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3

Misultin hasn't been maintained for the last 3 years. It's possible that it doesn't support current websocket standards. At some point, I ended up switching my systems from Misultin to Cowboy due to websocket compatibility. This may not be the issue you are having, but there's a good chance that it is.


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Any modern single server is able to server thousands of clients at once. Its HTTP server software has just to be is Event-Driven (IOCP) oriented (we are not in the old Apache one connection = one thread/process equation any more). Even the HTTP server built in Windows (http.sys) is IOCP oriented and very efficient (running in kernel mode). From this point of ...


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It is called a heartbeat and is usually sent by the client every 5 seconds with a ping frame (0x09) as opcode while the server responds with a pong frame (0xA) as opcode. In theory it doesn't really matter whether it's the server or client initiating the heartbeat, but in a real-world situation it is usually better that the client keep itself updated ...


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The pages where the WebSocket connection fails have a Content-Security-Policy header with the connect-src directive set to only allow connections to a set of whitelisted domains. This means that all connections from that page to any non-whitelisted domain will fail. Its not clear how you're running this code. It seems possible that Chrome allows ...


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There is no overhead to establish a new connection with a statically open web socket (as the connection is already open and established), but when you're making a request half way around the world, networking takes some time so there's latency when you're talking to a server half way around the world. That's just how networking works. You get a near ...


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If you read the WebSocket spec, RFC 6455, you will see that WebSocket packets are framed, where each frame has its own header and payload. Remember that TCP is a streaming transport. Senders and receivers are not paying attention to the TCP frames, they are paying attention to the payloads within those frames. A WebSocket sender will send a WebSocket ...


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If you want to access the socket.io server from outside you LAN, you must use public IP (and possibly avoid the use of port 3000). In a production environment you must use a fronted proxy (like nginx) to translate requests to your socket.io server to the private LAN address. Following example in the nginx blog you can use something like this: location ...


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No, you must not ignore continuation frames. If you don't implement them, your WebSocket implementation will not conform to RFC6455. Continuation frames are for fragmented WebSocket messages. All frames but the first are called continuation frames. All but the first and last are called non-final continuation frames.


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Without any code, I am really only guessing here. http://socket.io/docs/#sending-and-receiving-events Above, you will find code and I will copy it. Basically, you need to listen to the 'disconnect' event on the socket and remove your reference of the client from whatever array you are using to keep track of your clients. socket.on('disconnect', function () ...


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Looking at your code you are using separate http instances for serving page and socket.io. If you change that to use the same http server you can use relative URL for socket.io connection.


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You could try out this this link. You need NodeJS and NPM. Then, install every dependencies: $ npm install Open a websocket for each port you want: $ node demo/server.js 9001 9002 9003 Then connect your client using your code you posted.


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The easiest and the approved choice of server for Websockets is Thin Currently we are using a Thin cluster in production with Websocket-Rails handling around hundreds and sometime thousands of people. It's pretty stable and easy on resources. P.S : Even Discourse uses Thin for their socket implementation.


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The reasons for supporting Server Sent Events are outlined in the Chat demo project: Server Sent Events (SSE) is an elegant web technology for efficiently receiving push notifications from any HTTP Server. It can be thought of as a mix between long polling and one-way WebSockets and contains many benefits over each: Simple - Server Sent Events is just a ...


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I recently created an open-source project to do this with Firebase. Basically, you need to create your DataSource and override the fetch, retrieveRecords and commitRecords methods. Below is how I did it with Firebase, but you'll definitely need to make modifications to use websockets. You may also want to checkout the Thoth project. It hasn't been updated ...



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