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11

One reason certainly is performance. GC handles (which power all of the "exotic" references such as WeakReference) come with a performance cost. Weak events are slower than "strong" events since they require a GC handle. A strong event is implemented (by default) by an instance field storing a delegate. This is just an ordinary managed reference as cheap as ...


4

You can verify for yourself with a simple test program. But I find the documentation for the WeakReference type itself to be somewhat more clear than the page you were looking at. In particular, the flag referred to as "short" and "long" in your linked page is called trackResurrection in the actual constructor documentation. And the description for the ...


4

Run this code through the static analyzer (shift+command+B or choose "Analyze" from the "Product" menu) and it will point out that createCGImage is creating a CGImageRef that you're never releasing. You might want to do something like: CGImageRef imageRef = [context createCGImage:inputImage fromRect:inputImage.extent]; img = [UIImage ...


3

No, you shouldn't check imageViewReference for null, you should check for null only what it covers - ImageView using the return value of get method.


3

You can't explicitly free memory in Python. The garbage collector is responsible to do that for you. What you can do is guarantee that all the references to your objects are cleaned. The garbage collector works with epochs (like e1, e2 and e3) and only the objects in e3 will be cleaned in the next iteration. Objects only go from epoch eX to eY (where Y > ...


3

No, it's not. See the description below. View controller keeps strong reference to his view. View controller's view (not view controller) keeps strong reference to faceView. FaceView keeps strong reference to View controller.


3

I thought to write a little demo program that demonstrates the difference. Turned out to be a bit more challenging than I counted on. First necessary ingredient is to ensure that the finalizer thread can be slowed down so you can observe the value of WeakReference.IsAlive without risking it being affected by a race with the finalizer thread. So I used: ...


2

Your code is correct. Compile as Release and run without the debugger (Shift+F5) or directly from command prompt. For an explanation see Does garbage collection run during debug?


1

No, weakA itself cannot be null as long as you still hold a reference to it. It's just the object that may be collected. Can you post an example of the code you mentioned?


1

You can probably make this work, but you want your weak observables to have weak references to the real Observables, not to be weak references. Moreover, it's not enough to allow the real observers to be GC'd; you also need to unregister the wrapper objects from the Observable once that happens. This sort of thing is what reference queues are for, but if ...


1

(To build off of my comment) Rather than holding onto a reference, you can rely on the get method of WeakReference. The class could also be parametized so the cast is not necessary in the update method: private class ObserverWeak extends WeakReference<Observer> implements Observer{ public ObserverWeak(Observer referent) { super(referent); ...


1

Your real problem, to me, sounds like you have a graph where PORTs are nodes and LINKs are edges. And your requirement is that when you delete an edge, the two nodes that the edge connects should also be deleted. This can be done explicitly by overriding the __del__ method of the node so that deleting it deletes the edges which is connects to. Python ...


1

See the weakref module. It maintains a reference to an object without preventing it from being garbage collected if all its strong references are removed. Example: import weakref class LINK(object): pass class PORT(object): def __init__(self, link=None): if link is not None: self.link = weakref.ref(link) else: ...


1

You can't explicitly free memory. What you need to do is to make sure you don't keep references to objects. They will then be garbage collected, freeing the memory. BTW, you can call gc.collect() to force a gc operation. UPDATE: You CAN NOT delete all the references to one object through only deleting one of its references, since you don't know who else is ...


1

I know this is an old question but I was looking for an answer recently and came up with something. Like others said, there is no documented way to do it and looking at the implementation of weakproxy type confirms that there is no standard way to achieve this. My solution uses the fact that all Python objects have a set of standard methods (like __repr__) ...


1

In my opinion it's a good idea in most cases. The code that is responsible for releasing the listener is at the same place where it gets registered. In practice i see a lot of software which is keeping listeners forever. Often programmers are not even aware that they should unregister them. It usually is possible to return a custom object with a reference ...


1

John you are correct there is no need to do it.


1

Rob is right on the money. And images can be big, so that's why you have a big leak. The rule of thumb with Core Foundation objects is the "create rule." Search in Xcode on "Create Rule" and read the article. The gist of it is this: Core Foundation functions have names that indicate when you own a returned object: Object-creation functions that ...


1

The purpose of weakSelf is to ensure that the notification center observer doesn't maintain a strong reference to AVCamViewController. The presence of strongSelf inside the block is to avoid race conditions where AVCamViewController might be deallocated in the middle of a notification (thus if weakSelf existed when the notification came in, keep it around ...


1

If we pass self it could lead to a retain cycle under certain conditions (For example some object may have strong reference to the block and self might have strong reference to that object). Passing weak reference into the block guarantees absence of such a retain cycle. But we still may need to keep self alive while block is executed. That's why we assign ...


1

Memory leak or problems can occur if you use strong references inside blocks for example. It is better to search on SO before post questions. You should also read here a very nice explain: Differences between strong and weak in objective-c If you want to access self method, for example, inside a block, you can define as: __block id WeakSelf = self; ...



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