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6

Wasn't so hard to google the wiki. :%s/.*\zs,/\t/ or :%s/.*\zs,/^I/ :s/old/new/ is the syntax, but vim has aditional features for searching and replacing in particular, \zsfoobar\ze let's you select foobar for replacing. In your example .*, like in any regex, means any character any number of times, or just "some text that is as long as possible", ...


5

Vimdiff isn't launching because there is no such conflict to resolve. It is just a case of a file being there in one branch and not being there in another. Git is simply asking which file to keep, the created one or the deleted one.


5

There's vi'<Esc>, which goes into visual mode with the selection comprising the interior of the current string, and the cursor at the end of the selection — then leaves visual mode. I'm not sure if there's a better way.


4

You could run gvim in background as any other process: gvim [file] & After executing this command you receive a message indicating the pid of the new process. When you end it you should receive a similar message on that shell. Edit: The ctrl-z/fg problem is probably related to windows. This question states that GitBash would create a new shell ...


3

Fo the sake of diversity: :%norm $F,r<C-v><Tab> move to the end of the line jump to first comma to the left replace it with a <Tab>.


3

CTRL-L puts vim back into normal mode. Then :q to quit or :q! to quit without saving.


3

the region from the line following <<END_SCRIPT to the next instance of END_SCRIPT at the beginning of a line is a heredoc, which is basically a multiline string literal. vim highlights it as such, because a heredoc can honestly just contain arbitrary data and there's no good way for vim to know what to do with it out of the box.


3

As ChrisNbg pointed out there is even a document called Packaging of Vim Addons out there. Nice! :) IMHO it is ok if a package installs files into a folder exposed by another package it depends on. It is not just OK, it is quite common and I don't see another way to create a package which allows other packages as plugins - it must expose a folder where ...


3

BufWritePre are run only when the buffers are actually written. :w forces write, while :wall doesn't, it only writes those buffers that are modified. If you want to force writing all buffers (modified or not) you can do something like :bufdo w. This will also run BufWritePre and friends.


2

inoremap <Esc>m <Esc>


2

Try something like this: syn region dash start=/^\s*\zs-/ end=/$/ oneline syn region dash start=/^/ end=/:\ze\s*$/ oneline highlight link dash String


2

You get an error 127 which means "invalid command" because when you type :!q it calls an external command: Here you're trying to execute the command q in your shell which doesn't exist. To force quit the command is :q! but if :wq doesn't work maybe that means that you don't have the permissions to edit your file. If that's the case you should use sudoedit ...


2

In the past, the Python ftplugin only took care of "generic" stuff but a semi-recent update added indentation settings in an effort to enforce PEP8 compliance: " As suggested by PEP8. setlocal expandtab shiftwidth=4 softtabstop=4 tabstop=8 A clean way to override those settings would be to add the lines below to ~/.vim/after/ftplugin/python.vim: setlocal ...


2

Use setlocal to set that to just the buffer you want. au filetype python setlocal colorcolumn=80 You can also abbreviate it to setl au filetype python setl colorcolumn=80


2

You can combine commands in command mode with pipes, which is similar to how you are doing it with multiple command line arguments. As such, try this: vim +"%s/fafa//gne|exec getchar()|q" /tmp/1 Without the bit in the middle, it does exactly the same as your original example. However, the exec getchar() command is a bit of VimScript that -- how used here ...


2

Press the % key. See also the help at :h netrw-createfile


2

Vim's "easy mode" is a very different beast than regular Vim/Vi. Easy mode goes out of it's way to try and make Vim modeless which is heresy as far as I am concerned. If you do want to learn some Vim commands then I suggest you take 20 minutes or so and run vimtutor. It will teach you the some basic Vim commands. I would also suggest making a cheat sheet if ...


2

Align on the first word :Tabularize/^\s*\w\+/ For more help see: :h tabular.


2

The easiest way would be t', but this would only work if the string ends on the same line and there are no escaped quotes in the string. The cleanest way to achieve this would be as @hobbs already pointed out to use visual mode to select the whole (inside) text object (vi'<Esc>). With o (before hitting <Esc>) you can also toggle the end of this ...


2

You could update your shell environment, using a function like this: function activate () { if [ $# -eq 0 ]; then # no arguments passed to the function (default case) source f1/bin/activate elif [ $# -eq 1 ]; then # one argument passed to the function source "$1"/bin/activate # argument value read from $1 fi }


2

So, as FDinoff suggested, the patch here really works for me.


2

The command filetype indent plugin on will indent automatically based on filetypes using what's in your indent folder. There are lots of options that you can manually change (such as cindent and the like) but the above command will take care of most of that for you and actually changing cindent or smartindent yourself can mess things up a bit in my ...


2

Have you tried this? " Start NERDTree autocmd VimEnter * NERDTree " Jump to the main window. autocmd VimEnter * wincmd p It seems to me, based on your .vimrc, that you are opening NERDTree. You just want to jump to the other window afterwards.


1

git clone git@github.com:Raimondi/delimitMate.git works just fine In a terminal, but not with Plug. According to the Plug FAQ you're supposed to either use the https URLs, or, if you insist on using SSH URLs, set g:plug_url_format to git@github.com:%s.git.


1

What you see is exactly what you are supposed to see when doing $ vim .: the built-in netrw plugin displays a listing of the current directory that you can use to navigate your project. If you don't want that listing, don't ask for it: $ vim or: $ vim file


1

:%s/,\([^,]*\)$/ \1 Explanation : ........ command % ........ entire file / ........ start searching , ........ comma \( ....... opening regex group [^,]* .... anything but comma \) ....... closing regex group $ ........ at the end of line / ........ end search Ctrl-v TAB .... to insert tab \1 ...... back reference to regex group


1

got the solution. at the navigation mode, using command: 0dl or even simpler 0x


1

Try using the following (after pressing escape) :wq! Should work.


1

You can do this with the -c option (or just +) like this: vim -c "%s/ffff//gn" vim +"%s/ffff//gn" From the manpage: +{command} -c {command} {command} will be executed after the first file has been read. {command} is interpreted as an Ex command. If the {command} contains spaces it must be enclosed in double ...


1

javac is the compiler, not the executor. It will compile your source code into a class file which then needs to be run with java rather than javac.



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