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Here's my implementation: XAML: xmlns:Interactivity="using:Microsoft.Xaml.Interactivity" xmlns:behaviors="using:MyNamespace.Behaviors" . . <TextBox x:Name="Searchbox" PlaceholderText="contact's name" Width="250" IsTextPredictionEnabled="False" IsSpellCheckEnabled="False" VerticalAlignment="Center"> ...


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Not sure if this fits your need. If you are not averse to using JS + HTML in WinRT, d3.js should be very very useful Example of packed bubble chart - http://bl.ocks.org/mbostock/4063269 http://d3js.org/ Hope this helps!


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What kind of project are you using? There's actually a way to do this in each kind of supported project. For javascript you can use the Canvas element, which has easy 2D api's for drawing circles and text. In C++ you can use the DirectX 2D api's to draw circles. In C# you can embed a DirectX panel into your xaml and then use DirectX to draw the circles. ...


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There are two techniques to share code in such a scenario: Linked files / shared projects PCL (portable class libraries) See http://www.kenneth-truyers.net/2013/03/27/portable-class-libraries-or-source-code-sharing/ Most probably, XAML code cannot be shared in your scenario because the XAML differs too much between Win7, SL and WinRT.


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The only thing that you can share between those types of application is generic code (view models, business logic, data objects etc.) in a Portable Class Library, and you will be limited to the APIs available to the Portable Class Library. You cannot really share any UI (XAML) code between Win 7 and Win 8 or WinPhone applications.


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After Change the ContenControlComponente to: <ContentControl Grid.Row="2" Grid.ColumnSpan="2" Margin="0,20,0,0" Name="contentControl" Content="{Binding SelectedItem, ElementName=itemListView}" ContentTemplateSelector="{StaticResource MyDataTemplateSelector}" /> it is working.


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Implement INotifyPropertyChanged interface, when the size of your app changes, set the File property value. public PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged; private void NotifyPropertyChanged(string propertyName) { PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = this.PropertyChanged; if (handler != null) { var e = new ...


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What you see in the Mail and many other apps is called a context menu. In Windows Phone 8.1 WinRT apps, there's an easy way to get the context menu by using Flyouts - MenuFlyout to be exact. There's a code sample on MSDN on how to use the Flyouts. In your case, the easiest thing to do is to extend your ListView.ItemTemplate like this: ...


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Remove rootFrame.Navigated += this.RootFrame_FirstNavigated; And replace rootFrame.ContentTransitions = null; by rootFrame.ContentTransitions = new TransitionCollection(); To specify the transition of each Page use: <Page.Transitions> <TransitionCollection> <NavigationThemeTransition /> </TransitionCollection> ...


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They are not defined for store apps. But on the MSDN, you can find guidelines for font usage, and an overview of resources. They did provide complete styles for text, they just didn't split the parts up in separate resources.


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Try, You need to add some changes in your view model for rebind the property after its value changed. Use the below code. public sealed partial class ProductSet : UserControl, INotifyPropertyChanged { private Product product1; private Product product2; private Product product3; public Product Product1 { get { ...


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I'd recommend you to create your own Behavior to handle this. These are the steps for a possible solution. Because you will need to somehow invoke a VisualState in your Behavior's code behind, you have to change the VisualStateManager defined in your xaml to ExtendedVisualStateManager (see the implementation in this post) as the built-in ...


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In SampleBackgroundAudioTask, there is a MyBackgroundAudioTask which is the background audio task used for playing music. There's an object of type SystemMediaTransportControls in that class called systemmediatransportcontrol. SystemMediaTransportControls class enables your app to use the system media transport controls provided by Windows and update the ...


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I've figured. It was a mistake in resource map parameter in GetForCurrentView method. It should be "Resources/Resources", where the 1st Resources is the asssembly name while the 2nd stands for first part of resorce file names.


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You should be using a custom Settings Flyout. A Settings Flyout can be created via Your Project > Add > New Item > Settings Flyout You can find a detailed tutorial here.


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Your behavior should inherit from DependencyObject, try this - public class SelectionBehavior : DependencyObject, IBehavior


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You should read up on the concept of CancellationTokens. That's the idea you're looking for. Lots of examples online. What is "cancellationToken" in the TaskFactory.StartNew() used for? http://dotnetcodr.com/2014/01/31/suspending-a-task-using-a-cancellationtoken-in-net-c/ CancellationToken/CancellationTokenSource is C#'s way of managing and ...


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I have a blog post on how you can get tilt for "normal" items. What are you are trying to do can be achieved, but there is a problem in which the animation is still active. You need to stop the animation before playing it. private void staryrynek1(object sender, PointerRoutedEventArgs e) { pointerDownStoryboard.Stop(); pointerDownStoryboard.Begin(); ...


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Since I haven't done windows store app programming, this may not answer your question, but the message.body.rich object does contain the formatted html (with various tags etc.), which can be rendered directly by any browser.


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Best way to get this going is to check if your app get's focus again ( or is resumed ). With the new wp RT this has changed a bit against wp SL. A bit to long to explain here in StackO answer, but a very compleet explanation is up here http://www.interact-sw.co.uk/iangblog/2013/07/24/return-xaml-store-app Some disscussion about it was up on twitter few days ...


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I think that the problem is, because you aren't providing the correct path. Your file is in project MyPlaylistManager. Try to use: XDocument xdoc = XDocument.Load("ms-appx:///MyPlaylistManager/Quran.xml"); // or like this: StorageFile file = await Windows.ApplicationModel.Package.Current.InstalledLocation.GetFileAsync(@"MyPlaylistManager\Quran.xml"); Also ...


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This started working, as is, and I unfornattely don't know why. I'm doing it on a different computer, so it may have something to do with that specific computer.


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I did not test with a PathIcon, but you can just a Path just fine: <CommandBar> <AppBarToggleButton Label="HQ"> <Path VerticalAlignment="Center" HorizontalAlignment="Center" Fill="White" Stroke="White" Data="M21.0007,6.25 C6.3752,1.125 5.25043,16.6091 5.62518,19.5 C5.9215,21.7858 6.25018,10.75 ...


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Try, this.appBarButton.Icon = new PathIcon(){ Data = PathMarkupToGeometry(Your xaml data string)}; in this case: xaml data string is F1 M 20,20L 24,10L 24,24L 5,24 Geometry PathMarkupToGeometry(string pathMarkup) { string xaml = "<Path " + "xmlns='http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation'>" + ...


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Wrap the control in a ScrollViewer For example: <Page xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" WindowTitle="ScrollViewer Sample"> <ScrollViewer HorizontalScrollBarVisibility="Auto"> <StackPanel VerticalAlignment="Top" ...


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I have the same issue and I found a workaround. I find performances are pretty poor, even without the workaround. It takes about 1s to load completely on my device (Lumia 920). I believe the responsible is the ItemsStackPanel, which is the default ItemsPanel for the ListView. When I use another panel the issue does not occurs. However the scrollviewer ...


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One way to get rid of the weird animation bug is to let the Flyout control's animation run first, and then after the animation finishes, show the ListView. To do this, you need to subscribe to the following events in the Flyout control. Also you need to give the ListView a name and set its Opacity to 0 to start with. <Flyout Opened="Flyout_Opened" ...


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Replace your StackPanel with this <Grid Grid.Column="1" Margin="14.5,0,0,0"> <Grid.ColumnDefinitions> <ColumnDefinition Width="*"/> <ColumnDefinition Width="*"/> </Grid.ColumnDefinitions> <TextBlock Grid.Column="0" Text="{Binding Title}" Style="{ThemeResource ListViewItemTextBlockStyle}"/> ...


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Okkkkk!!! It was my fault. In my code i registered the background task on each app launch without checking if it is already registered. So i used code as below to check if my task is registered then no need to register it again. var taskRegistered = false; var exampleTaskName = "ExampleBackgroundTask"; foreach (var task in ...


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Just create a UserControl with a PushPin Icon and a Grid above it with a simple TextBox inside. Make the Grid invisible by default, and make it Visible once the user click on the pushpin to show all the data that you want. <Grid> <Ellipse Fill="#FFF4F4F5" HorizontalAlignment="Center" Height="50" ...


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thanks to edward.ho.tpe's answer I wrote myself a little EditableComboBox by using an TextBox inside a ComboBoxItem. If you want to use it multiple times it might be better to create a UserControl. However this is how I did it: The style: <SolidColorBrush x:Key="TransparentBrush" Color="Transparent"/> <Style x:Key="ComboBoxItemTextBox" ...


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Looks like it may not be possible without some serious hacks. What's happening is that whenever there is "a touch event that causes the FlipView to animate ", the thing that is causing that animation is the ScrollViewer built into the FlipView, used for flipping. The scrollviewer takes away pointer input until the panning has completed and it cannot be ...


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I've had luck overwriting the template in the style. <Style x:Key="State1Style" TargetType="localControls:FieldControl"> <Setter Property="Background" Value="DarkSlateBlue"></Setter> <Setter Property="Foreground" Value="Cyan"></Setter> <Setter Property="Template"> <Setter.Value> ...


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targetType parameter defines a type, in which value is being converted to. If you want to get the type of enumeration, you have to use value.GetType: public object Convert(object value, System.Type targetType, object parameter, string language) { return Enum.GetName(value.GetType(), value); } but there's an easy way: public object Convert(object ...


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You can try clearing the contents of the following folders under your Windows user profile: AppData\Local\Microsoft\VisualStudio\12.0\Designer\ShadowCache AppData\Local\Microsoft\VisualStudio\12.0\Blend\ShadowCache You do need to have all instances of Visual Studio 2013 and Blend for Visual Studio 2013 closed before deleting the contents of those two ...


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XAML doesn't call your Setter method, as is pointed out at MSDN: The WPF XAML processor uses property system methods for dependency properties when loading binary XAML and processing attributes that are dependency properties. This effectively bypasses the property wrappers. When you implement custom dependency properties, you must account for ...


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Your structure is all OK. The problem that it doesn't work is because of this line. TargetObject="{Binding ElementName=Flyout}" As soon as you have this in the GoToStateAction, it actually goes into this Flyout element (i.e. a Border) and tries to find a VisualState called ShowFlyout/HideFlyout. Of course it won't find it as these states are declared ...


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Here's a simple way: public void Update(GridView gridView) { if (!(gridView.ItemsPanelRoot is VariableSizedWrapGrid)) throw new ArgumentException("ItemsPanel is not VariableSizedWrapGrid"); foreach (var container in gridView.ItemsPanelRoot.Children.Cast<GridViewItem>()) { var data = container.Content as Common.ModelBase; ...


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This is how you do it: <Page.Resources> <DataTemplate x:Key="TestTemplate"> <TextBlock xmlns:Models="using:App17.Models" Text="{Binding Name}" d:DataContext="{d:DesignInstance Type=Models:ColorInfo}" /> </DataTemplate> </Page.Resources> Best of luck!


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If your dictionary is inside Page.Resources then your page is in scope and you can reference elements on the page. If you remove it to a separate file then your page is no longer in scope. Think of this like a private field in a C# class. It is available to anything inside the class. But other classes don't even know it is there, and cannot use it. Same ...


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It doesn't work, because "text" TextBox is in different visual tree than button, so button doesn't know about "text". Such binding is impossible directly, but there exists solution.


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I'd suggest this layout: <Grid> <Grid.RowDefinitions> <RowDefinition /> <RowDefinition Height="Auto" /> </Grid.RowDefinitions> <ScrollViewer> <!-- SOME CONTENT --> </ScrollViewer> <Button Grid.Row="1" Content="Add" /> </Grid> You don't seem to need the ...


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This looks like a good scenario to use a DockPanel. You can set alignment of all child elements of a DockPanel, for example, so that the button is always at the bottom. I like to use DockPanel because it ensures that the Button will always have the same height, as opposed to 1/16th of window's height. LastChildFill property, which is True by default, ...


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Solved it. I added the following Style to the Page.Resources and in the VisualState StoryBoard I changed the Style of the GridView to this style. <Style TargetType="GridView" x:Key="HorizontalItemsPanelStyle"> <Setter Property="ItemsPanel"> <Setter.Value> <ItemsPanelTemplate> <WrapGrid ...


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There is not need to use converter for this case. As now in windows phone 8.1 universal app image different images for different resolution is handled by the OS. and also OS will download only the required resolution image on the device(instead of all images) What you have to is to name images differently... see this post


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I think the main problem is not the converter, maybe your Binding is not properly set, because I see that you are not binding to a property path (although it's not mandatory). If you are not familiar with the Binding markup extension, you can check Binding markup extension or Data binding overview. Also, you might try something like: <Image ...


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This worked for me with no problems. public static class StaticClass { public static ObservableCollection<string> StaticStrings = new ObservableCollection<string>(); } private void ComboBox_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) { StaticClass.StaticStrings.Add("static" + ...


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I found another workaround. Just set the selection Background when the RichEditBox is unfocused. But Jerry's Post gave me the Inspiration to this solution. Seems like this way was to simple to find it a first place: private void RichEditOnGotFocus(object sender, RoutedEventArgs routedEventArgs) { ITextSelection selectedText = ...


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You can "override" the hardware back button's behavior BackPressed event for what you want in this case. Well this code will only work in Windows Phone, because there is no hardware back button in Windows 8 systems( since you added the Windows-runtime tag ). private void HardwareButtons_BackPressed(object sender, BackPressedEventArgs e) { e.Cancel = ...


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The Behavior and the VisualState need to both be under the root element.



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