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5

If you want to enumerate the local machine's current available IP addresses, use GetAdaptersInfo() or GetAdaptersAddresses(). If you want to enumerate the local machine's current active TCP/IP socket connections, use GetTcpTable() or GetTcpTable2() for IPv4 connections, and GetTcp6Table() or GetTcp6Table2() for IPv6 connections.


3

With each round of your while-loop you're doing two ill-advised activites: Passing the address of an automatic variable that will be destroyed with each cycle of the loop. Leaking a thread HANDLE returned from _beginthreadex Neither of those is good. Ideally your thread proc should look something like this: unsigned __stdcall ClientSession(void *data) ...


3

I don't have a documentation reference that confirms this is possible but I've been doing it for years and it hasn't failed yet, YMMV. You CAN use a single data buffer as long as you have a unique OVERLAPPED structure per send. Since the WSABUF array is duplicated by the WSASend() call and can be stack based I would expect that you COULD have a single ...


3

Given that a single TCP connection with large windows or small RTT can saturate any network link, I don't see what benefit you expect from multiple TCP sessions. Each new piece will begin with slow-start and so have a lower transfer-rate than an established connection would have. TCP already has code for high-throughput, high-latency connections ("window ...


3

You can shutdown() the socket for input. The recv() will unblock and return zero and everybody will be happy.


2

I always thought that you could answer this question by looking at the MSDN docs for socket() and WSASocket() and, specifically that you couldn't create a socket that can be used with overlapped I/O (and IOCPs) using socket() as only WSASocket() allows you to specify the WSA_FLAG_OVERLAPPED flag when you create the socket. But that's incorrect as socket() ...


2

A completion will be queued to the IOCP associated with a socket only if an API call that can generate completions is called in a way that requests a completion to be queued. So you will know which API calls can generate completions by the fact that you've read the documentation and you're passing an OVERLAPPED structure to them. Thus you don't really need ...


1

UDP does not usualy drops packet on same machine. Instead of using rand() function approach you can do another trick. Send large packets from the sender and receive in smaller chunks in the receiver code. And use sleep function after every receive. So one the pipe gets full, you may notice packet drops


1

RST packets are not ACKed, so there is no 'guarantee' in the sense you mean. However if you keep sending to an endpoint which has reset the connection, it will keep issuing RST packets.


1

1) exit() is a problem for every RAII thing, not just sockets. Open files, memory... The proper solution is to avoid exit(). 2+3) Call as many WSACleanup as WSAStartup. I guess you want to write a socket class with one connection per object, just call WSAStartup in the constructor and WSACleanup in the destructor. Both methods are using a call counter ...


1

Here is an example I tested on on linux. I dont have access to a Windows system until tomorrow, but can test and update the answer if required. It is comparable to the Windows version only without the WSAStartup call at the beginning. #include <unistd.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <errno.h> #include <netdb.h> int main() { char ...


1

You're missing the point. What causes completion packets to be sent is events, not API calls. There are basically only a few TCP events: inbound connection outbound connection complete data write finished timeout end of stream, and error.


1

if the client sends more than one byte, server will read the first byte and call close with data in its receive queue,causing a RST to be sent to the client. The client will be blocked on a call to recv( ) waiting the response from the server. Upon receiving the RST, DieWithError( ) reports the problem Connection reset by peer. So shutdown can be used ...


1

Server or client? In the server, if the requested port is already taken, you log an error and stop. This is why ports are often stored in configuration. For the client, if you cannot connect to the specified port, you log an error too. Its not much different from not being able to connect to any other network resource, like a URL in your browser.


1

TCP sockets work on a byte stream concept. The TCP socket ensures your data arrives without error and in order as a byte stream. The sender adds bytes to the TCP byte stream, and the socket takes care of sending them to the destination. The socket does not separate your logical messages; it is your responsibility to insert separators for any logical messages ...



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