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7

These <%@ are directives. For an exhaustive list and documentation see MSDN. When used, directives can be located anywhere in an .aspx or .ascx file, though standard practice is to include them at the beginning of the file. Each directive can contain one or more attributes (paired with values) that are specific to that directive. The <% ...


6

There is nothing buit-in the framework that allows you to do this. You may take a look at MVCContrib portable areas which allows you to embed and reuse views between multiple ASP.NET MVC applications. You may also find the following blog post useful. Disclaimer: both those approaches rely on writing a custom VirtualPathProvider which doesn't work with ...


6

<%# ... %> Data-binding expressions are an important set of code delimiters, which are used to create a binding between a server control property and a data source. More about it here: ASP.NET Code Delimiters


4

Unless you have a specific reason, then IMHO no. Razor is a little, tiny bit (~5% according to most sources) slower than WebForms views however this may be old information. At best, they will render exactly the same speed. I have seen nothing to suggest razor is faster at rendering than webforms(ASP.NET MVC 3 Razor performance) and offers absolutely ...


4

I don't think there is a performance aspect. However, I find the Razor syntax beautifully terse. The HTML is far more prominent with Razor, which is what you want when you're developing HTML views. In various MVC frameworks, view development encourages and requires code written directly alongside markup. Because the ASPX view engine was not ...


4

You could also use the Telerik open source controls for MVC and do something like : <%= Html.Telerik().StyleSheetRegistrar() .DefaultGroup(group => group .Add("stylesheet.css")); in the head section and <%= Html.Telerik().ScriptRegistrar() .DefaultGroup(group => group ...


3

Yes, you can write like that. However, it is often referred to as "spaghetti code", and the best practice would be to use a helper method. public static class ImageHelper { public static MvcHtmlString Image(this HtmlHelper html, string sourcePath, object htmlAttributes) { return html.Image(sourcePath, new ...


3

<%= xxx %> Inserts the text in xxx into the page at that location. (more info) <%: xxx %> Same as above except it html encodes the text for your convenience - (Except if xxx is an HtmlString which indicates it is already encoded) <%# xxx %> Same as the first one too except xxx is only evaluated when DataBind() is called on the form (not ...


3

The following article describes them pretty well. <%=: Rendering Code Syntax <%: %>: HTML encoded renedring (same usage as <%=) <%# %>: Data Binding Syntax - works with server side controls in classic WebForms applications, inapplicable in MVC


3

In the O'Reilly book "Programming ASP.NET MVC 4" by Jess Chawick there is a chapter describing what you need. "CHAPTER 15 - Reusable UI Components" Basically you create Class Library project with your views. You have to install RazorGenerator and set it as Custom Tool in the properties of the .cshtml files. This will generate C# code from the .cshtml files. ...


3

Try adding this to the AppSettings in Web.Config: <add key="webpages:Enabled" value="false" />


2

If you're using MVC3 & Razor, the best way to add per-page items to your section is to: 1) Call RenderSection() from within your layout page 2) Declare a corresponding section within your child pages: /Views/Shared/_Layout.cshtml: <head> <!-- ... Rest of your head section here ... -> @RenderSection("HeadArea") </head> ...


2

Be careful though as if you have something like this: <%= Html.Encode(Model.Foo) %> you might get double encoding when you end up with: <%: Html.Encode(Model.Foo) %> Whereas the correct would be: <%: Model.Foo %> Personally I tend to always use: <%= Html.DisplayFor(x => x.Foo) %> So, it's not as easy as a simple search ...


2

Its used in conjunction with Databind.Eval as in <%# DataBinder.Eval(Container.DataItem, "Price") %> Here is an MSDN page onthe matter


2

Here is an example: In your "Model class": public class TennisCourt { [Key] public int ID { get; set; } [Display(Name = "Extérieur ?")]//=Outside in french [Column("Outside")] public bool Outside { get; set; } } In your "View Index" @model IEnumerable<TennisOnline.Models.TennisCourt> @{ ViewBag.Title = "Index"; Layout = ...


2

Solved it by myself. After a lot of researching, I've found following snippet, which helped me: private void RenderViewPage(ViewContext context, ViewPage page) { if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(MasterPath)) { page.MasterLocation = MasterPath; } else { if ...


2

I'm not sure if all these WebForm tags have a proper collective name, but they should all be covered in ASP.NET Page Syntax. There's another that's not on the list, ASP.NET Expressions: <%$ expressionPrefix: expressionValue %>


2

Try add reference to System.Data.Linq.dll in your project


2

<%$ %> is the expression syntax. There are some built in shortcuts for AppSettings, Resources and ConnectionStrings. You can also write your own. <%# %> is the databinding expression syntax. This is used in databound controls to resolve property values from the object being bound.


2

I clipped this text from a book (I can't remember which book) a while ago as I thought it explained the <%# %> syntax well - Those of you familiar with classic ASP applications might think that the <%# %> syntax looks very familiar. It is similar in purpose, but you need to make sure that you don't confuse the two because doing so could ...


2

I'm not sure what you are asking. What do you mean by "razor scripts"? Do you mean a razor partial? In that case, then yes. An aspx view can call a razor partial just fine (and vice versa). If you mean embed a chunk of razor inside of an aspx/ascx, then no. Razor is intended for MVC 3, but people have successfully gotten it working in MVC 2. Such as ...


1

Solved kind of the same problem but the approach was little different. Suppose you have alternative views tree in Theme folder then you have to set in your class MyViewEngine derived from WebFormViewEngine: base.MasterLocationFormats = new[] { "~/Theme/Views/{1}/{0}.master", ...


1

In short No. You can use Razor and the WebForms view engines alongside each other, but you cannot mix them in the same view. Besides, as far as I know, you can't use Razor with ASP.NET MVC 2 either although I'm not 100% sure on that last one.


1

You can use a HttpModule to manipulate the response HTML and move any CSS/script references to the appropriate places. This isn't ideal, and I'm not sure of the performance implications, but it seems like the only way to resolve the issue without either (a) a javascript-based solution, or (b) working against MVC principles.


1

If your controller action needs to return the HTML result of the execution of this display template you could simply indicate the path to this template and pass the required model: public ActionResult SomeAjaxAction() { var company = FetchCompanyFromSomewhere(); return View("~/Views/Home/DisplayTemplates/Company.ascx", company); } As far as ...


1

Look at link text this cheat sheet. ASP.NET MVC not use WebForms IHttpHandler. It is using MvcHandler from MvcRouteHandler. ViewPage class invoke in ViewEngine. MVC model2 architecture style is not Page Controller style.


1

You could have the partial view load in a javascript block that drops in the style to the head, but that would be silly considering that you probably want the javascript block in the head section for the same reason. I recently discovered something pretty cool though. You can serialize a partial view into a string and send it back to the client as part of a ...


1

Alternatively, you could probably use some of the techniques I've described in this answer: how to change the themes in asp.net mvc 2 It's on MVC3 and Razor, but everything except the View should work just fine on MVC 1 as well.


1

Here's a method that will let you render a ViewResult to a string. The only tricky part to using it in your context will be to Mock up a viable ControllerContext. static string RenderPartialViewToString(ControllerContext context, ViewResultBase partialViewResult) { Require.ThatArgument(partialViewResult != null); Require.That(context != ...


1

Razor is the preferred View Engine for MVC, ASPX View Engine is the legacy View Engine and this option is there for backward compatibility. Here you will find a great article who explain the differences between both.



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