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11

Before the 6.0 version VxWorks only supported kernel execution environment for tasks and did not support processes, which is the traditional application execution environment on OS like Unix or Windows. Tasks have an entry point which is the address of the code to execute as a task. This address corresponds to a C or assembly function. It can be a symbol ...


11

There are two: gcc and diab. They will be provided with your WindRiver platform (such as "General Purpose Platform 3.6"). The gcc is modified by WindRiver (and/or CodeSourcery) to work with VxWorks. Now with VxWorks 6.9 there is a third option: Intel C++ compiler (for Intel target architectures only, 32 and 64 bit) -- diab will not target 64-bit


10

The simple answer is that vxWorks takes control through a hardware interrupt from the system timer that occurs continually at fixed intervals while the system is running. Here's more detail: When vxWorks starts, it configures your hardware to generate a timer interrupt every n milliseconds, where n is often 10 but completely depends on your hardware. The ...


8

I believe the following would account for lots of the difference: No Paging/Swapping A deterministic RTOS simply can't swap memory pages to disk. This would kill the determinism, since at any moment you could have to swap memory in or out. vxWorks requires that your application fit entirely in RAM No Processes In vxWorks 5.5, there are tasks, but no ...


7

In VxWorks, each task that utilises floating point has to be specified as such in the task creation so that the FP registers are saved during context switches, but only when switching from tasks that use floating point. This allows non-floating point tasks to have faster context switch times. When an interrupt pre-empts a floating point task however, it is ...


7

This is architecture dependent. From the VxWorks Kernel Programmer's Guide (v6.8): All ISRs use the same interrupt stack. [...] CAUTION: Some architectures do not permit using a separate interrupt stack, and ISRs use the stack of the interrupted task. [...] See the VxWorks reference for your BSP to determine whether your architecture supports ...


7

In order to give an answer that makes sense, let's review some concepts first. Most modern processors have a Memory Management Unit (MMU) which is used for a number of purpose. One purpose is to map between the Virtual Address (the one the CPU "sees") and the Physical Address (where the chips are actually connected). This is called address translation. ...


6

Socket creation rarely fails except for invalid parameters or extremely low-resources conditions (but in those cases generally nothing works so attempting recovery is an impossible mission). What can fail at runtime is for example a listen call because another process already is listening on the same port. In windows socket creation most commonly fails ...


6

it is an arm, go look at the arm documentation you will see that for the 32 bit (non-thumb) arm instructions the first four bits are the condition code. The code 0b1110 is "ALWAYS" most of the time you dont do conditional execution so most arm instructions start with 0xE. makes it very easy to pick out an arm binary. the 16 bit thumb instructions also ...


6

Can we ignore the second sentence in your question? It is meaningless, and perhaps points to a misunderstanding of design patterns. The first part is interesting however. That said, I would generalise it to cover real-time systems rather than RTOS. Many of the most familiar patterns are mechanistic, but in real-time systems higher-level architectural ...


6

In VxWorks 5.x all of the data and text segment are shared across tasks. There is in effect, a single memory space. Vxworks 6.x introduced Real Time Processes, which are similar to Linux processes, where the data and code segment is specific to a single process, but all tasks (threads) within a process share those segments. In VxWorks 6, you can also think ...


6

Message Queues are: UNIDIRECTIONAL Fixed number of entries Each entry has a maximum size All the queue memory (# entries * entry size) allocated at creation Datagram-like behavior: reading an entry removes it from the queue. If you don't read the entire data, the rest is lost. For example: send a 20 byte message, but the receiver reads 10 bytes. The ...


5

taskDelay(0) will not cause a lower priority task to take control of the CPU. Only if a task at the same priority is ready to execute would taskDelay(0) cause a context switch. taskDelay(0) essentially causes a task at priority x to be put at the end of the priority x ready queue. If it is the only task at that priority, it retains the CPU.


5

Checking in the Tornado target tree as a whole is a good idea in my opinion. The biggest advantage is, that service packs and patches are propagated automatically to other team members and _even_more_important_ to the build machine. An other advantage is, that if you need to debug something in an old version, you have the correct header files and libraries. ...


5

VxWorks 6.x provides a function called classShow() which will list all the objects of a specific class (e.g. semaphores, message queues, tasks, ...). The following call will give you a list of objects for a given class: classShow(objClassIdGet(classId), 1) The classId types are: 1 windSemClass, /* Wind native semaphore */ 2 windSemPxClass, ...


5

here is another potential way: -> saveFd = open("myfile.txt",0x102, 0777 ) -> oldFd = ioGlobalStdGet(1) -> ioGlobalStdSet(1, saveFd) -> runmytest() ... -> ioGlobalStdSet(1, oldFd) this will redirect all stdout activity to the file you opened. You might have to play around with the file name of the open to make it write on the host (e.g. use ...


5

As Mike DeSimone commented, way too generic. However, here are couple things to keep in mind for a RTOS (not just VxWorks). Avoid doing too much in the ISR. If possible pass on some of the processing to a waiting task. Keep multithreading optimal. Too much and you have context switching overhead. Too little and your problem solution may be complicated.


5

Remember that a Mutex must first be acquired/taken then released/given. In addition, the task that acquires the mutex owns it. This prevents another task from releasing a mutex it doesn't own. With that being the case, it becomes clear that since an ISR cannot acquire a mutex (or any semaphore for that matter - it's a blocking operation), then it follows ...


5

Yes, it does. Basically compilers store them to data segment. Sometimes if you use a constant char array in you code (like printf("<1024 char array goes here");) it will go to data segment (AFAIK some old compilers /Borland?/ may store it in the text segment). You can force the compiler to put a global variable in a custom section (for VC++ it was #pragma ...


5

GetTickCount is a windows API described thus: Retrieves the number of milliseconds that have elapsed since the system was started, up to 49.7 days Yes, CLOCK_MONOTONIC is the correct POSIX clock to use. Here is untested code for you: double GetTickCount(void) { struct timespec now; if (clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, &now)) return 0; ...


5

Thread is a concept typically used with an OS supporting process models (Unix/Linux/Windows) where you run a process. This process could have a single thread of execution (like a simple C program). Or you could create multiple threads to perform certain operations in parallel within the current process memory space. With older vxWorks, there was no process ...


5

VxWorks provides cacheLib which enables you to perform certain cache operations, flushing as well. You'll have to check the reference manual for your Version of VxWorks. Anyway, from version 5.4: STATUS cacheFlush ( CACHE_TYPE cache, /* cache to flush */ void * address, /* virtual address */ size_t bytes /* number of bytes to flush ...


5

Thats just due to how ARMs op codes are mapped and is actually helps me "eyeball" a dump to see if its ARM code. I would suggest you go through part of the ARM Architecture Manual to see how op codes are generated. particularly conditionals. the E is created when you always want something to happen


5

Does your ISR call the fppSave()/fppRestore() functions? If it doesn't, then the ISR is stomping on FP registers that might be in use by existing tasks. Specifically, FP registers are used by the C++ compiler on the PPC architecture (I think dealing with throw/catch).


4

If rsh connects to the vxWorks Kernel Shell (i.e. the -> prompt) then the advise makes sense. The kernel shell is typically a permanent task that parses whatever the user types and executes the appropriate function. When you type a "command", the shell actually looks up the symbol (i.e. global variable or function) and if it's a function, it will call the ...


4

The manual page says: ERRORS EACCES Permission to create a socket of the specified type and/or protocol is denied. EAFNOSUPPORT The implementation does not support the specified address family. EINVAL Unknown protocol, or protocol family not available. EINVAL Invalid flags in type. EMFILE Process file table overflow. ENFILE The system ...


4

The system clock forms the basis of how VxWorks tracks time and timeouts. Most of the OS objects supporting timeouts (semaphores, message queues, events) as well as the taskDelay call are in units of clock ticks, which is based on the system clock. Generally speaking, the system clock rate is chosen by the board designer for a reason. Cranking up the ...


4

This should be quite easy with native vxworks, a message queue is what is required here. Your wait_for method can be used as is. bool condition::wait_for(mutex& mutex) const { unlocker ul(mutex); // relinquish mutex return wait(event); } // ul's dtor grabs mutex again but the wait(event) code would look like this: ...


4

Not quite sure what you mean by "runtime footprint", but the ti command will show you the stack usage for a particular task: -> ti tNet0 NAME ENTRY TID PRI STATUS PC SP ERRNO DELAY ---------- ------------ -------- --- ---------- -------- -------- ------- ----- tNet0 ipcomNetTask 1040fad0 50 PEND ...


4

You are ignoring the nBytes return value from read(), and instead always writing sizeof buf bytes to the output. That's wrong, for partial reads (where nBytes is less than sizeof buf) you are injecting junk into the written stream. The write should of course use nBytes, too. Also: the write can fail, and write less than you requested, so you need to loop ...



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