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You will have to use an asynchronous approach for this. An example is to use a "dispatcher" function which invokes the work for each count and keep tracks of current count. It will make sure the next call is called asynchronous. When done the given callback is invoked. Example function startLoop(lFrom, lTo, workFunc, callback) { var i = lFrom - 1; ...


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In short you cannot pass a DOM element to a worker. Only data, typically as strings, can be passed to webworkers not objects. You should extract your data from your table, wrap it up in an object, turn your object into json, send the json to the worker, process it and return some json back to the main thread.


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!window and !!window are both boolean values in JavaScript. The ! operator will first convert the expression to is boolean form (see this gist about Implicit Boolean Conversions in JavaScript). !window is the inverse of that, it evaluates to true if and only if the window variable is either undefined or is defined to a 'falsy' value. !!window is a ...


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You don't gain performance by splitting up synchronous steps and running them synchronized via channels - no matter how many threads, workers or machines you are running the steps on. Instead, you loose performance due to the necessary coordination overhead. It doesn't matter how expensive the individual steps are. There is no point in granularity at which ...


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At this point I like to share my parser: https://github.com/tobiasnickel/tXml with its tXml() method you can parse a string into an object and it takes only 0.5kb minified + gzipped


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Javascript intervals does not guarantee that the function is called at the exact time, just that it is called "sometime after" the amount of time specified. This link explains a bit about window.performance timing which you might be able to use, depending on what browsers you need to support. You can look at the answers in this question for some code ...


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I would like to think that the worker threads can sleep whenever the CPU wants to, and the duration measured with performance.now() would be incorrect. Is that a kind of correct assumption? Partially. Yes, the OS can let threads sleep whenever it wants. This is done when there is more important work to do, or if it decides to throttle the cpu to save ...


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It sounds like you're asking that if the worker isn't actually doing something, then does time measured by performance.now() increase? From https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Performance/now the values returned by Performance.now() always increase at a constant rate, independent of the system clock (which might be adjusted manually or ...


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Approach 1: Manually calculating average per tile Here is one approach you can try: There is only need for reading, update can be done later using HW acceleration Use async calls for every row (or tile if the image is very wide) This gives an accurate result but is slower and depends on CORS restrictions. Example You can see the original image for a ...


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Web Workers won't be too helpful here (for taking on anything UI related). https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Web_Workers_API/Using_web_workers The global scope for Web Workers is separate from the window, so you have no access to the DOM from within the worker. You might want to consider creating a variable toggle for Loading State and only ...


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Here when you make your function call, you go through, create all your workers, and then return false at the end. No matter what your function will always return false. You seem to be misunderstanding the Async workflow of Javacript. var handler = function(e){ if(e.data.result){ result = true; } } That function above ...



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