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322

3 things to remember: set the android:layout_width of the children to "0dp" set the android:weightSum of the parent (edit: as Jason Moore noticed, this attribute is optional, because by default it is set to the children's layout_weight sum) set the android:layout_weight of each child proportionally (e.g. weightSum="5", three children: layout_weight="1", ...


165

You have to use TableLayout.LayoutParams with something like this: TextView tv = new TextView(v.getContext()); tv.setLayoutParams(new TableLayout.LayoutParams(LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT, LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT, 1f)); The last parameter is the weight.


36

The answer is that you have to use TableRow.LayoutParams, not LinearLayout.LayoutParams or any other LayoutParams. TextView tv = new TextView(v.getContext()); LayoutParams params = new TableRow.LayoutParams(0, LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT, 1f); tv.setLayoutParams(params); The different LayoutParams are not interchangeable and if you use the wrong one then ...


22

I would personally prefer to use List<string>: No need to remember one specific type just for strings It implements the generic IEnumerable<T> rather than just IEnumerable, and thus supports LINQ It's supported in SilverLight It's more idiomatic for most developers (IMO) I would be really surprised to find StringCollection to be significantly ...


20

R = randsample([1 2 3], N, true, [0.3 0.1 0.2]) randsample is included in the Statistics Toolbox Otherwise you can use some kind of roulette-wheel selection process. See this similar question (although not MATLAB specific). Here's my one-line implementation: a = 1:3; %# possible numbers w = [0.3 0.1 0.2]; %# corresponding weights N = 10; ...


20

I'd do it like this: /** * ISO-3166-1 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_3166-1 */ var $countries = array ( 'AF' => 'Afghanistan', 'AX' => 'Åland Islands', 'AL' => 'Albania', 'DZ' => 'Algeria', 'AS' => 'American Samoa', 'AD' => 'Andorra', 'AO' => 'Angola', 'AI' => 'Anguilla', 'AQ' => ...


20

As long as the graph does not contain a directed cycle of negative edges, it will have a shortest path between any two points, but Dijkstra's algorithm is not designed to find them. The best-known algorithm for finding single-source shortest paths in a directed graph with negative edge weights is the Bellman-Ford algorithm. This comes at a cost, however: ...


19

It's android:layout_weight. Weight can only be used in LinearLayout. If the orientation of linearlayout is Vertical, then use android:layout_height="0dp" and if the orientation is horizontal, then use android:layout_width = "0dp". It'll work perfectly.


17

Is there a way to get a percentage value (0..100%) out of android:layout_weight? Sure. Make them add up to 100. For your "percentage value", you want the android:layout_height of the individual items within the LinearLayout to be 0px.


15

bolder is a relative font weight: The 'bolder' and 'lighter' values select font weights that are relative to the weight inherited from the parent bolder and lighterare even part of the official spec. How they are interpreted and displayed is up to the browser. The fact that they appear the same visually is because most browsers don't properly support ...


13

FILL_PARENT makes it take up all available space. Weight makes it take up a relative amount. Example: say you have two boxes, A and B, added to a horizontal LinearLayout in that order. If A is set to WRAP_CONTENT and B is set to FILL_PARENT, your layout is [A][+++++B+++++] Whereas if you instead have A's weight set to 2 and B's weight set to 2, ...


12

In terms of performance and efficiency, they will be very similar. List<string> might be a little faster actually. It is kindof a wrapper around the pre-generic ArrayList. There's no boxing/unboxing, but there is still an extra step or two under the hood, IIRC. StringCollection was handy before .NET 2.0 because it was strongly typed to string, ...


11

You can access the edge weight as G[u][v]['weight'] or by iterating over the edge data. So you can e.g. In [1]: import networkx as nx In [2]: G=nx.DiGraph() In [3]: G.add_edge(1,2,weight=10) In [4]: G.add_edge(2,3,weight=20) In [5]: G[2][3]['weight'] Out[5]: 20 In [6]: G[2][3]['weight']=200 In [7]: G[2][3]['weight'] Out[7]: 200 In [8]: ...


11

This is what Solr's DismaxQueryParser was designed for. See http://wiki.apache.org/solr/DisMaxRequestHandler There are a lot of parameters, but the main one you need to customize is "qf", which is how you specify what fields should be searched and the boost for each. So if you want title to dominate, you might specify something like: title^10 ...


9

This sounds pretty strange because the manipulation of the form elements' #weight parameter always works reliably for me as advertised. One thing to note, though, is that the weights only affect the order relative to the elements siblings, so if the element you want to move around is on a level below that of the other elements, you'd have to change the ...


9

Maybe something like this Manipulate[ DynamicModule[{mags, pts, bkgrnd, corners}, corners = N@Table[{Sin[2 Pi i/n], Cos[2 Pi i/n]}, {i, n}]; mags = N@Table[1/n, {n}]; pts = mags corners; bkgrnd = {{FaceForm[Opacity[0]], EdgeForm[Gray], Polygon[ Table[r corners, {r, .2, 1, .2}]]}, Table[ Text[Row[{"Criterion ", i}], 1.05 ...


9

When we use the wieght width should be Zero try with width 0 for with children inside the container............. LinearLayout.LayoutParams p1 = new LinearLayout.LayoutParams(0,LinearLayout.LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT); LinearLayout.LayoutParams p2 = new LinearLayout.LayoutParams(0,LinearLayout.LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT);


9

Find the maximum first; since your data is sorted, that'll be the last value; then simply divide the rest by that value: from __future__ import division maxval = a[-1] weights = [elem / maxval for elem in a] Demo: >>> maxval = a[-1] >>> [elem / maxval for elem in a] [0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0] The from __future__ import division import ...


8

This is the best I could do, try changing the strings to see if it works as intended. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> <TableLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" android:layout_width="fill_parent" android:layout_height="fill_parent" android:shrinkColumns="0,2" android:stretchColumns="0,2"> ...


7

Here's an algorithm which doesn't require adding the items multiple times to a list. It can also work with non-integer weights, although if you're using NextDouble from System.Random, you'll have to scale all of the weights to add up to 1, or multiply the value from NextDouble with S to get it in the desired range. Given a list L of items (I,W), where I is ...


7

Do the following things. U can solve your problem. set the android:layout_width of the children to "0dp" set the android:weightSum of the parent set the android:layout_weight of each child proportionally (e.g. weightSum = "5", three children: layout_weight="1", layout_weight="3", layout_weight="1")


7

I accepted your challenge and attempted to create the layout you describe in response to my comment. You are right. It is surprisingly difficult to accomplish. Besides that, I do like shooting house flies. So I jumped on board and came up with this solution. Extend the existing layout classes rather than creating your own from scratch. I went with ...


7

just set layout params in that layout like create param variable android.widget.LinearLayout.LayoutParams params = new android.widget.LinearLayout.LayoutParams( LayoutParams.MATCH_PARENT, LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT, 1f); 1f is weight variable set your widget or layout like TextView text = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.text); ...


6

The problem you are describing is called the Bin Packing Problem. No-one knows the optimal way to solve it. If they did they would be able to prove P=NP or P!=NP - one of the big open questions in computing. The Wikipedia page includes references to some example algorithms - first fit algorithm, best fit decreasing, first fit decreasing. In general a fast ...


6

I haven't used Solr, but I've used Lucene. In looking at: http://wiki.apache.org/solr/SolrQuerySyntax It states that Solr's query syntax is a superset of Lucene's. And in Lucene, the way you can perform per-field boosts is to use the carrot operator followed by some arbitrary value, i.e. title:batman^10 alternative_title:batman The advantage of doing ...


6

Nice greedy solution: for the first place take maximum number. For each next place take maximum from untaken numbers before that satisfy your condition. If you place all numbers - you have found a solution. Otherwise the solution doesn't exist, why - it's an exercise for you. My proof: imagine a solution exists. Show, that my algorithm will find it. Let's ...


6

This should work ORDER BY (.3 * RELEVANCE) + (.7 * CLICK_RATE) DESC DEMO Update from comments to make top 3 results sort by click_rate, and the rest sort by relevance You'd need to first identify the first 3 using a subquery and do the ordering SELECT test.id, test.relevance, test.click_rate, top_3_click_rate.id ...


6

This work for me, and I hope it will work for you also Set the LayoutParams for the parent view first: myTableLayout.setLayoutParams(new TableLayout.LayoutParams(TableLayout.LayoutParams.FILL_PARENT, TableLayout.LayoutParams.FILL_PARENT)); then set for the TextView (child): TableLayout.LayoutParams textViewParam = new ...



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