Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

In VIM, it is possible with a single substitution. May not work in VI. :let @a=0 | v/^#/ s/\t\|$/\=setreg('a', len(submatch(0)) ? @a+1 : 0) || @a > 8 ? ',' : submatch(0)/g Explanation: let @a=0 : fill register a with value 0 v/^#/ : lines starting with a # are not affected s/\t\|$/.../g : replace every tab; make an additional replacement at end of ...


0

You can use :!sort to use the external Unix command line sort.


0

I wanted to do this in a single command, but it seems there is no way to replace all but the first eight occurrences of a pattern on the same line in VI/VIM. I did find a way to do what you want, but it takes 10 consecutive commands. :v/^#/ s/\t/<TAB>/ :v/^#/ s/\t/<TAB>/ :v/^#/ s/\t/<TAB>/ :v/^#/ s/\t/<TAB>/ :v/^#/ s/\t/<TAB>/ ...


0

Sounds like you want to delete, on each line, the first opening parenthesis and everything after. That would be: :%s/(.*//


1

In ex input mode you type line by line and see these lines at the bottom of the screen. When you done simply type a new line consist of single period (.). This will take you out of the ex input mode. Hope this help!


1

I use rebar all the time. In rebar.config, I have {deps,[ {sync, ".*", {git, "git://github.com/rustyio/sync", {tag,"master"}}}, } I use a .erlang file, typically placed in src/.erlang with the following two lines code:add_path("../deps/sync/ebin"). sync:go(). Now, whenever I save a file, it is reloaded. I see no reason why this ...


1

You can combine relx and rusty/sync for code reload while still running Erlang release. It works like charm and there are tutorials on how to do such setup.


0

To indent all file by 4: esc 4G=G


3

a.b is not one, but two keywords, because the . normally doesn't belong to the set of keyword characters. You have two options: Make . a keyword character. Use :set iskeyword+=. (Or :setlocal for a single buffer only. Also note that some filetype plugins may change that option.) Note that this affect motions like w, too, and may cause problems with syntax ...


2

This is possible. According to the manual, "*" / "#" use a whole word for the search, and there is a way to change what vim thinks is a word. The variable that contains that setting is iskeyword, and it defaults to values like @,48-57,_,192-255 or !-~,^*,^|,^",192-255. You can print your current setting with one of the following commands :set isk :set ...


1

See the help for 'iskeyword': *'iskeyword'* *'isk'* 'iskeyword' 'isk' string (Vim default for MS-DOS and Win32: "@,48-57,_,128-167,224-235" otherwise: "@,48-57,_,192-255" Vi default: ...


0

You can configure vi as SQLPlus editor with the statement DEFINE _EDITOR=vi (see the SQL*Plus User's Guide and Reference). If you get back just a ? you are probably using the old ed editor which you can quit by entering the q command (see its guide with man ed).


1

What you really want is a commenting plugin like commentary (which I use), Nerd Commenter, EnhCommentify, tComment, ..., etc. If you want to skip the plugin then you use these quick n' dirty mappings inspired by commentary: nnoremap <expr> gcc getline('.') =~ '^#' ? '0"_xw' : "gI#\<esc>w" xnoremap <expr> gc ':norm! ' . (getline("'<") ...


0

This is your chance to learn How to use macro?.Here are the steps: 1. Place your cursor at start line 2. In normal mode type "q" followed by any letter (name of macro) (say "qa"). 3. Now vim has started recording your macro. 4. Go to start of line by pressing "0" 5. Delete character under cursor by pressing "x" 6. Now go to next line by pressing "j". 7. ...


3

As its vim there are a few ways to do this. First Solution gg4 ctrl+v gg16 x gg4 to move the cursor onto the first character in line 8 (where the comment begins) ctrl+v to switch into visual block mode, in this mode you can select columns of text gg16 to move to the last line of the commented block, selecting the entire first column x deleting ...


1

The way I do which is quite handy is using <ctrl-v> (visual mode) and select the columns you want line by line. Then use x to delete the visually selected characters. You could do the same to insert characters in the beginning of each line as well.


0

Take a look at p6hot_deploy.erl It's what my company uses for simplistic auto-redeploy. it scans the filesystem once a second looking for modules where the date has changed and reloads them. so your process will be: edit, save, make This module will see the file change and force a reload it's not the fancy OTP way with releases and stuff, but a more low ...


0

In general, the solution is to use a capture. Put \(...\) around the part of the regex that matches what you want to keep, and use \1 to include whatever matched that part of the regex in the replacement string: s/\(s[w|l].*[0-9].*\)\.\*'$/\1\\.*'/ Since you're really just inserting a backslash between two strings that you aren't changing, you could ...


0

GNU Linux (see Greg's answer): ~/.vim/syntax/rust.vim Windows: C:\Program Files (x86)\Vim\vimfiles\syntax


0

For complex C++ files vim does not always get the formatting right when using '=' so for a such situations it is better to use an external C++ formatter like astyle (or uncrustify) e.g.: :%!astyle Vim's '=' function uses its internal formatter by default (which doesn't always gets things right) but one can also set it use an external formatter, like ...


0

You can also copy the current lines to your present cursor location using 't'. :81,91t.<enter> This will paste the lines 81-91 under the line the cursor is on. I learned this from http://vimcasts.org which is an excellent resource on VIM.


1

With .exrc, you can have directory-specific configuration. What you've read in that book probably assumes that you've segregated your different files into different directories. To differentiate different filetypes, you can set up autocmds on the FileType event in your .exrc file (just like some do globally in their ~/.vimrc, as an alternative to the ...


5

The \%c special atom is a zero-width match; i.e. it adds a restriction (on the byte count of the match) without consuming the character. To do this, append another atom that consumes it, e.g. . for any character match. Then, your substitution will work as expected: .s/\%3c.//g


0

In normal mode, you can type: 03lx 0 to go to the start of the line. 3l to move 3 characters forward. x to remove the character under the cursor.


3

select and yank as what you are doing, when you paste press P instead of p. The content in " register will be put before your cursor. also note that: with p or P, after your pasting, the cursor will stay at the beginning of the just pasted content. If you want your cursor to be at the end of pasted text, use gp or gP.


0

I think IC-r" could be close to what you want


2

Check the Git color settings. It looks like they're set to true for this particular user, but you want to use auto instead. The characters you're seeing are color codes for the terminal. With a color setting of auto, they shouldn't be visible when piping to vi. Check out a more detailed question/answer here: ...


3

^@ is a null and ^E is a transmission control character. Your sed command works just fine for me: $ sed "s/\"//g" file1 > file2 Something else must be going on. Is it possible these control characters exist in the original file? Exactly WHERE are the control characters showing up (could be a clue)? http://ascii-table.com/control-chars.php


0

A possible answer: :%s/\("[^"]*"\)/\=substitute(submatch(1), " ", "", "g")/g And the way I got it: Search what we want to replace => /".*" (quote symbol + n times whatever + quote symbol) Do it properly => /"[^"]*" (quote symbol + n times whatever is not a quote symbol + quote symbol) Transform that into a substitution that does nothing => ...


1

The problem was caused by starting an ex command with / rather than :. While forward slash will put you into ex command mode this particular issue of simple search and replace needed to be started with a colon.


0

That happens to me all the time, I open a root file for writing: Instead of losing all your changes and re-opening with sudo. See this demo of how to save those changes: One time Setup demo to create a root owned read only file for a lower user: sudo touch temp.txt sudo chown root:root temp.txt sudo chmod 775 temp.txt whoami el First open the file as ...


0

The g (global) suffix in the context regular expression substitution refers all matches for that line. This usage dates back to the time when editors were line-oriented. Vi is simply the visual mode of ex which Bill Joy wrote as a replacement for the venerable, ed. When running ex commands, using the percentage sign, % as the range for the command is ...


1

for searching multiple strings in vim you can do like: /search1\|search2 This works, and will highlight both "search1" & "search2", but with same color. You have to do this in vim editor.


0

This video under 3 minutes explains how to delete 1) All lines 2) multiple lines 3) lines after cursor and many more this coud be of great help i feel Click Here


0

press escape and then type below combinations fast: gg=G


1

The setting that controls whether <Tab> and autoindent insert tabs or spaces is " spaces set expandtabs " tabs set noexpandtabs This works in conjunction with tabstop, softtabstop and shiftwidth settings (you most likely want to keep these equal): set tabstop=4 softtabstop=4 shiftwidth=4 You can also abbreviate all of these: set et ts=4 sts=4 ...


1

use :-5s/^.\*$/Your Replacement/ That should work, and will move the cursor to that line


1

When you open vi, you are in command mode. Type i to place yourself in insert mode. make your edits then when you are finished use the escape key to toggle back to command mode. Then type :q! to exit without saving or ZZ to save and close. I believe barjomet is correct that as root, :wq! will allow you to write to a read only file. you might want to ...


0

You can edit read-only file as root with vi — just type :wq! when you finish. If you not familiar with vi and have vim installed — I recommend you to run vimtutor and spent about an hour to learn basics, otherwise read this short tutorial.


0

See comment of Peter Ricker. The solution is let mapleader = "\<cr>" :-) Happy Vimming!



Top 50 recent answers are included