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5

The Windows scheduler runs at either 10ms or 16ms intervals by default depending on the processor. If you use the timeBeginPeriod() API you can change this interval (at a fairly significant power consumption cost). In Windows XP and Windows 7, the wave APIs run with a latency of about 30ms, for Windows Vista the wave APIs have a latency of about 50ms. You ...


3

Based on your description, you are doing the playing asynchonously. Are you sure that the backing memory for the wav file is not being cleaned up in that time?


3

In general the waveOut API should be thread-safe. Because usually a waveOutOpen() creates its own thread, and all waveOut* functions send messages to that thread. But I can not give you a proof... However, you can change your application to make it safe in any case: start your thread for buffer management, remember dwBufferThreadId from GUI thread call ...


3

Passing one sample at a time to waveOutWrite is going to be horribly inefficient, both at the level of your code and within the driver. It sets up a DMA transfer of a buffer, and if that buffer is one byte long it incurs all the overhead of switching buffers for every sample. I would send it at least one tenth of a second of samples in each call to ...


3

Converting function pointers to data pointers is an undefined behaviour so you shouldn't do this in the first place. (I understand the win api function is expecting this). Also You cannot pass member functions as callbacks in C/C++ unless you handle the implicit this argument. Your target callback has the following signature void CALLBACK waveOutProc( ...


3

The error means waveOutOpen() rejects your WAVEFORMATEX struct, likely because your nBlockAlign value is wrong. The documentation states: If wFormatTag is WAVE_FORMAT_PCM, nBlockAlign must equal (nChannels × wBitsPerSample) / 8 You are missing the / 8 portion: fmt.nBlockAlign = (fmt.nChannels * fmt.wBitsPerSample) / 8;


3

As far as I know what you are looking for is not possible directly. Windows does not provide you information of the sound output of other programs. Neither as a direct input, nor as access to their voice mixer. The cause of this behavior is that such access would enable bypassing copyright protection. (You could record the wave output of the media player ...


2

dont know if i understood corectly, if you mean how to get peak meter for default playback device you may try this: unit Unit1; interface uses Winapi.Windows, Winapi.Messages, System.SysUtils, System.Variants, System.Classes, Vcl.Graphics, Vcl.Controls, Vcl.Forms, Vcl.Dialogs, Winapi.ActiveX, System.Win.ComObj, MMSystem, Vcl.ComCtrls, Vcl.ExtCtrls; ...


2

The described behavior can happen if you do not call waveOutUnprepareHeader to every buffer you used before you use waveOutClose The flagfield _dwFlags seems to indicate that the buffers are still enqueued (WHDR_INQUEUE | WHDR_PREPARED) try: waveOutReset before unprepare buffers. After analyses your code, I found two problems/bugs which are not ...


2

There is no master volume change in Vista+ through legacy waveOutXxx API. Use WASAPI instead: About WASAPI Endpoint Volume Controls If a device has a hardware volume control, changes made to the control through the IAudioEndpointVolume interface affect the volume level both in shared mode and in exclusive mode. If a device lacks hardware volume ...


2

I don't have the time to Google too much for this, but I know that either Larry Osterman or Raymond Chen blogged about a similar situation. I'll check back later when I have more time to see if this question is still open.


2

WaveOut API and good performance are impossible together. Use something more suitable, ASIO or WASAPI if using Windows, or try Portaudio if you want to be cross-platform.


2

I didn't see any documentation either, but I can't imagine that a call to waveOutWrite would be considered safe to be run concurrently with a call to WaveOutRestart on the same handle. If you're using VS2010 Beta2 I would look at the various walkthroughs for the Agents Library and attempt to turn this into a producer consumer problem where you are passing ...


2

They might not be public in the strictest sense of the word, but using internal members seems like a copout to me. Personally, I'd just make the wrappers internal, and treat your whole set of classes as a single public API. I understand the desire to avoid this - it forces you to create classes, which, for you during your development, violate the ...


2

DirectSound and for .NET the XNA framework comes to my mind. There are many very high quality samples out there how to play sound and animate graphics at the same time with .NET.


2

There are a few things to keep in mind when you need to output audio smoothly: waveOutXxxx API is a legacy/compatibility layer on top of lower level API and as such it has greater overhead and is not recommended when you are to reach minimal latency. Note that this is unlikely to be your primary problem, but this is a piece of general knowledge helpful for ...


1

This looks like a sine wave with it's values inverted. In other words if you adjusted the positives values from 1 to .5 to 0 to -.5, and negatives fom -1 to -.5 to 0 to .5 you'd have a sine wave.


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This is an example on how to enumerate waveIn and waveOut devices on your system: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/matthew_van_eerde/archive/2012/03/13/sample-how-to-enumerate-wavein-and-waveout-devices-on-your-system.aspx So, you can just compare dev id you need and get name of the device.


1

I'm guessing you're writing to the same device. To adjust the volume for each playback 'stream' scale the audio samples before writing them to the device. Also keep in mind that is unnecessary to use two device handles to effectively mix your playback streams. It's trivial to do that in your code.


1

I am really surprised that several OCX instances share the same thread. I could have sworn that they get unique ones. Hence my previous [deleted] answer. May I ask: why are you playing several sounds at once? Is that absolutely necessary? Or, if the other OCX instances are playing "mute" sound, you could identify them by looking into the waveform buffer. Or ...


1

To add to great answers above. Your question is about the latency Windows neither promised not cared of. And as such, it might be quite different depending on OS version, hardware and other factors. WaveOut API, and DirectSound too (not sure about WASAPI, but I guess it is also true for this latest Vista+ audio API) are all set for buffered audio output. ...


1

At the very basic level, Windows is a multi threaded OS. And it schedules threads with 100ms time slices. Which means that, if there is no CPU contention, the delay between the end of the buffer and the waveOutWrite callback could be arbitrailly short. Or, if there are other busy threads, you have to wait up to 100ms per thread. In the best case however... ...


1

It may be thread safe, but if you (or I) can't find any official documentation stating it is thread safe then assume it isn't and add your own thread synchronization. A light weight EnterCriticalSection / LeaveCriticalSection implementation is probably no more than a dozen lines of code. No amount of testing can ever assure you that the API is thread safe: ...


1

Sadly, it's not safe even in a single threaded environment. Look at this question for a discussion: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/195696/why-would-waveoutwrite-cause-an-exception-in-the-debug-heap Attempts to report this to Microsoft resulted in them closing the bug. They're not going to fix it.


1

You can't get this information from the wave API. You'll have to get it from whoever opened the wave device. You can get the playback rate using waveOutGetPlaybackRate(), and knowing that, you could (in theory) know cell size by timing how long it takes to play a buffer of known size. (0 is always silence) But 8 bit stereo will end up taking the same ...


1

//#include <iostream> //#include <initguid.h> //#include <Mmdeviceapi.h> int main() { HRESULT hr; IMMDevice * pDevice = NULL; IMMDeviceEnumerator * pEnumerator = NULL; IPropertyStore* store = nullptr; PWAVEFORMATEX deviceFormatProperties; PROPVARIANT prop; CoInitialize(NULL); // get the device ...



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