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19

You're going to need debugging information (PDB files) if you want to know the source file and column. That information doesn't get saved unless you ask for it. Unfortunately the profiler has no documentation that I can find. However, there are definitions for inclusive and exclusive when it comes to profiling: inclusive: total amount of time spent ...


6

The path to the original .pdb file is getting included in the DLL. Just don't move them. The source code for Very Sleepy is readily available. It uses the DbgHelp API, symbolinfo.cpp source code file. The call to SymInitialize() allows a tool to specify the the search path for symbols, 2nd argument. It passes NULL, that's where the buck stops.


6

I suppose we could divide reasons for slower performance on a virtual machine into two classes: 1. Configuration Skew This category is for all the things that have nothing to do with virtualization per se but where the configured virtual machine is not as good as the real one. A really easy thing to do is to give the virtual machine just one CPU core and ...


5

I'd like to optimize my code to satisfy timing constraints You're running smack into a persistent issue in this business. You want to find ways to make your code take less time, and you (and many people) assume (and have been taught) the only way to do that is by taking various sorts of measurements. There's a minority view, and the only thing it has ...


5

ntdll is the NT kernel functions. Chances are those are called internal to other functions to do low level operations, hence why you're seeing a lot of time spent in them - they're the sub-building-blocks of higher level functionality. Ignore them and look elsewhere (up the callstack) for performance tweaking; you're not likely to be able to get rid of the ...


4

The performance problem is probably that these functions are being called a lot, not in these functions themselves. You can guess from the names what they're used for. KiFastSystemCallRet in particular indicates your app went into Kernel mode. Ignore the ntdll functions in your profile, and focus only on the functions that you wrote/control.


4

I got an answer to this from Richard Mitton (@grumpydev), the maintainer of Very Sleepy, on twitter: "Most likely the function has been optimized, so the line number isn't matched up exactly to the code any more. i.e. all the time gets lumped at the start, instead of being spread out over the course of the function."


3

Are you sure you have symbols for ntdll? It's possible that you don't, and RtlpNtMakeTemporaryKey is just the closet exported symbol name that your debugger can see to the real function or functions that are taking up so much time. But yeah, you should focus on your code and who/why you're calling into ntdll so much.


3

Use a better profiler. On OS X, the CPU Instruments app that comes with Xcode gives excellent diagnostic information that makes spotting performance problems easy. What you want to see is the callstack during all this time. That will show you which library and function is calling that OS function all the time. Once you know that, it's simply a matter of ...


3

If you already have the PDB file, remember to keep it in the same directory it was generated. If you don't remember what directory it should be kept in, just open your .exe or .dll with a text/hex editor and scroll until the very end of the file, the pdb directory will be there. This is true, at least, if you're using MSVC6. I hope it helps.


2

Don't ignore it. Find out how it's being called. If you look back up the call stack to where it gets into your code, that will tell you where the problem is. It's important to halt it at random (not with a breakpoint), so that the stack traces that are actually costing a lot of time will be most likely to appear.


2

I've used GlowCode (commercial product, similar to Sleepy) for profiling native C++ code. You run the instrumenting process, then execute your program, then look at the data produced by the tool. The instrumenting step injects a little trace function at every methods' entrypoints and exitpoints, and simply measures how much time it takes for each function ...


1

No. Such a comparison is between two unlike things. Use sampling when to get accurate profiling you cannot afford overhead. Use instrumentation when you need to understand control flow over time.


1

This sounds like an internal function in Windows since it is in ntdll.dll. You should look at the call stack that reaches this function to find out why it is being invoked so often.


1

RtlCompareMemory / RtlFillMemory sound like they're probably the underlying implementations for memcmp() / memset(). Regardless, you want to change the settings of your profiler to show system call time under the calling app / library function so you can see where the calls are ultimately coming from.


1

Completely out of subject but I do recommend to use intel vtune a more user-friendly profiler. You can visualize both CPU utilization over time (by thread) and time spent in a particular function\line of code. But what actually amazed me was to be able to compare 2 different results, really useful to verify how a change influence performance. Give it a try, ...


1

Alternatively you can also launch the profiler first, then run your program via File/Launch... Shameless plug: You can use the modified version of 'Very sleepy' that allows you to start the profiling target w/ profiling paused, and with an API that allows you to start/stop profiling programmatically here: ...


1

If you're using Vista or Windows 7, you may need to run Very Sleepy as an Administrator so it can see (and list) the process.


1

That function is pretty meaningless for a profiler, it's basically the logical end point for a whole range of system functions. What functions do you have calling it? WaitForMultipleObjects? Asynch reads?



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