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4

Use reinterpret_cast to cast from BYTE* to char*. A BYTE is an unsigned char typedef, so you shouldn't have any issues. char* foo = reinterpret_cast<char*>(bar); Where bar is your BYTE*.


4

You have an example in Beej's Guide to Network Programming: 7.3. Handling Partial send()s Remember back in the section about send(), above, when I said that send() might not send all the bytes you asked it to? That is, you want it to send 512 bytes, but it returns 412. What happened to the remaining 100 bytes? Well, they're still in your ...


4

If you're sending or receiving UDP packets, then there is no way around it; you'll need a buffer big enough to hold the entire packet. Fortunately, in most cases you don't want to send or receive UDP packets bigger than around 1500 bytes anyway, (since that is the largest packet an Ethernet card can send without fragmenting it into smaller packets, and ...


3

You need buffering on both ends. When you send something, you are not assured that all your buffer would be sent. The send(2) syscall may return a partial byte count. Likewise, when your recv something, the byte stream may be partial. The recv(2) syscall may return a partial byte count. You probably need some event loop (e.g. above poll(2)) to mix both ...


3

Simple typo: if (t = SOCKET_ERROR) should be: if (t == SOCKET_ERROR)


3

Since recv might not receive as many bytes as you told it, you typically use a function like this to receive specified number of bytes. Modified from here int receiveall(int s, char *buf, int *len) { int total = 0; // how many bytes we've received int bytesleft = *len; // how many we have left to receive int n; while(total < *len) ...


2

Your client is probably not sending anything until you hit enter, due to line buffering -- stdio usually buffers the input until it sees a newline (this allows you to, among other things, edit the line you're writing before sending it). If you have any control over the client, you may be able to put the console in a "raw" mode, which sends keys as soon as ...


2

The result tells you how many bytes were received. recv doesn't add a terminator since, in general, network data is binary data which might not be usable as a C-style string. You can add a terminator yourself, if you know the message won't contain the termination character: buffer[result] = 0; // make sure the buffer is large enough or make a string (or ...


2

BYTE b[40]; const char *p = reinterpret_cast<const char*>(b);


2

Send the message piece by piece. You can only send pieces as large as the send buffer size, so you need to remember how much you have sent and how much remains; then you can use a loop to do what is required: int bufferSize = 200; int messageLength = 442; // or whatever int sendPosition = 0; while (messageLength) { int chunkSize = messageLength > ...


1

Is very difficult to help you without a console... but you can talk with your friend and try this: From your friend's PC, make a ping against your server. If you recieve an answer, use tracert or traceroute to find out what's the problem What's the route model of your friend? probably it has a System Event Log where you can check for rejected connections. ...


1

For TCP, you don't have to do a thing. Just initiate the connection from the PC. The router will know the responses has to be routed back to the PC. UDP is tricky you as you need router support. Applications typically use NAT-PMP to achieve this. The wikipedia entry mentions both uTorrent and Skype. If you want to see how they do it listen on UDP port 5351. ...


1

Don't create a compatible bitmap. Create a DIB section: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/dd183494%28v=vs.85%29.aspx BITMAPINFO bi; ZeroMemory(&bi,sizeof(BITMAPINFO)); bi.bmiHeader.biSize=sizeof(BITMAPINFOHEADER); bi.bmiHeader.biWidth=Width; bi.bmiHeader.biHeight=Height; bi.bmiHeader.biPlanes=1; bi.bmiHeader.biBitCount=32; char* ...


1

int result = recv(socket, messageString, strlen(messageString), 0); should instead read int result = recv(socket, messageString, sizeof(messageString), 0); Also try printing the values of each byte of message right before socketOutputStream.write(message); to make sure that you aren't transmitting the null, ACK



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