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230

The key to the solution is the message that the container has an active disk artifact and the advice to remove it from the repository. The procedure to remove the disk image from the blob repository is: Go to the Windows Azure Management Portal. Click on Virtual Machines. Click on Disks. Click on the disk. Click on Delete Disk. After that, the storage ...


28

OS X runs quite well in VMware after you've done the necessary tricks to get it to install in the first place. You don't get 3D acceleration but everything else is good. There are quite a few well written guides on how to get an installation going. eg. http://www.online-tech-tips.com/mac-os-x/install-snow-leopard-on-pc/


25

Unfortunately, and I really mean that, it is a violation of the OS X software license to virtualize any version of OS X Client on any hardware. OS X Server Snow Leopard and later may be virtualized on Apple Hardware and support exists in both VMware Fusion, Parallels, VirtualBox for doing so. None of them will virtualize OS X client. There are hacks which ...


13

Parallels is designed to import virtual machines rather than virtual hard disks. A VHD is just the hard disk, and doesn't specify anything about the machine. So the answer is that you need to create a simple virtual machine that uses the VHD; Parallels can then import that (for Parallels 7 see ftt's answer below). To do that, create a simple UTF-8 text file ...


12

Note 1: I'm running the XP IE6 VHD which expires today, 4/4/12 (this VHD can also be upgraded to IE7 and IE8 - I use all three in three separate VMs) under the Windows 7 version of Virtual PC - your mileage may vary. Note 2: As of today (the expiration date of the VHD), this VHD tells me it's expired upon login, and won't even get me to the desktop. If I ...


10

For Parallels 7, try this: $ /Library/Parallels/Parallels\ Service.app/Contents/PlugIns/Parallels\ VM\ Converter.app/Contents/MacOS/prl_convert your_disk_image.vhd Found here. The original post was about Parallels 6, so it should work there, too.


7

Go to virtual machines, then click on discs. Mark the disc and choose delete disc at the bottom. You can now choose if you want to keep or delete the corresponding vhd. It is important first to delete the disc via virtual machines not to delete via storage.


7

Just as the settings mention this setting turns on caching preferences for I/O. The effect of changing them is that reads, writes or both read/writes can be cached for performance. For example, if you have read-only database/Lucene index/read-only files it would be optimal to turn on read-cache for the drive. I have not seen dramatic performance changes ...


6

Unfortunately there is the case where the VM was deleted but Disks shows the VM attached to the blob (a 30GB VHD) precluding the deletion. Also there is the case of using the Azure Storage Explorer you find an orfan but leased VHD blob that can't be deleted and there is no reference on the Preview Portal.


6

Definitely! Just make a VSS snapshot of the volume, mount it as a drive letter, grab the VHD files, and put them somewhere else. Here's one I wrote a few years back: http://www.send4help.net/full-backups-of-running-hyper-v-guests-309 If I had to do it again though, I'd follow this method: ...


6

Make one simple change to your workflow: during sysprep, choose to Quit instead of shutdown. This completes the sysprep process but then just exits the sysprep app. tl;dr: run the following on the command line: c:\windows\system32\sysprep\sysprep.exe /generalize /oobe /quit At this point, you can simply select your running VM in the portal and shut it ...


5

Yes, it's possible. Within diskpart, you can issue the following command to create a differencing file based on your master VHD (drive letters and filenames are just for example): DISKPART> create vdisk file="D:\win7child1.vhd" parent="D:\win7master.vhd" And no reason why you couldn't run that command multiple times to build a collection of child images: ...


5

The VM sizes each have their own bandwidth limitations. | VM Size | Bandwidth | | ------------- |:-------------:| | Extra Small | 5 (Mbps) | | Small | 100 (Mbps) | | Medium | 200 (Mbps) | | Large | 400 (Mbps) | | Extra Large | 800 (Mbps) | I suspect you always have one copy of your mounted VHD and have ...


4

Try this: http://www.modern.ie Downloaded XP WITH IE 8 works for me.


4

Another option that I have been using is to use JkDefrag which is free. There is also a whole process on defragging a virtual PC, but since I can't find the "official" link in the JkDefrag forum, it goes something like this for command line parameters: Defrag the guest drive from within the virtual machine. Exit the virtual machine. On the host ...


4

I don't know if there's a managed API to do this, but there are a few examples of C# wrappers around some native methods: http://www.jmedved.com/2009/05/open-and-attach/ And since this wraps around the AttachVirtualDisk method I assume it should also work for Windows Server 2008 R2 (note that you'll need to set the osFamily of your role to 2 in order to ...


3

The most important thing when doing FPGA-designs is to think hardware. An FPGA consists of a number of hardware blocks, with a predetermined set of inputs and outputs - the code you write needs to be able to map to these blocks. So even if you write code that is syntactically correct, it doesn't mean that it can actually map to the hardware at hand. What ...


3

This is an old question but it still has no answer so I'll provide one in case someone stumble upon it like I did. Attaching the VHD For the complete Reference on MSDN [VHD Reference]: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/dd323700(v=vs.85).aspx OPEN_VIRTUAL_DISK_PARAMETERS openParameters; openParameters.Version = ...


3

Heres my solution, using VHDResizer and DISKPART on a Windows XP host. Download VHDResizer from hereFollowing these instructions from "Murnic" on this thread didnt work, on entering EXTEND, not sure on the exact wording now, but it was along the lines of cant extend this volume. The easiest way to do this (as long as you have enough hard drive space) is to ...


3

It is necessary to add synthetic disk (ResourceType.Disk, ResourceSubType.DiskSynthetic) using Msvm_VirtualSystemManagementService.AddVirtualSystemResources. Parent = SCSI controller's WMI path. ManagementObject synthetic = Utilities.GetResourceAllocationSettingData(scope, ResourceType.Disk, ResourceSubType.DiskSynthetic); synthetic["Parent"] = ...


3

Yes. Amazon supports importing several virtual machine and disk formats including VHD files. See http://aws.amazon.com/ec2/vmimport/


3

Defrag the guest, then the host. You can defrag just the vhd file on the host by using a utility like CONTIG. I don't believe you can defrag both at once, since the vhd file likely can't be in use in order to defrag it, requiring the VM to be off.


3

You don't. VHDL doesn't have include files, it avoids that whole horrid disastrous unreliable mess. VHDL uses separate compilation, and good VHDL tools (not all of them!) track all the dependencies correctly without includes or Makefiles. So you compile your other modules into a library - maybe "my_modules" - or if you don't specify a library, just ...


3

one thing to consider is the per-storage-account scalability target of a storage account. With georeplication enabled, you have 10Gbps egress and 20K transactions/sec, which you could be bumping into. Figure with 150 instances, you could potentially be pulling 150 x 100Mbps, or 15Gbps as all of your instances are starting up. Not sure about the "mounted ...


3

Just use this: $size = $intval / 1G PowerShell has a built-in constant (GB) for converting values to gigabytes. Also see here. Edit: reading your comment, I misunderstood your question it seems. New-vhd requires a size in bytes. If you want 10 GB, you cast the value like this: $size = [bigint] 10GB What's unclear in your question is this: "What I need ...


3

Take a look at discutils. Might be what you want. http://discutils.codeplex.com/


2

Here is the code I wrote in order to get around the odd little bug. #-------------------------------VHD CREATION-------------------------------------# #Create a VHD with a size of 3MB to get around variable bug New-VHD -Path $vhdpath -SizeBytes 3MB -Fixed #Resize to target dir + extra Resize-VHD -Path $vhdpath -SizeBytes $size #Mount/Format ...


2

The most comprehensive post I've seen about the caching options is this Windows Azure Storage Team blog post by Brad Calder. (Fixed link)


2

Brian has the right answer for you. Something I'd add which is related to your question in that it's something else people use include files for: packages are VHDL's way of sharing data-types, constants, functions and procedures.


2

You mount the VHD to say V: As VHD is Windows 8 you have to place Windows 8 boot files to active partition. (Windows 7 boot manager cannot boot Windows 8 !) "Dual-boot Repair" utility can help - you click a button "Automatic Repair" and you are done. You can also use following command to acomplish the task: bcdboot V:\Windows



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