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65

Let's compare two examples, one development environment that uses source control, and one that doesn't. A: Does Use B: Does not Use Scenario 1: A project is requested, completed, and rolled out A + B) Programmers develop the project internally, when it's completed, push it out to testing, and then deliver to the client (whoever that may be) Not much ...


54

This can't be done in the normal VSS 2005 "Set Working Folder" dialog. However, if you hold the shift key while invoking the "Set Working Folder" dialog, it shows the old VSS 6.0 dialog. Here you can reset the working folder by deleting the string and pressing OK.


53

Reliability SVN is a lot more reliable with large databases SVN is still actively supported Atomic commit - in VSS when you get latest version while another user is performing checkin, you can get an inconsistent state, forcing you to repeat the "Get latest version" in better case, but sometimes when unlucky you may be left with a codebase which compiles ...


51

First, teach them how to use SourceSafe in an efficient way. If they are smart enough, they will begin to love the advantages of using a version-control system, and if so, they will soon reach the limits of SourceSafe. That's where they will be the more able to listen to your arguments for switching to a better VCS, could it be a CVCS or a DVCS, depending ...


40

SVN is more popular than VSS and has lot's of advantages. VSS is old and outdated. Why Not VSS Visual SourceSafe: Microsoft's Source Destruction System Source Control: Anything But SourceSafe Visual SourceSafe Version Control: Unsafe at any Speed? Many developers nowdays are moving from VSS to SVN. If you will search for "SVN" and "VSS" in Google, it ...


33

“Visual SourceSafe? It would be safer to print out all your code, run it through a shredder, and set it on fire.” - (Attributed to an unidentified Microsoft employee). SourceSafe has many problems and no redeeming features. There are several freely available, cross-platform alternatives that are safer, faster and more powerful. Subversion is probably ...


31

Try deleting your .user and .suo files - these are the user options files that VS creates. You get a .user file for each project and a .suo file for your solution. When they get corrupted, odd things happen. Deleting them will make you lose little things like which project is selected as the startup project when you start debugging, but it usually clears up ...


31

You cannot directly compare TFS and a DVCS. If your company leans toward TFS, that may be because of the other features TFS comes with (data collection, reporting, and project tracking, all well integrated with Microsoft products) On the pure Version-Control side (TVFS), the Team Foundation Server 2010, with its Team Foundation Version Control (TFVC) ...


27

I'd probably go with Subversion, if I were you. I'm a total Git fanatic at this point, but Subversion certainly has some advantages: simplicity abundance of interoperable tools active and supportive community portable Has really nice Windows shell integration integrates with visual studio (I think - but surely through a third party) Git has many, many ...


26

I recommend just adding your code to a new Subversion repository rather than importing from VSS. VSS has a convoluted version control model that doesn't translate well to many other systems, and just starting fresh is usually the best way to avoid taking that clutter with you. If you need to keep the history around, make your VSS repository read-only.


26

Just use SVN and an excellent TortoiseSVN client which integrates with the Windows Explorer. P.S. Found this question: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/63957/what-is-the-best-set-of-tools-to-develop-win32-delphi-applications and this Delphi IDE/TortoiseSVN integration tools in one of the answers: http://delphiaddinfortortoisesvn.tigris.org/


26

It's well-known to corrupt data. There are many better alternatives. If you need to match the feature-set and GUI, check out Vault from SourceGear. Free alternatives are numerous --- from the ubiquitous svn to the more modern (distributed) git, mercurial, etc. Also, TFS is the MS replacement -- if you want MS tools, at least use TFS.


24

Use source control because neither you nor your team are perfect. The primary function of source control is to ensure that you have a complete historical record of your development process. Having this record, you have the ability to confidently branch out with "experimental" versions, knowing that if the experiment fails, you can back up to an earlier ...


23

This is the single best source control pattern that I have come across. It emphasizes the importance of leaving the trunk free of any junk (no junk in the trunk). Development should be done in development branches, and regular merges (after the code has been tested) should be made back into the trunk (Pic 1), but the model also allows for source to be ...


22

Find some excuse to start using non-ASCII characters in your C# code (Chinese and Japanese are excellent for this). SourceSafe doesn't like Unicode (even though Visual Studio does), so if you choose the right Unicode text and check a file in and back out, your entire file will appear as corrupted gibberish. The beauty of this is that because SS uses a ...


21

I'm the author of vss2git. If your version history doesn't involve lots of actions unique to VSS, like shares and archives, your repository should migrate without problems. I've made a number of fixes in those areas based on feedback from other users, so there's a reasonable chance of success even if it does. I should point out that the number of commits to ...


19

As far as I know you have to use the get command at a command prompt, not the gui. Something like this should do: ss Get "$/AFolder" -R -Vd15-03-2009;2:00a The -R option makes the get recursive and the -vd option gets the version at the specified date.


17

Simply - so you have a true history of the code - to investigate changes (reasons for bugs), revert to versions, audit, etc. Backup isn't enough - you simply have a copy of the current picture. Ever change a file and wish you could remember what you did?


17

See: List of Source Control Systems with Visual Studio Plugins Visual Studio is just an IDE. You can use any source control solution that you want with it. Any open source source control solution in particular, like git, mercurial (hg) or subversion (svn). And there are commercial products like Perforce or SourceGear Vault. See here for a pretty ...


16

Jeff Atwood has a nice post: Anything But SourceSafe There is no excuse for using VSS when there are other solutions such as SVN, Git and Mercurial which are better both in terms of reliability and use more modern approach then VSS.


16

There were two features that we used to sell management and the team on SVN over VSS. 1) The ability to branch. When using VSS, when a release was scheduled to go out, the entire repository was locked until the release actually went out. This included the test and fix cycle. So, developers were unable to commit anything other than fixes for the release ...


16

VSS totally relies on the clients to manage the database. If a client drops connection in the middle of a write over the network at just the wrong time, your file is trashed on the server. Not just the tip, but all the history. Hope you have a good backup. I've been through it. It's bad news. VSS usage over VPN or other remote connections is abysmal. It's ...


16

Microsoft has admitted to never using VSS on any of their internal projects (can't find the reference right now though :/). I used it for two years and it was stupid bad. Database was corrupted at least once a week. Also, one of my favorite things to quote to VSS users is the first quote on Eric Wadworth's page, reportedly from someone at Microsoft: ...


16

Empirically, it makes no sense to trust your precious source code to a piece of software that isn't even up to the level of reliability as Microsoft Access. The product should have been dumped years ago. It's just not up to modern standards. I'd rate it below any open source product like CVS or SVN, and I don't know of any product I'd rate below it, except ...


15

Perforce can be a good compromise in term of features/price. It is a centralized VCS (as opposed to Mercurial or Git: Distributed VCS), which is fine for an enterprise. It does has an integration with Visual Studio. As mentioned by Simon O. in the comments, Perforce is very centralized (not much will work offline), so you need to have the right ...


15

just make sure you stay the hell away from visual source safe.


15

You have to use Source Control for these reasons 1) You can rollback to any version 2) Different developers can work on the same files 3) All developers, will have access to the same code base 4) You can track changes 5) You can rollback changes that don't work 6) Source control is the basis of continuous integration and helps massively with TDD 7) If ...


15

"The solution is in Tools/Options/Source Control\Environent Uncheck the box for "Don't show check in dialog box when checking items in"" From: http://www.developmentnow.com/g/55_2010_5_0_0_670513/checking-into-source-control-now-says-checkIn-Now-recursive.htm


14

VSS is the worst Version Control tool out there, please don't go back there. If TFS is really not your thing (and that's fair enough) then you should consider Subversion, or a DVCS such as Mercurial or git. If you like the simplicity of VSS then Sourcegear's "Vault" might be worth investigating. I've never used it in anger but it's very similar to VSS in ...


14

We use SVN for our .Net projects, using the Tortoise SVN client. There are also tools to integrate with Visual Studio such as Ankhsvn.



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