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If you look at winsock.h more closely, you will see that SOCKET is not a pointer, it is an integer: typedef UINT_PTR SOCKET; UINT_PTR is not a pointer to a UINT (PUINT and LPUINT are). It is a UINT that is the same size as a pointer. So UINT_PTR is 4 bytes in a 32bit process and is 8 bytes in a 64bit process. See MSDN's documentation for more details on ...


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You have quite a few questions bundled in one. I think the most important one to answer for you is that when you call receive on a TCP socket, it will not magically handle receiving a whole message for you. In fact if you think about it, the only thing that is guaranteed is that you will receive data on an 8 bit-boundary. A call to receive will block until ...


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Warning: I've not compiled this. But it should give you the idea. Basically you just make your C style array and append the data from each string into it: std::vector<wchar_t> cArray; // Optional: Calculate the length of the desired byte array in advance std::size_t actualSize = 1 + strings.size(); // stringLengths + number of strings + 1 for ...


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Unlike TCP, UDP is connection-less, and as such you don't need to create separate sockets for each party. One UDP socket can handle everything. Bind it to a local IP/Port and call WSARecvFrom() once, and when it reports data to your IOCP you can process the data as needed (if another thread if needed) and then call WSARecvFrom() again. Each time new data ...


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I want it to put the filenames in the directory in to char temp[] That is not going to work: a character array is a single string; you need an array of strings. That is, you need an array of pointers. There are several ways of making it work. One is to let the caller pass an array, along with its length to avoid overruns, and then allocate strings ...



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