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14

Ok, I have finally solved this and my driver is working. Implementation of a KMDF filter driver: Thanks to Sergius who suggested the COM-port approach because this helped me set up WinDbg. This awesome blog post explains how to get it set up quickly, basically you let VPC set up a com port as a named pipe, enable kernel debug mode on the virtualized OS, ...


8

Kernel drivers are programs written against Windows NT's native API (rather than the Win32 Subsystem's API) and which execute in kernel mode on the underlying hardware. This means that a driver needs to be able to deal with switching virtual memory contexts between processes, and needs to be written to be incredibly stable -- because kernel drivers run in ...


7

These are automatic variables: $@ The file name of the target of the rule. If the target is an archive member, then ‘$@’ is the name of the archive file. In a pattern rule that has multiple targets (see Introduction to Pattern Rules), ‘$@’ is the name of whichever target caused the rule's recipe to be run. $< The name of the first ...


6

I found a solution, don't know why this is working, but it is!: In Visual Studio go to: Tools->Options->Projects->VC++ Directories and then Show directories for: include files. Add this folders: C:\WinDDK\7600.16385.1\inc\ddk and C:\WinDDK\7600.16385.1\inc\api Now here is the trick that solved the problem for me and I don't know why, because seems odd ...


6

The likely fix would be to set /Zc:wchar_t- to turn off wchar_t as an intrinsic type. STL6 doesn't have great support for /Zc:wchar_t which is the default since at least VC7.1, perhaps earlier. Meta: Please don't use the STL60 version of STL. This version from 1998 lacks a large number of bug fixes, performance improvements and standards-conformance work ...


5

More recommended way is using UNREFERENCED_PARAMETER() macro, so your function can be changed to: NTSTATUS DriverEntry(PDRIVER_OBJECT DriverObject, PUNICODE_STRING RegistryPath) { UNREFERENCED_PARAMETER(DriverObject); UNREFERENCED_PARAMETER(RegistryPath); DbgPrint("Hello, World"); return STATUS_SUCCESS; }


4

The MSDN docs for this API indicate that When the ProcessInformationClass parameter is ProcessImageFileName, the buffer pointed to by the ProcessInformation parameter should be large enough to hold a UNICODE_STRING structure as well as the string itself. The string stored in the Buffer member is the name of the image file.file. With ...


4

On the USB level, there is no way to differentiate between a conventional Disk on Key and a USB-Floppy. Which means windows itself, cannot tell reliably what is what. There are a few hints that you can gather: Floppies should: a. Have mass-storage protocol CBI/CB b. SCSI UFI BUT, in the world of USB devices, everyone does whatever they want. The only test ...


4

Have a go with this. I have tried to hack your original code about as little as possible; the following codes (for me at least) get through to the inner while(SetupDiEnumDeviceInterfaces..): void DeviceManager::GetDeviceUSB(std::string vid, std::string pid) { DWORD deviceIndex = 0; deviceInfoData.cbSize = sizeof(deviceInfoData); //buried ...


4

You have error in string constant: TEXT("\\?\\c:\\Documents ...." should be TEXT("\\\\?\\c:\\Documents ...." Read carefully, escape carefully : http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/hardware/ff552316%28v=vs.85%29.aspx UPDATE: From http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa365247.aspx : Win32 File Namespaces The Win32 namespace prefixing ...


4

The WDK has "Treat warning as error" activated, and unused parameters trigger a warning. So if you change your code to : NTSTATUS DriverEntry(PDRIVER_OBJECT /*DriverObject*/, PUNICODE_STRING /*RegistryPath*/) { DbgPrint("Hello, World"); return STATUS_SUCCESS; } it should compile.


4

IRPs are Windows kernel structures. They are used to represent an I/O request as it moves around the kernel system. A filesystem, for example, that needs to read from a block device generates an IRP that represents its read request and hands it to the block device. The block device processes the IRP, puts the results in the IRP, marks it complete, and tells ...


3

The build option looks correct. You wouldn't need to make changes to the code unless the code makes assumptions about things like the size of pointers, integers etc. Scripts that "install" drivers by mucking with the registry etc. may not work. Drivers in Win7 64 bit need to be either WHQL test signed by Microsoft, test signed by yourself, or signed with ...


3

First of all: You can do what you want to do (disable the touchpad on my laptop when a mouse is plugged in) in the user-mode. It will be much simpler and safer. Look at Using Device Installation Functions and WM_DEVICECHANGE To debug problems in your code: Get a memory dump from BSOD or setup a kernel debugger connection (using a COM-port on your virtual PC ...


3

they should be defined in WinNT.h (they are in the SDK; don't have the DDK at hand) ULONG is unsigned long; on a 32-bit system, this is the size of a pointer. So a pointer can be converted back and forth to ULONG without loss - but not so on a 64-bit system (where casting the value will truncate it). People cast to ULONG to get byte-base pointer arithmetic ...


3

The reason this code fails on 64-bit is that it is casting pointers to ULONG. ULONG is a 32-bit value while pointers on 64-bit are 64-bit values. So you will be truncating the pointer whenever you use the ULONG cast. The PCHAR cast, assuming PCHAR is defined as char * is fine, provided the intention is to increment the pointer by an explicit number of ...


3

If you translate -536870347 to hex you get 0xe0000235 - a quick search finds that this is defined in setupapi.h as ERROR_IN_WOW64 and the explanation is: If the function returns ERROR_IN_WOW64 in a 32-bit application, the application is executing on a 64-bit system, which is not allowed.


3

See DDKBUILD for an example of how to launch the WDK build procedure from a bath file: http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?article=43 Typically all you need to do is modify this procedure to fit your IDE. -scott


3

As long as you have at least one other artifact you can write a script to copy it and all other artifacts to a predefined place in your working copy (say, a directory keyed by BUILD_ID, e.g. foo_${BUILD_ID}_bar; you create it dynamically in the script, of course). Then as a post-build step in Jenkins designate everything (${BUILD_ID}/**/*) in that directory ...


3

Well, if by tables you mean objects, you can query the data dictionary: select distinct type_name from dmi_dd_attr_info where attr_name = 'subject' This will give you the names of all the types which have the attribute "subject"; distinct is needed because you have one entry for each {type, attribute, locale}, so you'll get many lines for the same ...


3

This is user-mode code. Use OutputDebugString instead and don't include ntddk.h at all. If you need to, write a little function as adapter to OutputDebugString as it does not take a formatting string etc. like its counterpart DbgPrint. If you absolutely must use DbgPrint, it is also available from ntdll.dll, of course. So you could reach into that and ...


3

You should use the SetupUninstallOEMInf function to uninstall the .INF (and subsequently .PNF) files. This will take care of the details. pnputil (on Vista and higher) should do the equivalent thing from the command line. However, this function will not delete drivers that are currently installed (e.g. associated with a devnode). Why are you uninstalling ...


3

This is the answer I received from Microsoft support. Open msnmntr.sln in Visual Studio. In Solution Explorer, right-click Solution msnmntr (2 projects), and choose Add > New Project. Navigate to Windows Driver > Package. Add a new Driver Install Package named msnmntr Package. In Solution Explorer, right-click Solution msnmntr (2 projects), and ...


3

The problem starts with how SetupDiGetClassDevs is called. If you are looking to get a device path, use SetupDiGetClassDevs(&GUID_DEVINTERFACE_USB_DEVICE ,,,) SetupDiEnumDeviceInterfaces fails with error 259 if SetupDiGetClassDevs is given the wrong GUID in ClassGuid which MS Help says is A pointer to the GUID for a device setup class or a device ...


3

In vista and above DbgPrint messages get masked by default. Try this in your WinDbg prompt ed Kd_DEFAULT_Mask 8 Refer to this question Kernel trace Windows 7 WinDbg or this article DbgPrint in vista and later for more details.


3

By the time you hit that stage the driver is already loaded and DriverEntry has already been called. To step through DriverEntry you need to set a breakpoint with bu: bu kmdfsmall!driverentry And then disable/enable the device on the target. This will cause the driver to be reloaded and your breakpoint hit. FYI your topic is misleading. The INF is the ...


2

The try/except handling in the WDK follows the SEH model used throughout windows. Notice that you can continue after catching an exception. This model predated C++, so the C++ standard is not the same as the exception model used by Win32. PS: C does not have exception handling, so SEH is a non-standard extension to C. SEH exception handling in the MSDN ...


2

Your SOURCES should include a .rc file that should contain a VERSIONINFO resource. If it already doesn't, please add it. The INX file also contains a [Version] section that will end up in the generated .inf file. Update it to match your VERSIONINFO as needed.


2

Yes, jump targets get re-written during relocation when a module is not loaded at it's preferred base address in memory. Actually, developers are advised to provide a non-default base address for their modules to avoid relocation cost, but many never do, so some modules will always get relocated and the loader has to re-write jump targets.



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