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3

I would highly recommend using a library to handle this for you while you get started - a good, lightweight example is Protocol Buffers, a serialization protocol designed by Google. Protocol buffers are a flexible, efficient, automated mechanism for serializing structured data – think XML, but smaller, faster, and simpler. You define how you want ...


3

From the WSASend docs: If the socket is non-blocking and stream-oriented, and there is not sufficient space in the transport's buffer, WSASend will return with only part of the application's buffers having been consumed. Given the same buffer situation and a blocking socket, WSASend will block until all of the application buffer contents have been ...


3

receiving_func(void* v) takes 1 argument, but std::thread(&TcpClient::receiving_func); requires a function that takes zero arguments. What do you believe v will be in the function? You could perhaps std::thread(&TcpClient::receiving_func, NULL); to compile (and set v == NULL), or since you're not using v, just remove it from the method signature. ...


3

On the client side: do not call WSACleanup() before calling connect(). You are not doing any error handling on getaddrinfo(). you are not setting the ai_flags to match your input values (like AI_NUMERICHOST). you are not freeing the memory that getaddrinfo() returns. you are not taking into account that you are specifying AF_UNSPEC to getaddrinfo() so it ...


2

if (ConnectSocket = socket(servinfo->ai_family, servinfo->ai_socktype, servinfo->ai_protocol) == INVALID_SOCKET) You´re comparing socket(...) to INVALID_SOCKET and then you´re assigning the result true/false to ConnectSocket. Use if ((ConnectSocket = socket(servinfo->ai_family, servinfo->ai_socktype, servinfo->ai_protocol)) == ...


2

Sockets do not have a thread affinity, so you can freely create a socket in one thread and use it in another thread. You do not need to call WSAStartup() on a per-thread basis. If accept() reports WSANOTINITIALISED then either WSAStartup() really was not called beforehand, or else WSACleanup() was called prematurely.


2

When the socket is not available on the target system, it may send back an ICMP message indicating that the socket is not open and attempt to connect was failed. In this case, winsock funcitons will return immediately - it's by design.


1

The major problem here is that you use an array of characters (even if it's just an array of a single character), which the output operator interprets as a string. And as you should know, all strings needs to be terminated by the special character '\0', which can be anywhere in memory after the character you read. Instead you should use a single char ...


1

As long as you have not disabled the network stack's buffering (using SO_RCVBUF and setting the buffer size to 0) then you will have some buffer space within the networking stack and this will be used if you don't have a WSARecv() pending. If you are using TCP then you don't even have to worry when you fill this buffer space as that will cause a Zero Window ...


1

Use WSAGetLastError to find out why the call has failed. connect returns 0 on success or SOCKET_ERROR on failure. You commented that WSAGetLastError returns WSAEWOULDBLOCK which states: This error is returned from operations on nonblocking sockets that cannot be completed immediately, for example recv when no data is queued to be read from the socket. ...


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This is so that if anyone wants to build the new version of OpenSSL "1.0.1g" that fixes the Heartbleed problem you can follow the previous steps whit the following changes: I renamed the folder include to --include and create a new folder named include, the VS project will take care of copying the information, --include if you like you can remove this, ...


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WSAIoctl passed FIONREAD is documented this way: If the socket passed in the s parameter is message oriented (for example, type SOCK_DGRAM), FIONREAD returns the reports the total number of bytes available to read, not the size of the first datagram (message) queued on the socket. I think this answers your first question. As for the second, I ...


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Two things: I don't think the IP address of your server can be 0.0.0.0, but instead 10.0.0.2; and also, UDP doesn't support the concept of 'accept'. There are just packets, and you can either bind a socket to a port, then receive packets from a specific IP (with recvfrom), or you can receive packets from anyone, with recv. The latter will be useful in case ...



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