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8

Your problem is this: your service config defines a webHttpBinding endpoints - that's a REST ("Xml-over-HTTP") endpoint.... Yet, your client uses a basicHttpBinding and this is a SOAP binding - those are not compatible! You need to change this to make sure the service endpoint(s) offered by the service side are such that the client can connect to it. So: ...


6

In answer to the first question, you can put the service reference in its own project and reference that project in all the other projects that need to access that service. Basically all the service reference is is a lump of .NET code - namespace, class, etc. Better yet (!) for a WCF service you also get an interface thrown in for free (more or less the ...


6

In case that your service call backs the client directly from DCCInitialize and both operation and callback operation are not marked as one-way your application will deadlock. Try marking your callback implementation with this attribute: [CallbackBehavior(ConcurrencyMode=ConcurrencyModel.Reentrant)] Instead of this you can also try to mark operations in ...


4

You can use a WCF Service without exposing metadata. Metadata is used to generate a proxy by Visual Studio or any other tool. So, in case you don't expose metadata, you are going to have to create/write these proxy classes yourself. As long as you use correct service address and right data contracts, you are good to go. Accessing WCF service without ...


4

I managed to fix the problem. One of my project was set to x86 and others were set to Any CPU. Changing all to Any CPU fixed the problem for me. Thanks


4

First question - the service is just like any other code. For example, database access code. Should you put that in every project that needs to access your database? No - you should put it in a project which those other projects can reference. As for your second question, you're specifying a namespace but I expect you think you're specifying a service ...


3

When debugging WCF services it really helps to enable tracing. This lets you diagnose vague messages ("500 Internal Server Error" doesn't really give much away) without too much kerfuffle. Go here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms732023.aspx to see the detail. In brief, add <system.diagnostics> <trace autoflush="true" /> ...


3

No. WCF is a message-based system, so all that connects your client and your service are the XML-serialized messages (and their format) on the wire. When you create a proxy, all the WCF runtime can do is re-create your data structures so that when you XML serialize one of your client-side classes, the representation on the wire will be the same as with the ...


3

That's precisely the way I have done it - hosting a WCF service in a Windows service. The Windows service is the process; the WCF service is where the work is done. In my case, my WCF-based CollectionService is on standby most of the time. I use WCF to start and stop the collector because the WCF programming model makes this easy. However, to get the ...


3

As @Shiraz suggested you can go for https transport with basicHttpBinding. You have a variety of message level securities supported. Well it is true that basicHttpBinding doesn't support all the message level security. But it does some. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms730294.aspx summarizes all the possible choices for basicHttpBinding. From the ...


3

Specified" fields are only generated on optional parameters that are structs. (int, datetime, decimal etc). All such variables will have additional variable generated with the name Specified. Since the "Specified" fields are only generated on optional parameters, if you placed the parameters for the PublishEnrollmentProfile method inside of a DataContract ...


2

You can do certain things with the "raw" Message data type - but it's really not pretty programming... Read about it here: How to pass arbitrary data in a Message object using WCF WCF : Untyped messages on WCF operations.


2

You need a routing service - one that exposes a HTTP endpoint to the world, and uses netTcp internally. Basically, your outward facing http service must become a client in turn to call the internal netTcp service. You can definitely do this in .NET 3.5 with a bit of effort: Service Station: Building a WCF Router, Part 1 Service Station: Building a WCF ...


2

WCF uses SOAP by default - all binding except the webHttpBinding use SOAP. If you want to do REST, you need to use the webHttpBinding. 1) Isn't wsHttpBinging (which is beefed up basicHttpBinding) used in SOAP instead of REST and REST only uses webHttpBinding? Yes - wsHttpBinding is a SOAP-based protocol - webHttpBinding is REST 2) Also, DOES ...


2

I'm going to assume you mean Message Reliability as described in "Programming WCF Services" by Juval Lowy - the author of your linked article (and consequently that quote appears, word for word, in the book too). Reliability is only valid on certain bindings. Take this TCP binding example. In your configuration file: <binding> ...


2

Is the config file for your service (not the client) using endpoints with fully qualified addresses (like your client config)? If so, the reason you're seeing all those localhost references is because when you add the service reference, it's going to carry through that address in the generated files. Update the endpoint in your service config file to ...


2

You can create your own IErrorHandler implementation: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.servicemodel.dispatcher.ierrorhandler.aspx Override ProvideFault and then do conversion from regular exceptions (including plain FaultException) to your own custom based FaultException<T>, where T is your own type that you can define to include custom ...


1

From what I understand, you are correct in that the .Close() can be omitted. As long as there are incomplete asynchronous tasks, the client will not be disposed, not by calling .Close() and not by the client object going out of scope. A using statement for WCF services appears to be ill-advised, as the (great) link from John in the comments below indicates.


1

You need to invoke Close method. Or use following code snippet which despose client object on exit out of using block using(ServiceClient client = new ServiceClient()) { return number.GetNumber(); }


1

You may need also to bind ssl certificate to the specific port number using netsh or HttpConfig tool depending from OS version. Detailed instructions can be found here In your case it could be: netsh http add sslcert ipport=0.0.0.0:18732 certhash=<certhash> appid={<guid>} clientcertnegotiation=enable where certhash = your certificate ...


1

You can use basichttpbinding with https. Have a look at the answer in this thread: http://forums.silverlight.net/forums/t/13275.aspx


1

data annotations like RequiredAttribute and DisplayAttribute etc do not propagated to the generated client side files when using Silverlight 4 and WCF. This is one solution for the problem... Create a class library with a model (Model.dll) sample public partial class Person: INotifyPropertyChanged { private Guid IDField; private string ...


1

Found the answer: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms195389.aspx MessageHeaders.GetHeader(Of T) Method (Int32) For example, within a IClientMessageInspector using the reply object, you get it like so: MyObject myObj = reply.Headers.GetHeader<MyObject>(index);


1

Generated classes actually have the modifier 'partial', so it is possible to extend them. For example, this DataContract: [DataContract] public class TestObject { [DataMember] public int Id { get; set; } [DataMember] public string Title { get; set; } } Can be extended on the client's side in this way: namespace ...


1

The problem is that silverlight always shows not found error in many cases, the first thing that can be is that service really not available, second try to make sure that you service function is not throwing exception Try opening the wcf service in the browser, also this can help to investigate problem And here is how you can configure to send real exception ...


1

You're using WCF 4.0 which uses simplified configuration concepts and will add default endpoints, if no endpoints are defined in configuration or added through code. about the actual issue, I see that there's difference in Contract name in exception 'UserServiceReferences.IUserManagement' and defined in Endpoint "UserServiceReference.IUserManagement". ...


1

No if you use same proxy. Proxy by architecture can create channel only once. In Net.Tcp the channel is bound to connection. So if you want to open new connection for each call simply create new proxy each time you call the service. This will affect your performance because establishing net.tcp connection is expensive. The better way is to redesign your ...


1

Ok, so in the end I solved it by using the following static class and relying on ASP.NET to cache the context for me. I'm not sure if this is the best way to do things, but this allows me to use one ObjectContext per request so I'm not spinning up too many and this also means I don't have to use a lock on the object which would become a nightmare if many ...


1

You have one instance per call, you also have 1 call per instance. So it should be very simple, use a using () { } block in the toplevel of your OperationContract method.



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