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77

Intro In MVVM the usual practice is to have the Views find their ViewModels by resolving them from a dependency injection (DI) container. This happens automatically when the container is asked to provide (resolve) an instance of the View class. The container injects the ViewModel into the View by calling a constructor of the View which accepts a ViewModel ...


14

You are not assigning any IDataService to the MainViewModel here. You are registering a type mapping, so your container will be aware that it should return a DataService whenever an IDataService required. This is related to dependency injection http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dependency_injection The DI container auto-wires the dependencies, so when you need ...


6

There are two different approaches, and not one "right way". The approach that a ViewModelLocator or similar helps with is a "View-First" approach to developing MVVM. By this, it means you start with your View in the designer, and then build the ViewModel to match. Logically, Views often create other Views, and the ViewModel is typically loaded via some ...


4

Thanks for updating your question to provide much more information. Using the MvvmCross approach to cross-platform development enables you to leverage native UI platforms. This does mean that you - the developer - do need to learn a bit about these platforms - and one of the key things to understand is the "view" lifecycle, including when used in navigation ...


3

Typically you would use some kind of messaging system, such as Prism's EventAggregator or MVVM Light's Messenger. Both systems remind me of a paging system: any part of the application can broadcast messages, and any part of the application and subscribe to listen for messages. So your DoubleClick command would broadcast a LoadItemMessage containing the ...


3

adding the resource to the UserControl's resources itself should do the trick; in fact pretty much every Wpf element has a Resources property. <UserControl.Resources> <t:ViewModelLocator x:Key="viewModelLocator" Container="{x:Static app:ConfigurationPlugin.Container}" /> </UserControl.Resources>


2

You want UI elements to have a good design-time experience (including in Blend). That sounds like a reasonable goal. Let’s look at what a UI element is. For the rest of this answer I’m going to call it a Control. The responsibility of a Control is to render UI and respond to user events. Insofar as it should have behavior, it should only have behavior that ...


2

Precisely for this purpose I have created a small demo application. It defines a ViewModelLocator class: public class ViewModelLocator { private readonly IContainer container; public ViewModelLocator() { var containerBuilder = new ContainerBuilder(); containerBuilder.RegisterType<MainViewModel>(); ...


2

Mike, Add the following to your XAML.. xmlns:designTime="clr-namespace:MyDesignTimeNS;assembly=MyBinaryName" d:DataContext="{d:DesignInstance designTime:DesignTimeObjectNameViewModel, IsDesignTimeCreatable=True} With this, I'm able to keep my design time data in a separate binary and not distribute it.


1

We use ViewModelLoader/ViewModelLocator to provide both DesignTime as well as Runtime DataContexts. ViewModelLocator Class public static class ViewModelLocator { public static readonly DependencyProperty FactoryProperty = DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("Factory", typeof (IViewModelFactory), typeof (ViewModelLocator), new ...


1

The code you show us is an ItemTemplate as a ressource. The data is bound in the listbox. In there you bind to the SelectedFriend. <ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding Friends}" ItemTemplate="{StaticResource FriendItemTemplate}" SelectedItem="{Binding SelectedFriend, Mode=TwoWay}" /> The DataContext property is used, when no other data ...


1

That is a problem with ViewModelLocator (to pass the parameters to ViewModel from View xaml). What you can do is Create a Property Parameter of Type object or (of type your SelectedItem) in ViewModelLocator class. Bind this to the SelectedItem of your Grid and then pass it to your new ViewModel. I hope this will help. NOte: If you create the property of type ...


1

I will recommend you to use any type of IoC container for that (for example Unity) public class ViewModelLocator { public static UnityContainer Contaner { get; private set;} static ViewModelLocator() { Container = new UnityContainer(); Container.RegisterType<ProductListViewModel>(new ContainerControlledLifetimeManager()); ...


1

I believe I have found the answer to my original question, in addition to the one raised in my comments discussion with flq. First, the answer to the original question is that the proper way to close the Window is along the lines of what I did in my described "workaround". Closing an app is a View-initiated process, as it is the Window control that has the ...


1

Ok the reason why it don't works is my childWindow is created inside the ctor of an IApplicationService. This popupService is declared in the App.xaml: <Application.Resources> <ResourceDictionary> <vm:ViewModelLocator xmlns:vm="clr-namespace:Client.ViewModel" x:Key="Locator" /> ...


1

There is no trick to binding a child window to a static view model using the locator pattern. My guess is your DataContext is wrong. Check: Make sure you have an "AddAlert" property defined in your locator class. Something like: private static AddAlertViewModel _AddAlertViewModel; /// <summary> /// Gets the ViewModelPropertyName ...


1

Gennerally a child container defines a lookup hierarchy. However, your base container will have to create your child container - passing itself as a parameter. In order to access the child container your can have a property that returns the child container - either a singleton instance or a transient (i.e. new) instance. If you want blendability you ...



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