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103

Once I've found this somewhere. It worked for me. "For alpha sort, select the lines to be sorted and hit F5. This option ignores capitalization. Hitting Control F5 will sort lines starting with capital letters first, then alphabetize lines starting with lowercase letters." "The Permute Lines menu options provide a few more ways to sort, including Reverse, ...


38

WordNet database might be helpful. I once worked on a Firefox add-on which deals with words and all kinds of simple to complicated associations between them and stuff. Looks like WordNet will be very much useful to you. Here it is in MySQL format. And this one uses Wordnet v3.0 data, rather than the older Wordnet 2.0 data:


36

For those that find this question and have no luck with Rashad's F5 answer, on my copy of Sublime Text 3 the default shortcut to "Sort Lines" is F9 and to "Sort Lines (Case Sensitive)" is Ctrl + F9. See the Edit menu. I know this doesn't directly answer the question, but I'm hoping that it saves a couple people a few minutes.


32

String.split() will do most of what you want. You may then need to loop over the words to pull out any punctuation. For example: String s = "This is a sample sentence."; String[] words = s.split("\\s+"); for (int i = 0; i < words.length; i++) { // You may want to check for a non-word character before blindly // performing a replacement // It ...


31

Try this: import re mystr = 'This is a string, with words!' wordList = re.sub("[^\w]", " ", mystr).split() How it works : From the docs : re.sub(pattern, repl, string, count=0, flags=0) Return the string obtained by replacing the leftmost non-overlapping occurrences of pattern in string by the replacement repl. If the pattern isn’t found, string is ...


31

Not a bad start! The only thing to remember is that pure function application should use let instead of the binding <-. import System.IO import Control.Monad main = do let list = [] handle <- openFile "test.txt" ReadMode contents <- hGetContents handle let singlewords = words contents list = f ...


30

Use the NumberFormatter class that are in php ;) $f = new NumberFormatter("en", NumberFormatter::SPELLOUT); echo $f->format(1432); That would output "one thousand four hundred thirty-two"


24

i used word-wrap: break-word; word-break: break-all; table-layout: fixed; the table-layout: fixed was the key to making it work


19

I think this is the simplest way for anyone else stumbling on this post given the late response: >>> string = 'This is a string, with words!' >>> string.split() ['This', 'is', 'a', 'string,', 'with', 'words!']


16

You can find what you need on infochimps.org. They have a list of 350,000 simple (ie non-compound) words available for free download. Word List - 350,000+ Simple English Words Regarding other languages, you might want to poke around on Wiktionary. Here is a link to all the database backups - the information isnt organized so likely but if they have a ...


16

To do this properly is quite complex. For your research, it is known as word tokenization. You should look at NLTK if you want to see what others have done, rather than starting from scratch: >>> import nltk >>> paragraph = u"Hi, this is my first sentence. And this is my second." >>> sentences = nltk.sent_tokenize(paragraph) >&...


15

Use TRIE data structure for this. You should need some memory for constructing the data structure. But your objective will be most efficient.


15

It's not totally clear what the context is here: you could be talking about text in a line in a buffer or about a string stored in a VimScript variable. note: Different interpretations of the question led to various approaches and solutions. There are some "old updates" that start about halfway through that have been rendered more or less obsolete by a ...


15

A regex solution. (\b[^\s]+\b) And if you really want to fix that last . on i.e. you could use this. ((\b[^\s]+\b)((?<=\.\w).)?) Here's the code I'm using. var input = "The moon is our natural satellite, i.e. it rotates around the Earth!"; var matches = Regex.Matches(input, @"((\b[^\s]+\b)((?<=\.\w).)?)"); foreach(var match in matches) {...


15

Here's what worked for me with a similar list of strings in Notepad++ without any macros or anything else: Click Edit -> Blank Operations -> EOL to space [All the items should now be in a single line separated by a 'space'] Select any 'space' and do a Replace All (by ',')


15

you could use Split(char c) that will give you back an array of sub strings seperated by the ~ symbol. string src = "A~B~C~D"; string [] splits = src.Split('~'); obviously though, unless you know the length of your string/words in advance you won't be able to arbitrarily put them in their own variables. but if you knew it was always 4 words, you could ...


14

Put your words in std::set<std::string> containers and do a lookup on them. This gives O(log n) time for an access, which is probably sufficient for what you are doing. You can also use std::map<std::string, std::string> where the key is the word and the value is the class (e.g. "noun").


14

fapDaddy's answer using a macro pointed me in the right direction. Here's precisely what worked for me. Place the cursor after the first data item. Click 'Macro > Start Recording' in the menu. Type this sequence: Comma, Space, Delete, End. Click 'Macro > Stop recording' in the menu. Click 'Macro > Run a Macro Multiple Times...' in the menu. Click '...


13

It is slow because you are re-reading a file for each loop iteration, and create a new function object. Neither of these two things are dependent on the loop variable; move these out of the loop to only run once. Furthermore, the simple function can be inlined; calling a function is relatively expensive. And don't call ''.join() twice, either. And you are ...


12

word-break: break-word; This is what you want


11

What you are trying to do is get all the permutations of a collection. Unique permutations of list permutations of k objects from a set of n algorithm Here is the code snippet: static void Main(string[] args) { var list = new List<string> { "a", "b", "c", "d", "e" }; var result = GetPermutations(list, 3); foreach (var perm in result) ...


11

Yes, http://www.karlrixon.co.uk/writing/convert-numbers-to-words-with-php/


11

What you need is word-wrap: break-word;, this property will force the non spaced string to break inside the div Demo div { width: 20px; word-wrap: break-word; }


10

WordNet is a lexicon rather than an ontology, so 'levels' don't really apply. There is SUMO, which is an upper ontology which relates to WordNet if you want a directed lattice instead of a network. For some domains, SUMO's mid-level ontology is probably where you want to look, but I'm not sure it has 'mexican wrapped food', as most of its topics are ...


10

Do you need actual English words, or just random strings that only contain letters a-z? If you need actual English words, the only way to do it is to use a dictionary, and select words from it at random. If you don't need English words, then something like this will do: public static String[] generateRandomWords(int numberOfWords) { String[] ...


10

Use the string.split() method to split the string on the " " character and then return the nth-1 element of the array (this example doesn't include any bounds checking so be careful): var getNthWord = function(string, n){ var words = string.split(" "); return words[n-1]; }


10

You cannot solve this with a simple comparator and a sort, because the comparison does not define a total order. A total order is one in which the following four properties hold: Reflexivity: x ≤ x is always true. Antisymmetry: If x ≤ y and x ≠ y, then y ≤ x is never true. Transitivity: If x ≤ y and y ≤ z, then x ≤ z Totality: For any ...


9

Using str_replace... A simple approach is to use str_replace or str_ireplace, which can take an array of 'needles' (things to search for), corresponding replacements, and an array of 'haystacks' (things to operate on). $haystacks=array( "The quick brown fox", "jumps over the ", "lazy dog" ); $needles=array( "the", "lazy", "quick" ); $result=...


9

I think this solution will help you! pre { white-space: pre; /* CSS 2.0 */ white-space: pre-wrap; /* CSS 2.1 */ white-space: pre-line; /* CSS 3.0 */ white-space: -pre-wrap; /* Opera 4-6 */ white-space: -o-pre-wrap; /* Opera 7 */ white-space: -moz-pre-wrap; /* Mozilla */ white-space: -hp-pre-wrap; /* HP ...



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