Hot answers tagged

21

In a superficial view they're really similar, although I personally consider more similar vert.x ideas to some MQ system than to akka... the vert.x topology is more flat: A verticle share a message with other verticle and receive a response... instead akka is more like a tree, where you've several actors, but you can supervise actors using other actor,..for ...


20

Tomcat is a servlet container, so it offers you a platform that helps you to develop and deploy HTTP based applications like web sites or web services. Vert.x instead helps you to develop and deploy any kind of asynchronous applications. It's true that modern versions of Tomcat support asynchronous servlets, but Vert.x comes with a far larger amount of user ...


16

create a maven project as the manual says. Then import the project as Maven project Create a new launcher (Eclipse) using as main class For Vert.x 2.x: "org.vertx.java.platform.impl.cli.Starter" For Vert.x 3.x: "io.vertx.core.Starter" In the tab "Program Arguments" type: "run your.package.ServerVerticle -conf conf.json" You can omit the conf.json if ...


12

Basic auth is all about the Authorization Header. You should add that header with a value composed of "basic " (note the blank) and your login:pass (separated by a colon) encoded in base64. This is only secure if you're using HTTPS. Here is how I get this done in vert.x : HttpClient client = vertx.createHttpClient().setSSL(true) .setTrustAll(true) //...


7

I think I've found the answer to my own question... In vert.x 2.1M1 they have added HTTP compression to HttpServer and DefaultHttpServer. To activate it, you must use the method setCompressionSupported(true). It didn't seemed to work for me, even if I used vert.x 2.1M1. It was because I am using Groovy, and vert.x mod-lang-groovy hasn't been updated since ...


6

It's not like Node.js is even really dominant today (except in the Hacker News community of course), it hasn't even had a 1.0 release yet. Funny to be speculating on what might replace it already :) Performance is nice (though micro-benchmarks are not the right way to judge that) but if that was the only thing that mattered we would all be writing custom ...


6

We haven't uploaded vert.x into Maven Central yet, but it is near the top of the TODO list. I'll update this post when it's done. [UPDATE] The next release is imminent and will feature a Gradle-based build and Mavenised modular components, amongst other things. The Maven co-ordinates will be: "org.vert-x:vertx-%stuff%:%version%". (Note the dash: The ...


6

There isn't an explicit limit of a size of a SockJS message. But unfortunately SockJS is quite fragile and should not be used to send huge data. In ideal world you'd send control messages (latency-sensitive) over SockJS and big payloads (for throughput) using external methods - for example using an AJAX call. On technical side you should be able to push ...


6

There are options for sharing data among vertx instances on different machines Option 1. You could use the Vert.x ClusterManager and it's maps: ClusterManager clusterManager = ((VertxInternal)vertx).clusterManager(); Map map = clusterManager.getSyncMap("mapName"); // shared distributed map That map is backed by a Hazelcast IMap and is distributed. This ...


6

The accepted answer is perfectly fine. Just for completness's sake, you also simply can run a plain old java main class, having a the main start your vertx instance. Code should be something like: public static void main(final String... args) { Vertx vertx = Vertx.vertx(); vertx.deployVerticle(/* put your stuff here */); } There you go.


6

Both approaches can and have worked. So if switching would incur a high development cost and/or schedule hit then it's probably not worth the effort...yet. Make the switch when the costs become unacceptably high. Think of using microservices as a gradual switching strategy. If you are early on in your development cycle then making the switch early may make ...


6

Yes, this is possible. You can check out the Kotlin codegen tests for an example of code that does this. (Note that this is not part of the stable API of Kotlin, and tends to change quite frequently.)


5

So, as of 2013/11/04: Scala support has everything up to Vert.x 2.0.2-final plus DNS support. So you need 2.1M1 of Vert.x core and the 0.2.0 release of Scala. We need to add UDP support, EventBus timeouts (mostly done, but there seems to be a bug in the vert.x core project: https://bugs.eclipse.org/bugs/show_bug.cgi?id=420850 ), provide asynchronous ...


5

After doing a bit of google search I have figured that at detailed comparison of Akka vs Vert.x has not yet been done ( atleast I cound't find it ). Computation model: Vert.x is based on Event Driven model. Akka is based on Actor Model of concurrency, Reactive Streams: Vert.x has Reactive Streams builtin Akka supports Reactive Streams via Akka ...


4

I just was missing to start the pumps. Then it worked. Pump.createPump(socket, cliSocket).start(); Pump.createPump(cliSocket, socket).start();


4

Afaik you can't share data between different instances of vert.x -- from the documentation "[...] Such a use case is better solved by providing a shared map structure that can be accessed directly by different verticle instances in the same vert.x instance." Since "vert.x instance" means "jvm instance" you can't use sharedmap/set between different jvm. You ...


4

This is the answer: HttpServer httpServer = vertx.createHttpServer(); // Create HTTP server httpServer = httpServer.requestHandler(new Handler<HttpServerRequest>() { @Override public void handle(HttpServerRequest req) { req.response().sendFile("web/" + req.path()); } }); // Create SockJS Server SockJSServer ...


4

I would suggest what Fran already hinted at. Best you create your Maven project from the archetype (http://vertx.io/maven_dev.html) such as mvn archetype:generate -Dfilter=io.vertx: -DgroupId=your.group.id -DartifactId=your-artifact -Dversion=0.0.1-SNAPSHOT and add the IDE specifics via maven, for example for Eclipse mvn eclipse:eclipse By that you ...


4

I don't think anyone in the consulting company I work for has deployed a new application to a Big Name, shared application server in the last five years or so. Virtualization displaced the app server as the app-to-iron multiplexer, and those VMs are now being displaced by Docker containers. Apps embed their own HTTP stack, which may be Tomcat, but ...


4

I believe spring-boot has not "native support" for vertx - see list of spring boot starters. Although I don't know vertx, you can use it with spring-boot the same way you would use it in any other spring application - example that google found.


4

VertxOptions options = new VertxOptions(); options.setBlockedThreadCheckPeriod(1000*60*60); https://groups.google.com/forum/#!searchin/vertx/BlockedThreadChecker/vertx/MWx8ma7Ig4o/rFqdYdDErtYJ


4

The way you're running the vertices, they won't be able to see each other. They're essentially being started as completely separate processes with clustering disabled (the default). You have to run the vertices in cluster mode in order to get them to locate and communicate with one another. Use the -cluster option to enable Hazelcast clustering. You may also ...


4

Vert.x event loop is in fact classical event loop existing on many platform. And of course, most explanations and docs could be find for Node.js, as it's the most popular framework based on this architecture pattern. Take a look at one more or less good explanation of mechanics under Node.js event loop. Vert.x tutorial has fine explanation between "Don’t ...


4

You are doing the same blunder as I did once. Vertx guys must update this explicitly in their document Vertx.vertx() everytime launches a new vertx instance and you end up having new event loop threads with every request. Cache your Vertx.vertx() and use cached vertx instance every time. Vertx cachedVertx = Vertx.vertx(); ... cachedVertx.executeBlocking(...


3

Vertx has build-in clustering support. I haven't tried it with many nodes, but it seemed to work well with a few. Internally it uses hazelcast to organise the nodes. Vertx also runs on a JVM, which has already many monitoring/admin tools which might be useful. So Vertx seems to me like the "batteries included" solution.


3

There are some interesting things brought up by this micro-benchmark that may be worth addressing in Node, but it's very important to remember that nobody doing 100's of millions of hits per day (which these benchmarks show) does so on one machine. They do it on many machines. There are certain levels where faster languages make a difference (see for ...


3

I don't really know what you really mean by "rest framework". I used Jersey in Java and I replaced it with the vert.x RouteMatcher -- In javascript would be var matcher = new vertx.RouteMatcher(); matcher.get('/uppercase/:name', function(request) { var name = request.params()['name']; request.response.end(name.toUpperCase()); }); vertx....


3

I've talked to someone who is quite involved in vert.x and he told me that I'm basically right about the "concurrency" issue. BUT: He showed me a section in the docs which I totally missed where "Scaling servers" is explained in detail. The basic concept is, that when you write a verticle you just have single core performance. But it is possible to start ...


3

I don't think this is the way to go for vert.x. A better way would be to use the event bus properly instead of Executor. Have a worker respond to the event on the bus, do the processing, and signal the bus when it's completed. Creating threads defeats the purpose of going with vert.x.


3

For anyone who stumbles upon this question, I had the same problem and managed to fix it by deleting everything under the /mods folder in the /target directory. This is in fact mentioned in the vertx documentation - though maybe could be a little more emphatic. Once everything under /mods is removed, start up the application and it redeploys whenever ...



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