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93

You are welcome to ask the same question on the google group. You will find more than 500 users there and some of them are development companies building projects for their clients. My impression is that most of them use postgresql (that's what I do to) and some others use the Google App Engine. In fact web2py is the only framework that allows you to write ...


77

(disclaimer: I am the project leader for web2py) Django has been around 5 years longer than web2py therefore it has more users and more applications to show off. Django has what they call "admin" which is not the same as web2py's "admin" but more like web2py's "appadmin". Django's "admin" is better and more customizable than web2py's "appadmin". Django does ...


26

web2py was very much inspired by Django and if you know one it is easy to learn the other. We added some features we did not find in Django, including: database migrations (alter tables automatically), tickets on errors, a web based IDE, a database abstraction layer that works on Google App Engine, a role based access control mechanism with pluggable login ...


25

Just to add a bit to user570039's answer, local_import is documented here. It includes a reload parameter. According to the documentation: When you specifyreload=True, it will re-import the module upon each request; otherwise your python process will only import the module once. The default isreload=False. In development, setting reload=True can be ...


25

I think you'll find web2py to be one of the easiest to set up, learn, and use (those are among its primary goals). It requires no installation or configuration, has no dependencies, and includes everything you need (Python interpreter, web server, relational database, web-based IDE, error ticketing, database abstraction layer, database administration, ...


22

web2py does have a smaller market share than competitor products but it is also much younger. I have knowledge of at least 13 consulting companies that provide web2py support. Anyway, I do believe web2py is much easier to use than other systems and therefore you will need less support that you may think. Most of the current users get their support via the ...


21

Both Django and web2py are excellent 'full stack' web frameworks with similar features and capabilities - you won't be 'missing out' on much as a beginner with either framework. It's hard to answer your question without knowing more about what you want to do with your learning. Some would say that there is a danger of learning the framework and not the ...


20

func has to be in a place that is in PYTHONPATH (sys.path) such as web2py/site-packages. This is the proper Pythonic way of doing it. If instead you want to package your module with your app, then place it in applications/yourapp/modules, next, you should import it with func = local_import('func') Q: People who are new to web2py may wonder: why use ...


17

Learning is bad. Sherlock Holmes explains: "You see," he explained, "I consider that a man's brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose. A fool takes in all the lumber of every sort that he comes across, so that the knowledge which might be useful to him gets crowded out, or at ...


17

web2py may be young, but the mailing list has ~2000 messages / month, which is similar to Django and far more than Turbogears. I usually get answers to my questions within a few hours. There is also an excellent online book, but I find the best source of information is the mailing list. I have used both RoR, Django, Turbogears, and web2py, and find web2py ...


17

For a beginner I'd suggest Django because it's popular, has great documentation and a strong community which can help you a lot when starting. Use Stack Overflow and their IRC channel. Don't be afraid to ask stuff. Use their tutorial - It's really good. Also, I think that the main advantage of Django over Flask when it comes to beginners at least is that it ...


16

You should look at the web2py online documentation (http://web2py.com/book). It comes with a Role Based Access Control (the most general access control mechanism) and it is very granular, you can grant access for specific operation on specific records. It comes with a web based IDE but you can use WingIDE, Eclipse and PyCharm too. It comes with helper ...


16

from realworld import common_patterns learning = True mistakes = [] fixed_mistakes = [] new_ideas = range(999) while learning: try: it_works, new_mistakes = code_project(new_ideas, fixed_mistakes) except BossBreathingDownNeck: new_ideas = [] it_works, new_mistakes = use_existing_frameworks(common_patterns, fixed_mistakes) ...


15

[update - 29/05] We now have a big button on the web tab that will do all this stuff for you. Just click where it says Web2Py, fill in your admin password, and you're good to go. Here's the old stuff for historical interest... I'm a PythonAnywhere developer. We're not massive web2py experts (yet?) but I've managed to get web2py up and running like this: ...


13

I'm using web2py for a small web app. It's running the HITs on a Mechanical Turk project, and giving me an interface to control and visualize them. I started on Google App Engine, but then got sick of the little annoyances of not having direct database access and having to wait forever each time I want to upload my code, and moved to a local server with ...


13

OS: Windows 7/Windows XP IDE: NetBeans Version control: TortoiseHg/NetBeans Debugger: winpdb Shell: IPython Publish: WinSCP/PuTTY/TortoiseHg Scripts Once I create a new project in web2py I add a few scripts to my main app folder: web2py\applications\myapp\DebugWinpdb.bat: C:\Python25\Scripts\winpdb.bat ..\..\web2py.py -i 127.0.0.1 -p8000 -mypassword ...


12

Learning is good. Learning something (that eventually goes away) is no loss at all. The basic skills of web development (HTML, CSS, URL-parsing, GET vs. POST) don't ever change. Frameworks come and go. Learn as many as you can. Learn how to manage your learning so that you (a) get to the important stuff first and (b) leave the other framework stuff ...


12

OK, looking closer into the web2py email list that I linked above, I figured out that the copmlete solution is already there. I could follow the instructions and, thanks pbreit's brilliant post, now my deployment works like a charm (using only 38MB RAM in idle state) with nginx+uwsgi. Here are the parts that I used (I just stripped down the fabfile.py to ...


11

I started using web2py about 6 month ago. I choose it, because I wanted to move from PHP to Python, to have a more object-oriented approch because of the language featrues of python. The all-in-one approach of web2py is really amazing and makes the start very fast. As a former symfony user I soon started to miss Components and Forms that aren't dependend ...


11

c'mon guys... your only argument is "Technical differences are rather irrelevant." and "it don't matter what web framework you use"? I disagree. The size of the users base has more to do with marketing and how long a framework has been around. By that argument ASP and PHP are better than Rails. Has anybody here used both Rails and web2py? web2py runs ...


11

Try the new web2py admin interface in trunk. It has a web based mercurial interface and a google deploy interface. In web2py you can edit applications/admin/models/0.py and set TEXT_EDITOR = 'amy' And you will get the web based Amy editor with autocompletion. It is not default because because it does not work with some browsers and because ...


11

Does web2py provide Javascript form validation? Out of the box web2py does server-side validation, client side js pre-validation of int, double and calendar popup for date/time/datetime. There are jQuery plugins to add more client-side validation. web2py is mostly serverside, not clientside. Does web2py have a mongo db plugin? Something comparable ...


11

auth.settings.table_user_name stores the name of the user table (which defaults to auth_user), and auth.settings.table_user is a reference to the user table itself. Those two settings are used elsewhere in the Auth code, so that's why it is important to update them when you create a custom user table (in your case, you don't need to update ...


10

As Massimo points out above, the team at tenthrow uses web2py for tenthrow.com We did most of our development work during 2009. Our stack uses cherokee, web2py, postgresql, and amazon s3. We had done many python web implementations prior to this on a variety of frameworks and backends. To say that we simply could not have done tenthrow so quickly and easily ...


10

First, even in your second example, you should do: <a href="{{=URL('vote', args=['up', item.id])}}"> <img src="{{=URL('static', 'up.png')}}"/></a> Always use the URL() helper to write URLs, even in the views. It handles outgoing rewrites, and it knows the current app (and controller), so you don't have to include those (which means if ...


9

I am evaluating web frameworks for a long time now. I wrote my own (not open) frameworks in Perl and in PHP. Well, PHP has a builtin deadend and the whole infrastructure is still quite poor, but I did not want to go back to Perl, so I checked Python and the Python Web Frameworks like Django, Turbogears, Pylon and web2py. There are many things to think about, ...


9

You can do remote debugging of python web apps over TCP/IP with winpdb.


9

Django = old Web2py = new Anything Django does, web2py does better. This is because web2py was made long after django and has learned from Django's mistakes, though it makes all new mistakes ;) Main difference, and what is keeping me in web2py: Django has incredible documentation...web2py is so intuitive that it doesn't need as much...HOWEVER! I have ...


9

As is, your model will not store the image in the database -- instead, it will store the image on the filesystem, with its new filename stored in the database (in the 'picture' field). If you want to store the image itself in the database, use the following: db.define_table=('images', Field('picture', 'upload', uploadfield='picture_file') ...


9

Whatever framework you choose, there will be a learning curve you won't get rid of. Django is a batteries included style framework: comments, authentication, users and groups - it's all integrated and you can start using it right away. I personally like microframeworks a bit more - especially for small experimental projects. You'll have your web application ...



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