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32

Okay after a whole lot of digging through the net. I have found the following changes must be made; first of all, you must make the vertex array buffer dynamic. this is made possible by using the enumerator 'gl.DYNAMIC_DRAW' where previously in most tutorials we have 'gl.STATIC_DRAW'. Resulting in the following: gl.bufferData(gl.ARRAY_BUFFER, new ...


31

It seems mine is turned around and is beginning from right to left. Do you know what causes it? As others have noted, you are pushing the nodes-to-visit-next on the stack in order from left to right. That means they get popped off right-to-left, since a stack reverses the order. Stacks are last-in-first-out. You can fix the problem by making ...


26

From this I conclude that when rendering geometry which is all seams or mostly seams, when using GL_TRIANGLE_STRIP or _FAN, then I should never use indexed arrays, and should instead always use gl[Multi]DrawArrays. No, and the reason is quite simple. Your conclusion is based on the fact you have analysed a single quad composed by two triangles. These ...


20

Consider the following undirected graph: The set of vertices {2,4,5} is a minimum vertex cover of the graph. Why? because it's a vertex cover (all edges are covered) and there is no other vertex cover with fewer vertices. The set of vertices {2,3,5,6,7} is a minimal vertex cover. Why? because it's a vertex cover and any non-trivial subset of {2,3,5,6,7} ...


19

Uniform parameter is a data passed to GL shader, which doesn't change during the draw call. You can query a linked GLSL program for a list of active uniforms with the following code: int total = -1; glGetProgramiv( program_id, GL_ACTIVE_UNIFORMS, &total ); for(int i=0; i<total; ++i) { int name_len=-1, num=-1; GLenum type = GL_ZERO; ...


19

In OpenGL 3+ : varying is deprecated const is for... well, constants ! uniform is for per draw call (at most) values in is for input from the previous pipeline stage, i.e. per vertex (or per fragment) values at most, per primitive if using glAttribDivisor and hardware instanciation out is for output to the next stage Regarding outputs for fragment ...


15

This confused me at first too. Another way to think about this is visually (I'm a big visual thinker so maybe this will help you as well). Expanding on zezba's example, let's say we want to draw a quad using two triangles: As s/he pointed out, this can be done with just four vertices. So your vertex buffer would contain only FOUR entries. I'll label ...


15

The call to glBindBuffer tells OpenGL to use vertexBufferObject whenever it needs the GL_ARRAY_BUFFER. glEnableVertexAttribArray means that you want OpenGL to use vertex attribute arrays; without this call the data you supplied will be ignored. glVertexAttribPointer, as you said, tells OpenGL what to do with the supplied array data, since OpenGL doesn't ...


11

Actually it is the usual way to separate the vertex data into position, color, etc. using several arrays/buffers. Last time I came in contact with ES 2.0 was in the context of WebGL (which is has a slightly different spec but is ultimately based on ES 2.0). What is basically done is writing the data to seperate buffers using glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, ...


10

When they say "client/server" communication, they are not talking about a internet network. Client = The CPU Server = The GFX hardware These are two separate pieces of hardware. While they are (usually) attached to the same motherboard, they still need to communicate with each other. A graphics card doesn't usually have access to the main memory on your ...


9

No. Not in a simple way. You could use buffer textures and shader logic to implement it. But there is no simple API to make attributes index the way you want. All attributes are sampled from the same index (except when instanced array divisors are used, but that won't help you either). Note that doing this will be a memory/performance tradeoff. Using ...


8

Why is this fullscreen? Isn't the center of OpenGL coordinates at top left (0, 0)? Why with that vertexs the draw is correct? It seems that the center is really the real center of the screen and the width and height is from -1...1, but I dont really understand it because I thought that the center was at the top left... There are 3 things coming ...


8

A 'vector' is a mathematical concept; crudely, it represents a displacement in some coordinate space. A vertex is an element of some 3D (or 2D, really) geometry which typically has a position and some other attributes (color, texture coordinates, et cetera). The position of a vertex (and thus sometimes the vertex itself) can be represented by a vector if ...


8

Here is an example XNA 4.0 program that draws a simple textured square. It requires the Green-gel-x texture (from wiki-commons - link in code) added to the content project (or replaced with your own texture). After the textured square is drawn, a wireframe square is drawn over the top so you can see the triangles. This example uses an orthographic ...


7

You will need to split the quad into two triangles (does not matter which way), calculate two normals and average them. Ideally, both normals are the same anyway, and in the other case you have a best possible approximation. The reason is that a triangle is necessarily planar (there is no other way it could be), but for a quad you have no such guarantee. ...


7

Unfortunately there is no gl_VertexID equivalent in GLES2. You must create and pass additional data yourself.


7

The solution is just to: 1) Say the vertex descriptor is defined as typedef Graph::vertex_descriptor NodeID; then you need to define an associative property map as following: typedef map<NodeID, size_t> IndexMap; IndexMap mapIndex; associative_property_map<IndexMap> propmapIndex(mapIndex); 2) In the code, index all vertices as following: int ...


7

"normal" isn't found because your GLSL compiler was smart. It saw that you didn't actually do something with "normal", so it pretends it doesn't exist to save resources. Also, your normal and position should be vec3's since you're only passing 3 values. This isn't strictly required, but it is better form to make your inputs and attributes match.


7

Assuming that you have a manifold mesh, then the border of the mesh are those edges which belong to only one polygon. Edges that are not on the border will belong to two polygons. The border vertices are the vertices that belong to the border edges. A naive way to find the border vertices is to iterate through all your edges, count how many polygons they ...


7

varying vec4 pcolor; varying vec3 fNormal; varying vec3 v; varying mat4 modelMat; varying mat4 viewMat; varying mat4 projectionMat; varying vec2 texCoordinate; varying vec3 reflector; This is 17 total varying vectors. That's too many for most 2.1-class hardware (they generally only support 16). That's probably why it is "not working" when you uncomment ...


7

I'll be somewhat comprehensive here. The basic vertex array API has been core since OpenGL 1.1. OpenGL 1.1 introduced: glDrawArrays and glDrawElements (as well as glArrayElement, but really nobody should use that for anything ever) for rendering. glVertexPointer, glTexCoordPointer, glNormalPointer, and glColorPointer for "attributes". Note that you only ...


6

It's not a matter of calculating them per se, the normals are part of the artwork of the object. If you make each corner normal point "outward" from the cube it will have a sort of puffy, rounded appearance, while if you make them point squarely out (normal to the plane of that side of the cube) you'll have a sharply defined cube. If you had a more complex ...


6

Use a bodyHandler (here assuming you're posting JSON): req.bodyHandler(function(data) { var postData = JSON.parse(data.toString()); });


6

The builtin attribute arrays are not set with glVertexAttribPointer, but with functions like glVertexPointer, glColorPointer, .... And you enable these by calling glEnableClientState with constants like GL_VERTEX_ARRAY, GL_COLOR_ARRAY, ..., instead of glEnableVertexAttribArray. Whereas on nVidia glVertexAttribPointer might work, due to their aliasing of ...


6

Just flip v_texcoord. So e.g. v_texcoord = a_texcoord.st * vec2(1.0, -1.0); Or, I guess: v_texcoord = vec2(a_texcoord.s, 1.0 - a_texcoord.t); Depending on what exactly you want to happen to the range of .t.


6

From §4.3.5 of The OpenGL® ES Shading Language version 1.0.17 (PDF): The varying qualifier can be used only with the data types float, vec2, vec3, vec4, mat2, mat3, and mat4, or arrays of these. And from §4.3.3: The attribute qualifier can be used only with the data types float, vec2, vec3, vec4, mat2, mat3, and mat4. Attribute variables cannot ...


6

Typically, the copy operation from the client memory to the VBO can be faster if the source memory is aligned (the destination typically will be). It somewhat depends on how you do the upload to the VBO. That said, the upload will be the only thing that gets boosted by the alignment. Once the memory is in the VBO, it's the alignment of the VBO server memory ...


6

IndexBuffers are used for memory & speed optimizations. A indexBuffer is a list of indices that index the vertices in the vertexBuffer. So say I'm going to render a Flat Quad on the screen with 2 triangles. Each triangle takes up 3 vertices, so to render the quad with just a VertexBuffer I will need 6 vertices. Now if I use a IndexBuffer though, I ...


6

No, it is not possible to draw additional lines from a vertex shader. A vertex shader is not about creating geometry, it is about doing per vertex computation. Using vertex shaders, when you say glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLES,0,3), this is what specifies exactly what you will draw, i.e. 1 triangle. Once processing reaches the vertex shader, you can only alter ...



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