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3

If your string is actually shorter than 14 characters (+1 for null terminator), you cause undefined behaviour by memcpying 15 characters. There is no difference at all between the first two code example; if the program appears to behave different then your program has already caused undefined behaviour earlier, and you are now seeing follow-on effects from ...


3

By default, a socket will be 'blocking', meaning that certain calls (like connect) will block the execution of your program until the operation has been completed. On MS-Windows, you can change the socket to 'non-blocking' using a call to ioctlsocket. For a non-blocking socket, the connect call will return immediately and you'll have to use select to find ...


3

Firstly, TCP_NODELAY was not the right way to do this... TCP is a byte stream protocol and any given connection only maintains the byte ordering - not necessarily the boundaries of any given send/write. It's inherently broken to rely on multiple threads that don't use any synchronisation being able to even keep the messages they want to send together on the ...


2

When the server sends the client name, it is sending the length as the length of the string + 1 to include the terminating NULL character. However, the value returned by std::string::length() does NOT include the terminating NULL, so the server is not actually sending the terminating NULL to the client. When the client then reads the name, it reads the ...


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if I use inet_addr(str.c_str()); I will get the wrong output,while if I use a const char * temp before it , ... I can get the right output Passing str.c_str() directly to inet_addr() works just fine, so the ONLY way it would fail is if the str does not contain a valid IP address to begin with. For instance, since you are getting the value from the ...


2

Who (what documentation page) gave you permission to change readfds while select is using it? When you pass a data structure to an API function, that function owns it until it returns (or longer, in the case of buffers for overlapped I/O). You can't go overwriting it from another thread. You need to combine your main select loop and your "master" thread, ...


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1) Use INADDR_ANY 2) Use ::bind instead of bind. The name is ambiguous to an standard template library call. This is why using namespace std is bad. void MasterThread(queue<char*>* tasks) { WSAData WinSockData; WORD Version = MAKEWORD(2, 1); WSAStartup(Version, &WinSockData); /* Create socket structure */ SOCKADDR_IN ...


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Whey! I'm two years late to the party. But I've an answer for you & others in the same boat :D It's not a bug in Eclipse, it's a bug in MinGW - right before freeaddrinfo/getaddrinfo/getnameinfo, the latest version of mingw's headers states: #if (_WIN32_WINNT >= _WIN32_WINNT_WINXP) /** * For WIN2K the user includes wspiapi.h for these functions. ...


1

When select() returns -1 (SOCKET_ERROR), use WSAGetLastError() to find out why it failed. If the socket is in the Err set when select() exits, use getsockopt(SOL_SOCKET, SO_ERROR) to retrieve the socket error code that tells you why connect() failed. if(iResult) evaluates as true for any non-zero value, including -1. You need to use if(iResult > 0) ...


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You could try using the XMLHTTP60 object from MSXML2 v6.0 (or equivalent from earlier versions). This is designed to be a client-side object and should discover the proxy settings for itself. Add a reference to "Microsoft XML, v6.0" and then it's as simple as: Dim xhrRequest As XMLHTTP60 Set xhrRequest = New XMLHTTP60 xhrRequest.Open "GET", "<URL goes ...


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If your single thread is also implementing a GUI then WSAAsyncSelect is designed for this purpose: You get your socket notifications through messages in the Windows queue that your GUI thread must service anyway. If your single thread is dedicated to the sockets and does not need a message loop, then WSAEventSelect might be more convenient, and a little ...


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To summarize, you need: A handful of clients (50) Few messages sent (connection status every 5s) Shared state (list of all clients to each) This sounds like a clear case for not using threads. They'll cause synchronization headaches to handle that common state, and all the communication needs to go through the same network stack anyhow. You'll also want ...


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With few clients synchronous thread-based IO is usually the easiest (most productive) choice. With many clients you can save a ton of memory and scheduling overhead by using async IO. With 50 clients you are on the verge between the two cases. I'd go synchronous and just reduce the stack size of my worker threads a bit. But even if you have to live with the ...


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Your problem is that you are using strlen() to find the length of the message. strlen() just looks for the first zero-valued byte and assumes that's the end. This is the convention for text strings, but does not apply to binary messages like Protocol Buffers. In this case, strlen() is returning a size that is too short and so some fields are missing from the ...



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