is that you want a complete history of the commits on that branch. You can simply do : git log which would show you recent commits along with the date and author of that commit. if you do git show {SHA1} of any commit it would show you the changes that were made by that commit. If you do a git log --stat it would ...


0

git log --pretty with a user specified format will let you extract the things you want in a format that might be more easily parsed later.


0

You should also probably check out this awesome book called Pro Git -- it's free, free is good right?


0

You don't have to commit those. If the other branch hasn't also changed those files, then you can leave them staged. Though you probably don't want to, because - well, because now they'll be staged on the other branch and it sounds like you don't want to commit them on the other branch. % vi foo.c % git add foo.c % git checkout branch M foo.c ...


0

When you switch branches the content of your tracked files will change to reflect the tip of the target branch. If what you have in your working directory and stage does not conflict with the target branch state then no, you do not need to commit and you can switch branches as you desire. But, I'm guessing that you are seeing this error message: error: ...


0

Parallel work can be done in CA Harvest SCM too. The understanding you have gained is a little bit flawed. A "change package" is atomic unit in the lifecycle. It is a group of files which are part of a logical change. These packages are owned/assigned to a user and he can work independently. Now coming to your question, how parallel work is achieved in CA ...


0

Just remove .git folder and add it again. This simple solution worked for me.


3

Commits are stored as a Directed Acyclic Graph. If you have no merge commits in your history, then going back from a single branch head is equivalent to a linked list. You can see the full contents of a commit by using: git cat-file commit HEAD The tree line refers to the contents of that commit (e.g. as seen by git ls-files). Note that this is different ...


1

You have at least 2 options. If master is an ancestor of master-2, then you could rebase: git rebase master-2 Or else, you could create a new branch and cherry-pick the range of revisions: git checkout -b new-feature-2 git cherry-pick master..new-feature


0

You Should Try Something Like:- $ for branch in `git branch -r | cut -d '/' -f2` ; do git checkout $branch && git pull origin $branch ; done


0

I've installed Anaconda (2.5.0) on my Ubuntu (14.04) With Anaconda 2.5.0 my versions are: python 2.7.11 Numpy 1.10.4 Scipy 0.17.0 I've download the code from the link, and it worked perfectly on my machine Can you try to install Anaconda and see if it solve your problems? https://www.continuum.io/downloads


2

You have to clone the repository to your local machine first. This can be done with the git clone command like git clone my-user-name@177.62.28.96:path/to/git/repo After that you can do your edits and then push them back to the server with git push origin Note: You should initialize your repository on the server as a bare one (git init --bare) since ...


0

When you clone a remote repository, a local copy of all the remote branches is available. In SourceTree, expand the remote's name, by default origin. You will see all the remote branches. The equivalent git command is $ git checkout <remote-branchname> Check Out All Remote Branches Locally If your intention is to create a local branch for each ...


0

Removing a file from SVN without deleting it locally nowhere is a common problem. One prominent example is the file .classpath in an Eclipse project. Putting this configuration file under SVN is marvellous as long as all machines used in the project have the same Eclipse and Java installation. Once this condition is violated commits start to break other ...


1

Another way to change default commit messages is to install a prepare-commit-msg git hook. This allows you to provide a script to modify the commit message in different ways depending on the situation (whether this is a new commit, a merge commit, and amended commit etc.). See prepare-commit-msg under git hooks --help.


0

It's not possible to see which branch you were, when you executed the first commit, so it is possible that you made the commit directly to the develop branch, thinking that you were on the BUG-# branch. That would explain why you get the "Already up-to-date" message, given that your local develop is now ahead of the develop on the remote repository. An ...


2

You can change the default commit message template with git config --global commit.template ~/.gitmessage.txt. (Just make sure you have a .gitmessage.txt file and that the contents are what you'd like the default to be.)


0

Maybe you could use a CI server to keep the subtree repository up-to-date. People in the main project could just keep committing to the main repository without caring too much about the subtree and an automatically triggered CI job would perform the subtree push.


0

%windir%\System32\GroupPolicyUsers Unhide files or MMC add Group Policy Object Editor -> Users Tab -> Non-Administrators Policy Expand User Configuration > Windows Settings > Scripts > Logon; Click Add; Click Browse; It will open up the folder containing scripts. If you go up two folders you will find the folder to copy to other machines (for me it was ...


3

It seems like github is experiencing some issues right now, which the issue may be attributable to - https://status.github.com/ says there might be service issues. It is strange though that this has happened for two different repos. If both of these commits were tried recently then they might both be related to github's issues. I tried to create a repo and ...


0

If by "created a new project", you mean you just rm -rf'ed all your code (except your .git subdir) and started from scratch, well all your old commits are still in the history and you can get all of them back (if not, it wouldn't be a very good SCM tool). So, if these are artifacts, then yes, they will all be there. If you forgot to delete a dot prefix file ...


0

Behold https://github.com/dreamyguy/gitlogg, the last git-log => JSON parser you will ever need! Some of Gitlogg's features are: Parse the git log of multiple repositories into one JSON file. Introduced repository key/value. Introduced files changed, insertions and deletions keys/values. Introduced impact key/value, which represents the cumulative ...


0

you need input: $git pull, $ git fetch $ git merge. If you use a git push origin master --force,you will have big problem .


0

You could use Git cherry-pick to apply changes from a different branch on top of your checked-out branch. If that is not what you prefer, you could possibly make .patch or .diff files out of the commits and apply that on top of the desired branch.


1

For renaming a file, do git mv README README.md git commit -m "file renamed" git push origin master


2

A google-services.json file is, from the FireBase doc: Firebase manages all of your API settings and credentials through a single configuration file. The file is named google-services.json on Android and GoogleService-Info.plist on iOS. It seems to make sense to add it to a .gitignore and not include it in a public repo. This was discussed in issue ...


1

Use the log function, and transform the data as desired. I doubt you'll find all these informstion - the user.ip field does not make sense, because commits are not necessarily on a network.


1

Rather than clone, perhaps you can simply download the file. Assuming the repository is public, you can download a single file like this: wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/jquery/jquery/master/src/ajax.js To get the url, navigate to the file in GitHub, and choose the "raw" view.



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