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3

int bytesRead, iRecv; char recvBuffer[MAX_BUFFER]; bytesRead = 0; do { iRecv = recv(m_socket, recvBuffer + bytesRead, MAX_BUFFER - bytesRead, 0); if ( iRecv > 0 ) bytesRead += iRecv; } while ((iRecv > 0) && (bytesRead < MAX_BUFFER)); When the do loop completes: bytesRead holds the number of bytes read and the data is in ...


2

Lets consider the following lines, take from your shown source: iResult = recv(ClientSocket, recvbuf, recvbuflen, 0); ... else if (iResult == 0){ printf("Connection closing...\n"); closesocket(ClientSocket);} ... iResult = shutdown(ClientSocket, SD_SEND); When recv returns zero that means the connection has been closed (nicely) by the other end. ...


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ok, let's be reasonable and get rid of that ridiculously huge buffer. char buffer[4096]; int nDataLength; std::string result; while ((nDataLength = recv(Socket, buffer, 4096, 0)) > 0) { std::copy_if(buffer, buffer + nDataLength, std::back_inserter(result), [](char c) { return !std::isspace(c); ...


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Is the pushback used like this?Or what can I do? cppreference.com says "std::thread is not CopyConstructible or CopyAssignable, although it is MoveConstructible and MoveAssignable." Consider: std::vector <std::thread*> thred; and related adjustments. Also, consider using a smart pointer.


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You have a couple of options, there isn't a single trivial solution for this. You will have to design your own protocol that the server and client can agree on with regards to serializing and deserializing to and from the socket stream. One characteristic of your Message that makes this a little tricky is that, when flattened to a character array, it ...


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The code you showed is correct. The error is is the code you do not show. With the 2 classes message and MessageSerializer, I tried that simple test: int main() { message msg = {1, "foo", "2016-04-02 10:40:20" }; MessageSerializer msgSer(msg); size_t sz = msgSer.RequiredBufferSize(); char * buffer = new char[sz]; ...


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The old answer (kept below) is informational but not correct for this case. The problem is most likely these two lines char* hostname=(char *)"tick.usno.navy.mil"; ... server_addr.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr(hostname); // IP address to use The inet_addr function expects a dotted-decimal IPv4 address. Not an unresolved host-name. If not a valid IPv4 ...


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The following offers a simple approach for the serialization problem. However, note that it is not portable. It assumes same environment conditions on both sides (client/server), i.e. endianness and sizeof int and size_t. This assumption is probably unsatisfactory when writing server/client programs, and your code should handle this aspect as well. For ...


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You can use the Boost serialization library to save/load your structure to an array of char. The boost library is widely used in C++, and if you're not familiar with it, I'd recommend taking a look at it. Instead of using winsock, you could learn to use Boost sockets and make your C++ code work on almost any platform, instead of just Windows, but that's ...


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There are 4 fixes needed for your code: the sender needs to take the return value of fread and send that many bytes initially the receiver needs to write msg_len bytes instead of sizeof(buffer) especially if the sending socket is set in non-blocking mode, the send() function may not send all the given data in one call. You need to look at the return value ...


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Concatenate ( join together ) a string variable with a char buffer in your loop like this: myString+=buffer[i]; // myString = myString + buffer[i]; Example code listing: #include <winsock2.h> #include <windows.h> #include <iostream> #include <string> #include <locale> #pragma comment(lib,"ws2_32.lib") using namespace ...



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