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1

That sounds correct since it seems you are assuming only 1-level of page table in VA to PA translation. This calculation would change if you go for 2-level or 3-level page table translation and based on number of levels and number of entries in each level VA bits would be split.


2

I'm not going to watch an 83-minute video lecture just to get the exact definitions of terms like PageTblPtr, but I'll try to provide some general answers: Modern operating systems don't use segmentation. It's just a big flat address space, and all the segment selectors are set to encompass the whole thing. I don't think x86 processors even support ...


0

Short answer: Depends on the system. Most 32-bit systems have a limitation of 2GB per process. If your system allows >2GB per process, then we can move on to the next part of your question. Most modern systems use Virtual Memory. Yet, there are some constrained (and various old) systems that would just run out of space and make you cry. I believe uClinux ...


2

This is HIGHLY platform dependent. On many 32bit OS's, no single process can ever use more than 2GB of memory, regardless of the physical memory installed or virtual memory allocated. For example, my work computers use 32bit Linux with PAE (Physical Address Extensions) to allow it to have 16GB of RAM installed. The 2GB per process limit still applies ...


1

A 64-bit process needing 4GB on a 64-bit OS can generally run in 2GB of physical RAM, by using virtual memory, assuming disk swap space is available, but performance will be severely impacted if all of that memory is frequently accessed. A 32-bit process can't address exactly 4GB of memory in practice (some address space overhead is required by the ...


1

The wording is confusing, but it's not saying pfr(LRU(S))==pfr(OPT(S)), because that's clearly not true. It's saying that they display the same characteristics because LRU(S) is effectively OPT(Sr), so pfr(LRU(S))==pfr(LRU(Sr)). So your analysis is correct: they have different page fault rates.


2

Yes, a module handle value in Windows is simply the base address of the VM allocation for the module. So you can cast the MEMORY_BASIC_INFORMATION.AllocationBase you get back to (HMODULE) and pass that to GetModuleFileName(). Of course, do keep in mind that this only works for allocations that were made for code loaded from executable files. You normally ...


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Functions like writev allow to submit discontiguous requests, and pages in high memory do not have a virtual address to begin with. To access SG list contents with the CPU, use something like sg_copy_from_buffer, which automatically maps the pages temporarily.


2

Typically the L1 TLB access time will be less than the cache access time to allow tag comparison in a set associative, physically tagged cache. A direct mapped cache can delay the tag check by assuming a hit. (For an in-order processor, a miss with immediate use of the data would need to wait for the miss to be handled, so there is no performance penalty. ...


0

Have you looked at CPAN? There are modules on there that do exactly what you want. You will most likely have to use two different modules for Linux and Windows. the Win32::Modules provide a lot of these tools for you to do these tasks easily on windows. On Linux you can use modules to make it easier or just use perl to parse the kernel response from ...


0

You want to read and parse stuff from the /proc directory, which is a kernel interface. man proc lists a lot of the files and their contents. So some of the stuff you are interested in will be in /proc/meminfo, various cpu stats are in /proc/stat, etc. Virtual memory is per process, and every existant process has a directory keyed by pid in /proc, e.g., ...


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Looks like env2 runs 64-bit Java (OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM) while env1 Java is 32-bit. Check /proc/PID/smaps - it gives the full map of process virtual address space.


1

Normally every address issued (for x86 architecture) is a logical address which is translated to a linear address via the segment tables. After the translation into linear address, it is then translated to physical address via page table. A nice article explaining the same in depth: http://duartes.org/gustavo/blog/post/memory-translation-and-segmentation/


0

It will be a 32 bit virtual address in most cases. If your OS supports does paging then it would be the virtual address. It could have been mapped to the same physical address using paging. Linux and Windows do paging. Another thing that matters is the architecture. On Intel x86 32bit system it will be 32 bit address. The first 10 bits of the address will ...


4

In most typical cases (Windows, Linux, etc.) it'll be a virtual address. In the typical cases like Linux and Windows, both virtual addresses and physical addresses are normally 32 bits, so having numbers in the same range becomes inevitable. It is possible to allocate more than 4 gigabytes of memory, and when/if you do so, you end up with addresses larger ...


4

The address is going to be a virtual address in virtual memory, because the application has no knowledge of physical memory. That is hidden by the kernel and the MMU. I am not sure what you mean by the same "bit range". If you have a 32-bit address space it will range across the entire 32-bit space regardless of what amount of physical memory you have. ...


0

Sounds like a TLB issue to me, whereby p2 has the virtual address of the data cached in hardware. Has p2 previously read/written the page in it's address space before p1 changes the value? Try invoking this in p1 after you change the value: flush_tlb_page(struct vm_area_struct * vma, unsigned long address)


0

1) Why do we need virtual memory management to only load part of a program? Why could we not load part of a program using physical addresses? Some of us are old enough to remember 32-bit systems with 8MB of memory. Even compressing a small image file would exceed the physical memory of the system. It's likely that the paging aspect of virtual memory ...


0

There are a number of advantages to using virtual memory over strictly physical memory, some of which you've already listed. Basically it allows your programs to just use memory without having to worry about where it comes from or what else might be competing for it. It makes memory appear to be flat and contiguous, even if it's spread out across various ...



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