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try this: You can force your program to run in Administrator mode You'll want to modify the manifest that gets embedded in the program. This works on VS2008 and higher: Project + Add New Item, select "Application Manifest File". Change the <requestedExecutionLevel> element to: <requestedExecutionLevel level="requireAdministrator" uiAccess="false" ...


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Please try to run your software with Run as Administrator .


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It's better to use StreamWriter in using block to avoid keeping the file locked by mistake anywhere else in your code using (StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(path) ) { sw.WriteLine(richTextBox1.Text); sw.WriteLine(richTextBox2.Text); }


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Your StreamWriter can't write to that file because it is being used by another process. Try using Process Explorer to determine what process is locking that file. (Once you run Process Explorer, hit Ctrl-F to search for a handle or dll substring and try looking for part of that filename, e.g., "2014Essay".)


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remove the .suo file? while the solution is closed remove the .suo file and then open the solution to recreate it. it may be restoring the screen sizes from when you last opened the file.


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Dim chkbx As New DataGridViewCheckBoxColumn() DataGridView1.Columns.Add(chkbx) chkbx.HeaderText = "Check Box" chkbx.Name = "checkBox" or manually AddColumn... -> Type = DataGridViewCheckBoxColumn valter


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I will recommend you to move the ComputerId variable to "Program Class" inside Program.cs file, like this: public class Program { public static int ComputerId; //Main and other methods...... } Now you can access this variable from all of your forms simply like this: int cid=Program.ComputerId; As Simple As That.


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In newdetails form: private addNew _addNew { get; set; } public newdetails(addNEw parent) { InitializeComponent(); _addNew = parent; } //you can access any public variable at addNew form with: int test = _addNew.PublicVariableName in your addnew form: newetails x = new newdetails(this); x.Show();


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You can add a parameterized constructor to newdetails form. And then pass the integer value there. Something like this: // In newdetails form private int computerId; public newdetails(int compId){ computerId = compId; } // in addnew form newdetails nd = new newdetails(ComputerId);


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This code-block belongs to the form2 where you open your addnew-form addnew testObj = new addnew(); //init testObj.show() //or testObj.showDialog(); int id = testObj.ComputerId; //getting the id


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To get a reference to the empty textbox you use almost the same solution as R.T. presents, but use FirstOrDefault instead: var emptyTextBox = Controls.OfType<TextBox>().FirstOrDefault(t => string.IsNullOrEmpty(t.Text) if (emptyTextBox != null) { // there is a textbox that has no Text set // set focus, present error message etc. on ...


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Set the focus on the control while in your loop, then break when done. foreach(Control c in Controls) { if (c is TextBox) { if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(c.Text)) { txtCompleted = false; c.Focus(); MessageBox.Show(errorMessage); break; ...


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This answer applies to VB.NET. I plan on turning this into C# for a DLL, but for now it's in vb.net because that's where I started this idea from and the language the project is in. Here's what I have so far: ToolStripMenuItemExt Purpose: My custom ToolStripMenuItem. ToolStripMenuItemExt has a CheckListSheet which contains a reference to ...


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I think that you should have this row after the insert statement: adapter.Update(LogPassDataSet.TableDataTable); Regards.


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Dim arrPic as byte() = /*Load the image as array of byte Convert byte() to BASE64 */ Dim sIMGBASE64 as String = Convert.ToBase64String(arrPic)) /*Add the BASE64 stream to the parameters*/ paramList1.Add(New ReportParameter(<sparamname>, sIMGBASE64) On the Report set the "Value" property of Picture Box like this: ...


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I think what you're looking for is DesignData. This allows you to specify design-time data that can be populated in your custom control during the Design Process. The basic workflow is to create a XAML data context file and add it to your project with the Build Type of DesignData and then to apply the d:DesignData property in the DataTemplate of your ...


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This is why you don't edit the designer code. It's specifically designed to not maintain these types of changes. You should be subscribing to the event in the object's constructor, load event, or some similar location.


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This is what the MSDN has to say about static constructors: A static constructor is called automatically to initialize the class before the first instance is created or any static members are referenced. A static constructor cannot be called directly. The user has no control on when the static constructor is executed in the program. ...


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Yes, static constructor will run regardless of design time or run time. A simple test can prove it. public class MyComponent : Component { static string someVar = "Static constructor not yet run"; static MyComponent() { someVar = "Static constructor run"; MessageBox.Show(someVar); } public MyComponent() { ...


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You don't want to use Thread.Sleep in your program because Thread.Sleep will stop your program from running during the sleep. It won't respond to clicks and moves etc. What you want is a Timer which will let your program run normally and will raise an event on a 3 second interval. You would do something like this: public class MyFrom : Form { private ...


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You can register an event handler for the CheckedChanged event of the RadioButton: RadioButton taskRb = new RadioButton(); taskRb.CheckedChanged += new EventHandler(taskRb_CheckedChanged); taskRb.Text = DataGridTable.getTasks()[i].name.ToString(); taskRb.Checked = false; ToolStripControlHost tRb = new ToolStripControlHost(taskRb); ...


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If I understand your requirements, what you actually want is a Watermark/Cue banner implementation. But since I could be monstruosly wrong, here is an implementation of what you're trying to accomplish. private void MainForm_Load(object sender, EventArgs e) { foreach (Control c in this.Controls) { if (c is TextBox) { ...


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comboBox1.DroppedDown = true; This has already been answered here Open ComboBox DropDown programmatically [duplicate] which was actually a duplicate of Winforms: how to open combobox properly?


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Use the DroppedDown Property and make it true, private void comboBox1_MouseHover(object sender, EventArgs e) { var box = sender as ComboBox ; box.DroppedDown = true; }


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It looks like you are not openning your connection object. (**On a side note the OracleConnection is a deprecated class.) This link should give you a good example to work with (for .Net Framework 4.5) http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.data.oracleclient.oracleconnection(v=vs.110).aspx You should end up with something approaching: using ...


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Disappearance of my controls from my form, is an experience I have undergone, too. Somewhere, maybe on MSDN, I read, do not change the InitializeComponent(), but leave it, untouched and unaltered, to the machine to compile that part of the code. Well, I have often attached and changed and taken away delegates, successfully, inside the InitializeComponent() ...


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The problem is fixed by putting the images inside the resources of many Class Library Projects. So the project can be divided to so many parts, each part has its own data that can be updated later with lower sizes.



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