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11

With a recent trunk version of PyWavelets, getting approximations of scaling function and wavelet function on x-grid is pretty straightforward: [phi, psi, x] = pywt.Wavelet('db2').wavefun(level=4) Note that x-grid output is not available in v0.1.6, so if you need that you will have to use the trunk version. Having that data, you can plot it using your ...


11

I strongly recommend the "Wavelet Methods in Statistics with R" book from Springer in their UseR! series if you're getting started with wavelets. This uses the wavethresh package.


10

Without more information or clarification of what you mean by good (Good for what ?), it is difficult to make any recommendation. Some C/C++ Wavelet libraries are listed below. Wavelet Geophysical Wavelet Library WvLib wavelet1d WAILI GNU Scientific Library or gsl see here for DWT documentation blitzwave nwave Wavelet Image Compression Library ...


10

Looking at the documentation for DWT2 and IDWT2, it appears that you have 2 general options for reconstructing your multiply-decomposed images: Store all of the horizontal, vertical, and diagonal detail coefficient matrices from each decomposition step and use them in the reconstruction. Enter an empty matrix ([ ]) for any detail coefficient matrices that ...


10

@ will let you access the slots of an S4 object. So if your object is called wave, then wave@W should get you your vector. Note that often the best way to do this is to not access the slot directly but rather through an accessor function (e.g. coefs() rather than digging out the coefficients with $ or @). However, often such functions do not exist so ...


8

On top of what you've got there already, I would recommend signal processing or some similar course that covers Fourier transforms and the like. Besides being useful as a foundation for wavelets, Fourier theory will give you a new way of looking at data that is often useful. Wavelets will probably be part of the curriculum for more advanced signal processing ...


8

While your matrix has huge dimensions it's also very "sparse", which means that most of it's elements are zeros. To improve performance you can make use of MATLAB's sparse matrix support by ensuring that you only operate on the non-zero parts of your matrix. Sparse matrices in MATLAB can be built efficiently by constructing the coordinate form of the sparse ...


6

The sample image used in my answer to that other question was an indexed image, so there are a few changes that need to be made to get that code working for an RGB image. I'll first address your question about the 'db1' argument passed to DWT2. This specifies the type of wavelet to use for the decomposition (in this case, a Daubechies wavelet). More ...


6

I'm not sure how familiar you are with general signal processing, so I'll try to be clear, but not chew the food for you. Wavelets are essentially filter banks. Each filter splits a given signal into two non-overlapping independent high frequency and low frequency subbands such that it can then be reconstructed by the means of an inverse transform. When ...


6

I would strongly recommend the MATLAB Wavelet Toolbox for this application. It is intuitive and easy to use and you can get up and running very quickly on wavelet transforms in general, and the discrete wavelet transform in particular. We have been using it in my group for 1D applications, but much of the toolbox is designed specifically to be used for 2D ...


6

I found a way to convolve the image with different gabor filters and gather the responses of the pixels base on their local characteristics using FFT. This is call contextual filtering, usually when you filter an image you only apply a single kernel to the entire thing, but in contextual filtering the characteristics of the filter change according to the ...


5

The CRAN Task View on time series has this to offer: Wavelet methods : The wavelets package includes computing wavelet filters, wavelet transforms and multiresolution analyses. Wavelet methods for time series analysis based on Percival and Walden (2000) are given in wmtsa. Further wavelet methods can be found in the packages brainwaver, ...


5

In case you have a high-end gpu (nvidia cuda enabled or from other manufactorer) you can use cuvilib.


4

As an alternative to the Mathworks-specific MATLAB Wavelet Toolbox, I would also suggest the Rice Wavelet Toolbox, Ivan Selesnick's Wavelet Software, or WaveLab from David Donoho (and colleagues) at Stanford University I am not too sure about video processing, but all three are good-quality and free.


4

First of all, I would like to point you to the function that already implements Single-level Multi-dimensional Transform (Source). It returns a dictionary of n-dimensional coefficients arrays. Coefficients are addressed by keys that describe type of the transform (approximation/details) applied to each of the dimensions. For example for a 2D case the result ...


4

FFT as an algorithm to estimate a Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT), provides the frequency content of your audio signal (magnitude and phase as you mention). This will give you a set of magnitude/phase values per discrete frequency bin, which you can map to a continuous frequency value (based on the bin index or discrete frequency, the number of FFT points ...


4

You discovered a bug in the wt.R function (errant parentheses). The bug has been fixed in version 0.12 of the biwavelet package, so both versions of your code above should now work. Thanks for spotting the error. Please don't hesitate to email the maintainer of the package (i.e., me) about bugs in the future.


4

1. Q: "What does H (level) mean?" A: Wikipedia describes this concept nicely, but I'll attempt to summarize. For each level, the data (original data for level 1, otherwise approximation data from previous level) is decomposed into approximation and detail data. The result is coefficient which describe the data in different frequency bins. 2. Q: How do I ...


4

Have you tried PyWavelets? import pywt x = [3, 7, 1, 1, -2, 5, 4, 6] # Discrete Wavelet Transform cA, cD = pywt.dwt(x, 'db2') x2 = pywt.idwt(cA, cD, 'db2') There are a few examples in their documentation. The GitHub repository hasn't had any movement in a while, but there is at least one actively developed pull request.


4

The wthresh function will set all values below the threshold to zero. It looks like most of your signal is above 0.4 so it doesn't have much effect. This is what it looks like with a (hard) threshold of 1.3: The wavelet transform is similar to a windowed fourier transform. It breaks an incoming signal into sub-signals which are basically representations ...


3

From a high level view point, you first extract the data of your RGB image (typically splitting the 3 channels). Then, for each channel, you split your image into 4: Low Pass Vertical+Low Pass Horizontal in the top left corner Low Pass Vertical+High Pass Horizontal in the top right corner High Pass Vertical+Low Pass Horizontal in the lower left corner ...


3

One approach to detect outliers is to use the three standard deviation rule. An example: %# some random data resembling yours x = randn(100,1); x(75) = -14; subplot(211), plot(x) %# tone down the noisy points mu = mean(x); sd = std(x); Z = 3; idx = ( abs(x-mu) > Z*sd ); %# outliers x(idx) = Z*sd .* sign(x(idx)); %# cap values at 3*STD(X) ...


3

If it's for demonstrative purposes only, and you're not actually going to be using these scaled values for anything, I sometimes like to increase contrast in the following way: % your data is in variable 'a' plot(a.*abs(a)/max(abs(a))) edit: since we're posting images, here's mine (before/after):


3

You might try a split window filter. If x is your current sample, the filter would look something like: k = [L L L L L L 0 0 0 x 0 0 0 R R R R R R] For each sample x, you average a band of surrounding samples on the left (L) and a band of surrounding samples on the right. If your samples are positive and negative (as yours are) you should take the abs. ...


3

Under reasonable assumptions, the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) decomposes the power/energy/variance of a time series into scales. It is an energy-preserving transform in that the total variance contained in the original time series is contained in the squared wavelet coefficients (properly normalized), just like the DFT! I think the text Wavelet ...


3

I can recommend the book "Ripples in Mathematics: The Discrete Wavelet Transform" by A. Jensen and Anders la Cour-Harbo (ISBN: 3-540-41662-5). In fact, a few years ago, I participated in a course held by one of the authors. The book contains MATLAB source and chapter 13, starting on page 211, is "Wavelets in MATLAB". It also has 2D transform examples (for ...


3

I suspect this is due to the fact that you have only a single frequency here and the function isn't set up for that. I can get a plot by adding white noise to y: require(biwavelet) t <- seq(1/24, 365, 1/24) A <- 2 fs <- 1/24 y <- A + sin(2*pi*fs*t) d <- cbind(t, y + rnorm(length(y))) ## add some white noise to y wt.t1 <- wt(d) plot(wt.t1) ...


3

Numbers in a computer are not as perfect as theoretical numbers. In order to store your data in a finite amount of memory, it's necessary to round it to the nearest representable value. This rounding is very small, but so is the "error" you're seeing. Go look for the article "What every Computer Scientist should know about Floating-Point Arithmetic", or ...


2

It sounds to me like you should just start learning about wavelet transforms and then figure out gaps along the way. They're not that involved. Fourier transforms etc are just an example of an orthogonal basis that is part of linear algebra.



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