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4

The code works as expected. Since Javascript is single threaded, the UI will block while your loop is executing. Promises are just a nice way to handle async code. See an introduction here: http://www.html5rocks.com/en/tutorials/es6/promises/ https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Promise To be able to ...


4

If you need to do some processing on the data (that you will receive from ajax call) then only you should use a web worker . For example if you have to calculate the average price of stocks over a week and then display it as a bar chart and you have data of complete year then you can use a web worker for this . Otherwise there is no point of using a web ...


3

After googling and watching some videos on udacity, I found that the intended behavior of the worker is to stay until the page it controls is closed and reopened again when the new service worker can take control. The solution was to force it to take control based on https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/ServiceWorkerGlobalScope/skipWaiting the ...


3

Are Promises only a way to handle code that is already 'made to be' async? Yes. Promises don't truly create asynchronous operations. Their intention is just to make working with asynchronous operations easier, by defining a consistent API. But, they don't avoid blocking on their own beyond one small delay between when resolve() and .then() callbacks are ...


3

This behaviour will vary between browsers. Most of them will reduce JavaScript priority to preserve CPU cycles and performance overhead if the tab is not used. I believe some browsers suspend the tab execution entirely so yes it will be a pause until back in focus. I think Firefox has an option to control this.


2

Your worker sends the reply before you even set the on message callback. So when you do worker.onmessage = ... the "Hello to you too" message is already gone. Always assign callbacks first, this also applies to onload callbacks on XHR requests and images. Do it like this: var worker = new Worker("worker.js"); worker.onmessage = function(event){ ...


2

Promises are not threads. They're just a sugar for handling success and failure events (callbacks) in single-threaded code. Callback to new Promise(cb) constructor is executed immediately and synchronously. Callbacks given to .then(cb)/.catch(cb) are executed on next tick after the promise is resolved/rejected, but they also run on the same—and only—thread. ...


2

There's nothing mentioned in the processing model section of the web worker spec, in particular the "Kill a Worker" and "Terminate a Worker" sections. I don't think you have much choice but to have code on the UI thread send a message to the worker to tell it to clean up.


2

It looks like you can do self.onclose = function() { ... }; which will be called when the worker is closed. More can be read here. Since workers have their own context, you have to access the scope via the WorkerGlobalScope. The exposed WorkerGlobalScope.self should allow you to access events such as onclose(). The caveat here appears to be that the API ...


2

I believe the answer is no, at least for now. There's a related bug on Bugzilla: The SharedArrayBuffer spec says that DataView is allowed on SharedArrayBuffer, and that SharedArrayBuffer.isView() on a DataView should return true. Neither is the case in Firefox at the moment.


1

When worker.onmessage is triggered it is going to be outside the Angular digest cycle. So even though you have updated the model, Angular does not know that it needs to update the views. In order for you to notify Angular that a new digest cycle has to happen you need to call $scope.$apply() worker.onmessage = function(e) { $scope.$apply(function(){ ...


1

Update: This is actually working in Chrome so Firefox-only issue at the moment. Mozilla's Ben Kelly pointed me to https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1206947 so check there for status.


1

Angular Web Worker with polling example When you are dealing with the workers in AngularJS its often required that your worker script to be inline(incase you are using some build tools like gulp/grunt) and we can achieve this using the following approach. Example below also shows how polling can be done to server using workers: First lets create our ...


1

I agree with the current accepted answer but often editing and managing the worker code will be hectic as its in the form of a string. So optionally we can use the below approach where we can keep the worker as a function, and then covert to string->blob: // function to be your worker function workerFunction() { var self = this; self.onmessage = ...


1

Instead of parsing the data in the main thread you can also pass the filename as a message to the worker and have the worker load it from disk. Otherwise you will have all the data in memory twice, once in the host and once in the worker. A different option would be to use the csv npm package with the streaming parser. postMessage the lines as they come in ...


1

Is there a way to require Q in so that it works with both node's require() and web-worker's importScripts()? You need to import just the type of Q and then load the q lazily if needed. So: import _Q = require('q'); if(importScripts != undefined && WorkerGlobalScope == undefined && typeof module !== 'undefined' && ...



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