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13

The first error happens because an integer literal like 4 can be of any type with a Num instance. That is, 4 has the type (Num a) => a, so it can serve as an Integer, a Double, a Rational, etc. Since you applied 3 to an argument (4), it knows that, in context, 3 must be a function type (i.e. a0 -> t0 for some a0 and t0). But there's no Num instance ...


12

This idea lies at the core of functional programming: you are (usually) not modifying data in place. So you don't add an item to a list: you create a new list without modifying the old one. This allows for many nice things, sharing for instance, because you are never changing the old data and so you can keep referring to it. But it also imposes a burden if ...


11

Installed modules You have to use ghci's commands in order to load (:module +My.Module) and unload (:module -My.Module) installed modules. You can also use :m instead of :module in order to write less, like this: Prelude> :m +Data.List Prelude Data.List> sort [3,1,2] [1,2,3] Prelude Data.List> :m -Data.List Prelude> sort [3,1,2] ...


9

To see bindings you've made at the ghci prompt (e.g. with let or <-), try :show bindings. If you've loaded some modules, you can use :show modules to get the names of loaded modules and then :browse ModuleName to list everything in scope from that module.


9

:load loads your main program module. :module can be used to load additional modules: > :load BaseModule -- this is the one that contains 'main' > :module +AddedModule -- this is an additional library module You can also use :module to unload these additional modules: > :module -AddedModule -- after this @AddedModule@ will no longer be loaded ...


8

My intention is to complement ehird's answer with a little bit more explanation. When you wrote the expression 3 4 Then the Haskell interpreter thinks that you are trying to apply the function 3 to whatever 4 is. In order for Haskell to interpret 3 as a function, it needs to make a call to the function fromInteger :: Integer -> (a -> b) in order ...


8

You just specify the methods you do want to export on the module line: module NecessaryModule (addNumber1) where .... If you don't specify that line, it includes everything by default.


7

The problem was a bug with the hlint.ghci file shipped with HLint version 1.8.23 and below. HLint 1.8.24 is now available which fixes the problem, or use the online copy of hlint.ghci with an older version of HLint. This bug was tracked by http://code.google.com/p/ndmitchell/issues/detail?id=531 and I originally said I "will probably fix it later today".


7

Your misunderstanding is fundamental: cons does not destructively modify anything. 5:a (where a = [1,2,3]) evaluates to [5,1,2,3], and that is what the interpreter is showing you.


7

You can use :load with no arguments to clear all modules and bindings. To clear the prompt simply hit ctrl + s.


7

You can use the getArgs function to read arguments on the command line. For example: import System.Environment (getArgs) main = do args <- getArgs case args of [arg] -> putStrLn $ "You gave me one arg: " ++ arg _ -> putStrLn $ "You gave me " ++ show (length args) ++ " arguments." You can use the readFile function to read a ...


7

Ok, there are two things to consider : what ":module" know to find, and what is actually in context at a given prompt. :module always know how to find modules in installed packages (that are not hidden) and by default that's all that it has access to. But you can use :load to make it aware of some other modules in specific files. Each call of :load reset ...


7

When in ghci, use :browse or just :bro after loading the file. You may also browse unloaded modules via :browse Foo.Bar.Baz.


7

Haskell has a naming convention that's actually part of the language Functions start with lower case Constructors start with upper case So you need to change MapTuple to mapTuple As for what a constructor is, data Foo = ThisIsAConstructor It's basically a function that returns a Foo.


7

System.Directory.getCurrentDirectory


6

WinGHCi stores its command history in the registry. Just delete everything under HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Haskell\WinGHCi from the registry (use regedit). Additionally, please report this to the developer.


6

Let me illustrate with (+) as well as (:) Prelude> 4+5 9 Prelude> let z = 5 Prelude> z 5 Prelude> 4+z 9 Prelude> z 5 Prelude> let y = 4+z Prelude> y 9 Prelude> z 5 versus Prelude> let a = [1,2,3] Prelude> a [1,2,3] Prelude> 5:a [5,1,2,3] Prelude> a [1,2,3] Prelude> let b = 5:a Prelude> b [5,1,2,3] Prelude> a ...


4

Presumably you mean Haskell source files, because you can't use the :load command in GHCi for anything else. At the top of the source file that you load, include the line: import NecessaryModule For each of the source files, make sure to name the modules, e.g., module NecessaryModule where should appear. GHCi will automatically link all the files. If ...


4

Look at the IO routines provided: http://www.haskell.org/tutorial/io.html Another place to look is: http://book.realworldhaskell.org/read/io.html I think you need to write your program differently. WC should be parameterized by the file handle. Then you can do wc (openFile "quux.txt" ReadMode) at GHCi. Then you define your main function as main = wc ...


4

The first letter of data types must be a capital letter. wikipedia/haskell/type declarations


4

It opens in the last directory you opened a .hs or .lhs from. Try opening something from the folder you want, exit, restart. Did it restart where you were? Try working like that for a while, and if you like it (I do) then you're fine. If you really do want to go to the same place every time, perhaps there's a way. I can't find any setting to control ...


4

I find it easier to first navigate to the directory then invoke ghci. Once in Prelude you can use :l and the file name. Or, you could load ghci then use :l and use the fully qualified path for the file. Edit: After reading your edits, it is clear you are getting your code compiled fine. Once it says it has compiled, there is no reason to try and do so ...


4

I replaced that data declaration with: data Context hole root where CtxtNull :: Context a a CtxtCons :: (Data parent) => Left (hole -> rights) -> Right rights parent -> Context parent root -> Context hole root (i.e. just remove the forall clause) and it compiled.


4

GHC's "possible fix" messages are often very misleading, but this one is spot on. Why didn't you try it? Possible fix: add (Eq a) to the context of the instance declaration i.e. instance (Fractional a, Eq a) => Fractional [a] where ... This is needed because some Num instances may not allow equality comparison (in fact this instance is an ...


3

A poor man's solution to set the ghci prompt to the current working directory would be putting let cur fill = do { cwd <- System.Directory.getCurrentDirectory; return (":set prompt \"" ++ cwd ++ fill ++ " \""); } :def doprompt (\_ -> cur ">") :def mycd (\dir -> System.Directory.setCurrentDirectory dir >> cur ">") :doprompt in the ...


3

You can't use minBound and maxBound unless you declare beforehand what they mean for your type (which by the way is not a record type). You must, as the error also tells you, declare the type as an instance of Bounded. Without knowledge of what your type is to represent, it's impossible to say what such a declaration should look like exactly, but its general ...


3

The usual workflow for haskell programming is to put the function definition into a file and then load that file with ghci to test the function. To define functions (or variables) in ghci you need to use let like you would inside a do-block, i.e. let f x = x+1. To define functions, with type signatures or mutliple cases, separate the lines with ; like this: ...


3

Some comments on seeing your code: Only type names in Haskell start with Capital letter. So you have to fix this: positionChecker Pos ns = ... Don't use !! function, it's unsafe: λ> [0,1] !! 3 *** Exception: Prelude.(!!): index too large Always write type signature for your functions. That will help you in debugging your problem more easily. ...


2

Without access to your development environment or a listing of the errors that you're getting, I can only assume that the issue is related to the way that you've set up your PATH. GHC on Windows comes bundled with its own gcc compiler (for C code) and ld linker. If you've installed Cygwin, you've probably also installed the MinGW toolchain, which comes with ...


2

GHCi runs in the IO monad (I think) so you have to use the let keyword like that in order for it to understand what you mean. And why don't you just write the code to a file called 'soma.hs' and then load it into ghci with a: :l soma.hs That should work just as well.



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