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16

That's a special feature of Delphi of which there is no analogue in C#. In C# you need to override WndProc().


13

You're right. Addresses only have meaning within a single process. The PMyRec value you create in the first process is just a garbage address in the target process. To send an arbitrary block of memory to another process via a window message, you should use the wm_CopyData message. You give that message the address of the data and the size, and the OS takes ...


12

To stop at any call to an API function, find it in the implementation section of Windows.pas (or wherever the function of interest is declared) and set a breakpoint. That takes care of functions you use with load-time dynamic linking. For run-time dynamic linking (LoadLibrary and GetProcAddress), you'll need a different technique. The variable that gets the ...


11

The most obvious message I can think of is WM_DISPLAYCHANGE which is sent, at least, when the resolution is changed.


9

Older Delphi versions load the RichEdit control which is located in RICHED32.DLL. Newer Delphi versions load RICHED20.DLL. RICHED32.DLL exposes many problems, like yours. The fix is modifying comctrls.pas so that it loads RICHED20.DLL. That will most likely not be enough as there may be compatibility issues with this DLL and the VCL code. Look for the ...


8

To answer your question narrowly, each message in the queue stores, at the least, a window handle to which the message is directed, the message code, wParam and lParam, as you already correctly noted, the time when the message was posted, that you retrieve with GetMessageTime(), for UI messages, the position of the cursor when the message was posted (see ...


7

WM_NCCREATE is actually the very first message your window will receive, which will arrive before WM_CREATE. It is related to creating the non-client area (eg. title bar, system menu, etc), hence the NC prefix. WM_GETMINMAXINFO is sent before the window size/position is changed, and may arrive before WM_CREATE (see below for more). The WM_CREATE message ...


7

Is this table of any help? I'm not sure whether all Windows versions send all these message, but I'm pretty sure the codes aren't different between versions.


7

You need to listen for particular windows messages being delivered to the form. The easiest way to do this is to assign the WindowProc property of the form. Remember to keep a hold of the previous value of WindowProc and call it from your replacement. In your wrapper object declare a field like this: FOriginalWindowProc: TWndMethod; Then in the wrapper's ...


7

I figured out my issue: I'm also using WM_NCHITTEST, where I was NOT passing inherited;. I added this, and now it works fine.


7

SendKeys requires the application that you are sending the Keys to, to be active. From above Link: Use SendKeys to send keystrokes and keystroke combinations to the active application. I order to get around this limitation you will have to resort to using the WinApi Functions. FindWindow pInvoke.net FindWindowEx pInvoke.net sendMessage pInvoke.net ...


7

You must create a window to get the WM_DEVICECHANGE message. WM_DEVICECHANGE is a message that's broadcast, SendMessage(HWND_BROADCAST,...) style. Only top-level windows can receive it. The window doesn't need to be visible so there's little reason to look for an alternative. RegisterDeviceNotification() is an alternative. But that still needs a window. ...


6

Aside from the message name in the other answer, you are posting a message to Self.Handle while Self is going away. You probably meant to post to a different handle (the window that launched the modeless one). Give your modeless window access to that handle when you create it, and post the message there instead.


6

Note that WM_USER is not the correct constant to base your own messages on, unless you are writing a custom control directly descending from TWinControl. Use WM_APP instead. Also, it's considered good style to use UM_ for User Message instead of WM_ because that prefix is supposed to be reserved for the Windows header files.


6

Services don't generally receive window messages. They don't necessarily have window handles at all. Even if they do, they run in a separate desktop. Programs cannot send messages from one desktop to another, so a service can only receive messages from another service, or from a program started by a service. Before Windows Vista, you could have configured ...


6

You can give it a handle easily enough. Take a look at AllocateHWND in the Classes unit. Call this to create a handle for your data module, and define a simple message handler that will process UM_LOG_ON_OFF.


6

Spy++ comes with retail version of Visual Studio (Standard, Professional, Team) See also: I want Spy++ but I don't have Visual Studio


6

You have an issue with Unicode vs. Windows ANSI character encoding. Historically, Windows used an extended ASCII that they mis-named ANSI. This brought with it the need for code pages because even an 8-bit character does not provide enough code points to represent all of the European writing systems, let alone the rest of the world. When Win32 was developed, ...


6

Hit test messages doesn't seem to me to be the appropriate way to do this. For example, what if the user closes the form through the system menu, or through the Alt+F4 shortcut? I think that you should be responding to WM_SYSCOMMAND messages with wParam == SC_CLOSE. Windows Aero is fundamentally different when it comes to the handling of the non-client ...


6

I would just use lParam & 0x40000000. If that's non-zero, then b30 was set (I consider that the thirty first bit of the thirty two, by the way). And there's more likelihood that it will be a {logical-and, compare} operation rather than {shift, logical-and, compare}. Mind you, there's a good chance that a decent compiler would generate the more efficient ...


6

You can use SetCapture/ReleaseCapture Windows API to continue to get mouse events when the cursor moves outside the control.


5

What do you mean when you say it "uses" Windows Messaging System? Are you consuming or sending Windows Messages? If you send a Windows message, you need ensure you are doing it correctly. I'd suggest writing a message loop to ensure your messages are being dispatched properly. I'd also suggest reading up on message loops and how they work. What is a ...


5

Spy++ comes with Visual Studio.


5

If you have Visual Studio, that comes with Spy++, which does exactly this job. An alternative is Winspector - Ultimate Windows Message Spy


5

WM_RBUTTONDBLCLK.


5

Try WinSpy or Winspector


5

Yes you can. Use AllocateHWND to create a window handle. Then, you can set various properties (like the name), so you can find it using FindWindow.


5

Something that looks very similar can be done using .NET reflection and custom attributes. I think performance would be OK for production use, but not worth it since this still requires overriding WndProc to call the custom dispatcher, and once the WndProc is put into place, it takes one line of code to call the custom dispatcher OR 3 lines of code to write ...


5

You can allocate you own handle with AllocateHwnd and use that as a PostMessage target. TTestThread = class(TThread) private FSignalShutdown: boolean; // hidden window handle FWinHandle: HWND; protected procedure Execute; override; // our window procedure procedure WndProc(var msg: TMessage); public constructor ...



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