New answers tagged

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If you want to run your program at startup, I suggest to create a dedicated service. System and service manager You can define your service by using the following lines, or directly call you script named modem.sh ExecStartPre=/bin/sh -c 'sleep 120' ExecStart=/usr/bin/wvdial &


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Have you considered using zeromq for this task? It is easy to use and provides high level implementation of common patterns. From zeromq guide ZeroMQ (also known as ØMQ, 0MQ, or zmq) looks like an embeddable networking library but acts like a concurrency framework. It gives you sockets that carry atomic messages across various transports like ...


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From the side of the server an unclean disconnect (no disconnect messages sent) is indistinguishable from a very slow connection. What you need to do is have some sort of heartbeat. WebSockets has pings on the protocol level for this. If your library exposes this, then set the ping to a delay you are willing to accept, and add a handler for when this ...


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This is a typical problem with qt console programs, you need to call your client methods outside of the python constructor (__init__). I modified your server a little bit, adding some error tests (nothing really new): from PyQt5 import QtCore, QtWebSockets, QtNetwork, QtGui from PyQt5.QtWidgets import QApplication, QMainWindow, QMenu, QAction from ...


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Using secure WebSockets requires an SSL cert, and using a self-signed cert is an option. There is a tutorial which may be useful for getting this set up. Using WebSockets on Managed VMs may present other problems though due to port forwarding issues from the appspot.com frontend. There is a public issue which details this as well as another question on ...


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I found my problem what is it . @OnMessage public String onMessage(Session session, String message) { Gson gson = new Gson(); SocketMessage sm = gson.fromJson(message, new SocketMessage().getClass()); if (sm.getEvent().equals("teklif")) { //SoncketTestMessage fromJson = gson.fromJson(test.getData(), SoncketTestMessage.class); ...


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You may not have provided enough output space for deflate(). Does deflate() return Z_STREAM_END?


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I just spot new topic on the blog of one company who providing cloud solution and "Server-end/Service as a Platform" (SaaS) for games. I'm not advertising this company, nor I used them, so I don't even know how good or bad they are. However, they very clearly explain reasons and what are the benefits of using WebSockets in REST Have a read on their blog


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You can look at this: socketIO-client As an example, from socketIO_client import SocketIO socketIO = SocketIO('localhost', 8000)


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Is there a proper WebSocket library for whatever technology you implement the desktop client in? The websocket protocol is not trivial and it's a rather new technology which is not universally supported yet. When you have to implement WebSocket from scratch using pure TCP/IP sockets you can plan to spend a few days until you have the basic protocol ...


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A WebSocket is a point-to-point connection, so nobody else can connect to that particular socket. If you're using current cyphers for the TLS, then this should be secure (there are cyphers out there which are being deprecated at the moment since they are/may be broken). For a non-TLS WebSocket connection the same goes as for anything done over regular HTTP ...


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Run curl -i -N -H "Connection: Upgrade" -H "Upgrade: websocket" -H "Host: echo.websocket.org" -H "Origin: http://www.websocket.org" http://echo.websocket.org Where http://www.websocket.org is host origin, and echo.websocket.org is endpoint for websocket. Those flags say: Return headers in the output Don’t buffer the response Set a header that this ...


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It depends on your exact use case: WebSockets are established by first doing a HTTP connection and then upgrading this to the WebSocket protocol. Thus the overhead needed to exchange the first message considerably higher then with simple sockets. But if you just keep the connection open and exchange all messages through a single established socket then ...


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If you really must forge a fake 'origin' header value from javascript - there is a way. Its not something you will find in your generally accepted principles handbook, but here it is: Create a php file that invokes the socket, with a fake origin value. Now call the php file using ajax, from you javascript. It may not be elegant, ethical or acceptable, but ...


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Yes, This is possible. A web server will anyway respond to HTTP requests given that you have implemented servlet/s that match the paths clients are requesting. You can use a servlet container to host your servlets. When you say Sockets(not web sockets) I assume that you're talking about opening a port where Java server will be listening to any UDP or TCP ...


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When it comes to time-critical network communication for games, I'd recommend trying to use a binary format. Especially, if you are going to use it with WebGL, where you end up with Float32 anyway. So for example, you could work with messages of three Float32 values (x, y and r: var socket = new WebSocket("ws://" + url) socket.binaryType = 'arraybuffer' ...


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If you need a persistent, full-duplex connection between the client and the server, then you should use WebSocket. If you are just blasting the same info from the server to a group of clients, use Server-Sent-Events which is a formalization of Comet (reverse AJAX) techniques... since Comet implementations weren't often interoperable. Btw, WebSocket is a ...


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Looking at the source for the version I'm using - 8.0.28, there's no dedicated option. The code deploying the endpoints is in org.apache.tomcat.websocket.server.WsSci. The quickest 'shurest' hack is to put my endpoints into the javax.websocket package. I elected to use their ServerApplicationConfig hook instead which serves my purposes if with some minor ...


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Your are using Session.getOpenSessions(). The Javadoc states: Return a copy of the Set of all the open web socket sessions that represent connections to the same endpoint to which this session represents a connection. The Set includes the session this method is called on. These sessions may not still be open at any point after the return of this ...


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Like JimB pointed out, you are not handling http nor websocket connections yet. You can do websocket handling with the package github.com/gorilla/websocket This is how a simple setup could look like: package main import ( "log" "net/http" "github.com/gorilla/websocket" ) // wsHandler implements the Handler Interface type wsHandler ...


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Figured it out. Added this to the client when it creates the connection with the hub. _hubConnection.DeadlockErrorTimeout = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(120); //default is 10 seconds


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Shortest answer was to indeed modify the proxied apps source code individually. So now they use var io = require('socket.io')(http, { path: '/proxy/yourApplication'} This post addressed the problem. http://stackoverflow.com/a/31658307/2633577 However this answer is not the best because it is not 100% transparent to hosted apps.


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You can add exception handling using try catch blocks and log the errors to a log file. Like this: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/2344/Create-Simple-Error-Log-Files-using-ASP-NET-and-C Or you can log them to the event viewer if you want.


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This apparently is a server issue not a problem in the client. I don't know how the server looks like here. But this was a huge problem for me in the past when I was working on a websocket based project. The connection would continuously break. So I created a websocket server in java, and that resolved my problem. websockets depend on lots of settings, ...


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To get the socket ids: Object.keys(io.nsps['/'].adapter.rooms[roomName].sockets)


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SignalR client cannot connect to any websocket. First, websocket is just one transport that SignalR uses but not the only one. If the client cannot connect to the server it will by default automatically switch to a different transport (e.g. server sent events or long polling). Second, SignalR uses a protocol to talk to the server (if you are interested you ...


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Have a look at rserve-js - it is a full Rserve client for JavaScript and it supports both OCAP and plain QAP mode (including OOB callbacks). We use it in RCloud very extensively which is also possibly a good source to look for its use (in OCAP mode which is more secure and suitable for web applications) - it particular since it actually does what you're ...


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Making my comment into an answer since it solved your problem: Socket.io is using ping and pong as message names itself internal to the implementation. Change to different message names.


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Play doesn't support WebSocket client connections. The best option is probably to use AsyncHttpClient, this is the library that Play's WS API is built on so it will already be on your classpath, instructions for accessing WebSockets using it are here: https://github.com/AsyncHttpClient/async-http-client


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If you want to use base64 encoded image as a source for the image object, it needs to be in format: data:image/png;base64,<base64 encoded image> You need to prepend data:image/png;base64, to your base64 string img.src = "data:image/png;base64,"+imgdata[2]; You are also parsing your messages wrong. imgdata[0] is supposed to be your width, but it ...


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This resonates with "Nagle's algorithm" ... the TCP stack could be configured to bundling requests before sending them over the wire to reduce traffic. This would explain the symptoms, but worth a try


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Should the client resent some type of message to instruct the server endpoint to do a tcp close? (a) That's exactly what the CLOSE FRAME message is for, and (b) no, the server must close the TCP connection immediately, as per the text you quoted. or should the server do a tcp close on retrieval of a close frame? That's exactly what it says. After ...


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As you noted, the RFC says: If an endpoint receives a Close frame and did not previously send a Close frame, the endpoint MUST send a Close frame in response. This applies to both the server and the client. So, when the Close originates from the Client, the following would happen: Client sends Close frame Server receives Close frame and echoes it back ...


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Consider the case where the server just goes away, maybe it crashes. Who or what will notify the client of this? Or say a network link close to the server is down for so long that by the time it comes back up, the server has totally forgotten about this client. Who or what would tell the client? There are three possibilities: The client does not need to ...


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Think of the websocket connection itself as a separate thing. A socket used by a client can subscribe to many different events. What you're describing is topics. When the websocket connection is established, you send a message using whatever socket framework you're using to subscribe to a topic. For example, it could be a topic called customer-123. (A ...


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I suggest you use a publish/subscribe framework and rely on the implementation of that framework to scale. You seem to be solving a problem that has been solved many times before. Search for ActiveMQ publish/subscribe, Kaazing JMS, Kaazing AMQP, Pusher, IBM MQTT/WS, etc.


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If you are building a real chat system, you should use a chat protocol, e.g., XMPP (there are others). This gives you deeper chat semantics that using low-level WebSocket, which is a transport protocol, not really an application-level protocol. If you want to chat over the web, then you need XMPP to use either HTTP (using BOSH, which is HTTP-based) or ...


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Like any other production application, you need authentication (who is allowed to use the app) and authorization (what functionality can a authenticated user perform). Authorization (ie, access control - ACL) is probably more precisely what you are looking for. Your app has to consult an authorization subsystem to see if the current user has access ...


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Here a sample. First you have to install Asp.net SignalR package along with its dependenies. You have call the SignalR when the app starts namespace ABC { public partial class Startup { public void Configuration(IAppBuilder app) { ConfigureAuth(app); app.MapSignalR(); <--{Add this line} } ...


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In RFC 2782 A DNS RR for specifying the location of services (DNS SRV) it states Currently, one must either know the exact address of a server to contact it, or broadcast a question. The SRV RR allows administrators to use several servers for a single domain, to move services from host to host with little fuss, and to designate some ...


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Look into scaleout with SignalR: http://www.asp.net/signalr/overview/performance/scaleout-in-signalr You can use a backplane to connect all the servers in your web farm to a single message bus.


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The DefaultWebSocketConnectionRegistry supports only one connection by key, but you can use your own impl of a registry to have a list per key. Why do you need the second connection? Usually an application needs just one connection and uses the structure of the response message (e.g. JSON with some differentiator key) to decide how to process it in the ...


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WebSocket is not supports in old Windows releases such as Windows 7. You might upgrade to a newer release such as Windows 10.


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Try this http://socket.io/blog/native-socket-io-and-android/ It,s the android client of popular socket.io... I have made an app using it and its great


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Since nobody replied, I want to provide you with an approach I now try to pursue. I use Laravel to write the API. It comes with an out-of-the-box support for Redis, which is awesome to Broadcasts Events -> https://laravel.com/docs/5.1/events The following is just a quick example: Redis::publish('test', json_encode($data)); Those events are received ...


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Based on your description of the problem, it is not necessary. The delay between when the http stack receives your message and when it passes it to you in the application so it can be programmatically logged is negligible and almost certainly below the precision of the javascript datetime value (you could use performance.now, but I have my doubts as to how ...


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I use two-layer scheme on client: abstract-wrapper + websocket-client: The responsibilities of the websocket-client are interacting with a server, recovering the connection and providing interfaces (event-emitter and some methods) to abstract-wrapper. The abstract-wrapper is a high-level layer, which interacts with websocket-client, subscribes to its ...


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Use tryAccept to return either the result of the future when it is redeemed, or an error: def socketTest = WebSocket.tryAccept[JsValue] { request => futureJsonVariable.map { json => val in = Iteratee.ignore[JsValue] val out = Enumerator(json).andThen(Enumerator.eof) Right((in, out)) } recover { case err => ...


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You should set this on both side of your peers, i.e on your server(peer) side where you receive the message as well your peer which receive message from server. @OnMessage(maxMessageSize = 1024 * 1024) public void onBinaryMessage(Session session, ByteBuffer msg) { //todo }


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Ok, I think I finally found the answer. Charles 3.11.2 works perfectly with WebSocket. I use socketIO so I've already seen http requests sent during the negotiation phase but I missed websockets traffic. In the begging socketIO try to use polling then swtiches to use websockets. The websocket traffic is visible when you go to the request with status: ...



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