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21

For the first Question: Your ViewController will receive didReceiveMemoryWarning method callback and you can nil out the view & other components in this method For Reference Do Check WWDC 2012 video Session on EVOLUTION OF VIEW CONTROLLER, in case you haven't (I Believe they are available only for registered developers, but not sure). Answer to your ...


13

My preferred method is now the following: - (void)didReceiveMemoryWarning { [super didReceiveMemoryWarning]; if (self.isViewLoaded && !self.view.window) { self.view = nil; } // Do additional cleanup if necessary } Note that the test self.isViewLoaded is essential, as otherwise accessing the view causes it to load - even the ...


12

According to Apple, they have improved the internal memory management for views enough that the gains achieved by destroying stuff in viewWill/DidUnload are minimal. Furthermore, they have data suggesting that many apps crash because the apps do not properly handle those notifications, and do "other" stuff not associated with the view unloading. Finally, a ...


9

I recommend you to use weak property for the IBOutlets like @property (weak) IBOutlet UILabel * labelText; That way you don't need to do anything in dealloc. In iOS 6, simply ViewDidUnload won't call, iOS5 or earlier it is just call when memory warning have occur.


8

I usually do my UIViewController observer registering in viewWillAppear and my removing in viewWillDisappear. viewWillDisappear seems like a safer choice to me than viewWillUnload since the latter method only gets called in low-memory situations on iOS versions older than 5.0. The most appropriate answer probably depends on what your view controller is ...


8

In iOS 6, views are never unloaded. This means that loadView and viewDidLoad are only ever called once, and viewDidUnload is never called. So if your view controller uses viewDidUnload to handle low memory conditions then it will need to change. If you want to respond to low memory conditions, implement didReceiveMemoryWarning and release your ...


7

1- Is there a definitive reason why or why not to tell super that the viewDidUnload? Honestly I don't know the consequences of not calling it. You can try to not call it and everything works smooth, but imagine that Apple adds some importante piece of code that will run when [super viewDidUnload] is called, what will happen now? Bad things will happen ...


6

In iOS 6 we should release views by ourself, do something like this - (void)didReceiveMemoryWarning { [super didReceiveMemoryWarning]; if([self isViewLoaded] && self.view.window == nil) { self.view = nil; } }


6

It really depends on the role of the class where you subscribe to NSNotificationCenter notifications. If you are subscribing in: UIView Then you should unsubscribe as soon as view gets invisible to the user. To save CPU cycles and not consume resources while user does not see the view. UIViewController Here it also depends on kind of action that you are ...


5

If you read the viewDidUnload documentation, you see that it's related to low memory conditions and may be called to help with that. There is also a viewWillUnload that get's called before the view is released. It's also related to low memory. If you're only interested in when the view is no longer seen, there are will/did disappear methods.


5

The -dealloc is correct and the -viewDidUnload will work, but typically retained views are only nilled in -viewDidUnload and not released. This seems to be Apple's practice as well and it is what they've baked into the Xcode when you create an auto-generated IBOutlet via the Assistant editor. For auto-generated IBOutlets, the auto-generated -viewDidUnload ...


4

In the iOS reference for viewDidUnload:, it states that this is deprecated for iOS 6 because Views are no longer purged under low-memory conditions and so this method is never called It doesn't say anything about placing this code in didReceiveMemoryWarning:. Since views are no longer purged under low memory conditions, you never have to worry about ...


4

I do call super last in destructors and first in constructors. viewDidUnload is kind of destructor so I would call it last. But in this case it's matter of taste. Also, just side note - viewDidUnload is deprecated since iOS 6.


4

I assume that you added the observer in viewDidLoad. The problem is that on iOS 6 views are not unloaded, even in a low memory situation. Therefore, if you remove the observer in didReceiveMemoryWarning, viewDidLoad will not be called again. There are two relative simple alternatives that you can choose from: Add the observer in viewWillAppear and remove ...


4

I figured out a command for Vim, I'm sure it'll make your life easier. ;) Open Vim in desired root dir (generally, it'll be your root dir of your all controller files), press Shift : to enter command-line mode, run the command below: :args **/*.m | argdo %s/^-\ (void)viewDidUnload\_.\{-}}\n^$\n//ge | update This will replace all - (void)viewDidUnload { ...


3

I don't know it is OK to answer to my own question, but maybe I found an answer for this. http://osdir.com/ml/cocoa-dev/2011-02/msg00430.html It says that we should preserve BarButtonItems in viewDidUnload, and load it in viewDidLoad. It seems working fine. - (void)viewDidUnload { [super viewDidUnload]; self.toolbarItems = self.toolbar.items; // ...


3

it is not the view controller that is unloaded when viewDidUnload is called but only its view. The view controller stays alive until it is deallocated. In viewDidUnload, you have to release those objects that are part of the view and everything that can and will be recreated in viewDidLoad (because viewDidLoad will be called again when the view controller ...


3

The problem is viewDidUnload is not guaranteed to be called every time like dealloc method. (check this question). The reason to release objects in viewDidUnload is to avoid memory leaks. Since viewDidUnload is called when there's a low memory warning, you do want to clean up to avoid troubles in that case. And also calling release on nil will not cause ...


3

Why not just run (a) the static analyser (b) Instruments with the leak tool enabled or (c) use ARC?


3

A UITabBarController and UINavigationController are based on fundamentally different paradigms. The UITabBarController is intended for the UIViewController on each tab to exist independently of each other and for the user to choose which they want to view. viewDidLoad only gets called once for each UIViewController because it is intended that each tab ...


3

ViewDidUnload is not an option - it's deprecated and won't be called (since a long time ago - e.g. maybe since iOS5?). iOS doesn't really provide a general ViewController override for when the ViewController is "no longer used". However, if you have control of the ViewControllers in your app - e.g. if you are using a NavigationController which never reuses ...


2

self.someView = nil will not leak since it equals to [self setSomeView:nil] which is generated automatically by property-synthesize pair of @property(nonatomic, retain)UIView *someView. It has retain attribute so the retained object will be released when a new object is set. I believe [someDict release]; should be in dealloc. And [someOtherView release]; ...


2

viewDidUnload is used to release anything that you might have made when the view is created - this included things in viewDidLoad but also includes and IBOutlet properties that are created from inside a xib file. these should all be released and set to nil in viewDidUnload. Anything else should just be released in dealloc. The idea is that if viewDidUnload ...


2

viewDidUnload is like dealloc in that you are "shutting down" your object -- you're freeing up memory and putting it into a (semi-)inactive state. The recommended pattern in Cocoa is to do [super dealloc] at the end of your subclass's dealloc because you need to make sure that all the stuff you've added to the class can get released before your instance is ...


2

As the other mentioned viewDidUnload: is deprecated in iOS 6. But as additional information you should know, that it is seldom necessary to unload a UIView since iOS 6 is doing its magic thingie in the background -it is destroying the bitmap layer of the backing CALayer of the view (which is by far the biggest "part" of a UIView). If the view is needed again ...


2

You haven't given much information about how you "unload" SecondViewController. Are you doing a modal segue to it as well? If so, that's your problem -- every time you do a segue, you instantiate a new view controller, and if these are modal segues, the presented controller has a strong pointer to the presenting controller, so none of these controllers will ...


2

ARC (automatic reference counting) features is available in iOS 5 and ahead (iOS 6 and so on..) version. When you are using ARC unable in your project, you dont need to `manually release any object` that you have allocated for your stuff. ARC will automatic handle this one.so it will beneficial for `Memory Management`. Hope ,You understand what i m ...


1

If you cannot use a fetched results controller, you could register for the NSManagedObjectContextObjectsDidChangeNotification: [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(contextChanged:) name:NSManagedObjectContextObjectsDidChangeNotification object:theManagedObjectContext]; and reload the data only if ...


1

From what I understand, the viewDidUnload method is called by didRecieveMemoryWarning function in the UIViewController (the super class). Basically iOS gives you couple of warnings and expect to see your memory usage go down. If you continue to ignore these, OS will kill your app. Sometimes, though, it is critical to keep some views up and running so the ...


1

After a call to viewDidUnload, a UIViewController should maintain its state, i.e. not releasing anything that cannot be easily recreated. Usually you set to nil any data that is related to the view hierarchy, for example strong references to some subviews or custom data created in the viewDidLoad. In you example, your parent controller A is expected to be ...



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