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18

WordNet database might be helpful. I once worked on a Firefox add-on which deals with words and all kinds of simple to complicated associations between them and stuff. Looks like WordNet will be very much useful to you. MySQL format - http://androidtech.com/html/wordnet-mysql-20.php This one uses Wordnet v3.0 data, rather than the older Wordnet 2.0 data: ...


17

Not a bad start! The only thing to remember is that pure function application should use let instead of the binding <-. import System.IO import Control.Monad main = do let list = [] handle <- openFile "test.txt" ReadMode contents <- hGetContents handle let singlewords = words contents list = f ...


17

i used word-wrap: break-word; word-break: break-all; table-layout: fixed; the table-layout: fixed was the key to making it work


16

String.split() will do most of what you want. You may then need to loop over the words to pull out any punctuation. For example: String s = "This is a sample sentence."; String[] words = s.split("\\s+"); for (int i = 0; i < words.length; i++) { // You may want to check for a non-word character before blindly // performing a replacement // It ...


15

Use TRIE data structure for this. You should need some memory for constructing the data structure. But your objective will be most efficient.


14

Put your words in std::set<std::string> containers and do a lookup on them. This gives O(log n) time for an access, which is probably sufficient for what you are doing. You can also use std::map<std::string, std::string> where the key is the word and the value is the class (e.g. "noun").


14

you could use Split(char c) that will give you back an array of sub strings seperated by the ~ symbol. string src = "A~B~C~D"; string [] splits = src.Split('~'); obviously though, unless you know the length of your string/words in advance you won't be able to arbitrarily put them in their own variables. but if you knew it was always 4 words, you could ...


13

It's not totally clear what the context is here: you could be talking about text in a line in a buffer or about a string stored in a VimScript variable. note: Different interpretations of the question led to various approaches and solutions. There are some "old updates" that start about halfway through that have been rendered more or less obsolete by a ...


13

It is slow because you are re-reading a file for each loop iteration, and create a new function object. Neither of these two things are dependent on the loop variable; move these out of the loop to only run once. Furthermore, the simple function can be inlined; calling a function is relatively expensive. And don't call ''.join() twice, either. And you are ...


12

Try this: import re mystr = 'This is a string, with words!' wordList = re.sub("[^\w]", " ", mystr).split() How it works : From the docs : re.sub(pattern, repl, string, count=0, flags=0) Return the string obtained by replacing the leftmost non-overlapping occurrences of pattern in string by the replacement repl. If the pattern isn’t found, string is ...


11

Once I've found this somewhere. It worked for me. "For alpha sort, select the lines to be sorted and hit F5. This option ignores capitalization. Hitting Control F5 will sort lines starting with capital letters first, then alphabetize lines starting with lowercase letters." "The Permute Lines menu options provide a few more ways to sort, including Reverse, ...


10

You cannot solve this with a simple comparator and a sort, because the comparison does not define a total order. A total order is one in which the following four properties hold: Reflexivity: x ≤ x is always true. Antisymmetry: If x ≤ y and x ≠ y, then y ≤ x is never true. Transitivity: If x ≤ y and y ≤ z, then x ≤ z Totality: For any ...


9

Using str_replace... A simple approach is to use str_replace or str_ireplace, which can take an array of 'needles' (things to search for), corresponding replacements, and an array of 'haystacks' (things to operate on). $haystacks=array( "The quick brown fox", "jumps over the ", "lazy dog" ); $needles=array( "the", "lazy", "quick" ); ...


9

Do you need actual English words, or just random strings that only contain letters a-z? If you need actual English words, the only way to do it is to use a dictionary, and select words from it at random. If you don't need English words, then something like this will do: public static String[] generateRandomWords(int numberOfWords) { String[] ...


9

Use the string.split() method to split the string on the " " character and then return the nth-1 element of the array (this example doesn't include any bounds checking so be careful): var getNthWord = function(string, n){ var words = string.split(" "); return words[n-1]; }


9

word-break: break-word; This is what you want


9

For those that find this question and have no luck with Rashad's F5 answer, on my copy of Sublime Text 3 the default shortcut to "Sort Lines" is F9 and to "Sort Lines (Case Sensitive)" is Ctrl + F9. See the Edit menu. I know this doesn't directly answer the question, but I'm hoping that it saves a couple people a few minutes.


8

You can find what you need on infochimps.org. They have a list of 350,000 simple (ie non-compound) words available for free download. Word List - 350,000+ Simple English Words Regarding other languages, you might want to poke around on Wiktionary. Here is a link to all the database backups - the information isnt organized so likely but if they have a ...


8

To do this properly is quite complex. For your research, it is known as word tokenization. You should look at NLTK if you want to see what others have done, rather than starting from scratch: >>> import nltk >>> paragraph = u"Hi, this is my first sentence. And this is my second." >>> sentences = nltk.sent_tokenize(paragraph) ...


8

I think this solution will help you! pre { white-space: pre; /* CSS 2.0 */ white-space: pre-wrap; /* CSS 2.1 */ white-space: pre-line; /* CSS 3.0 */ white-space: -pre-wrap; /* Opera 4-6 */ white-space: -o-pre-wrap; /* Opera 7 */ white-space: -moz-pre-wrap; /* Mozilla */ white-space: -hp-pre-wrap; /* HP ...


7

WordNet is a lexicon rather than an ontology, so 'levels' don't really apply. There is SUMO, which is an upper ontology which relates to WordNet if you want a directed lattice instead of a network. For some domains, SUMO's mid-level ontology is probably where you want to look, but I'm not sure it has 'mexican wrapped food', as most of its topics are ...


7

To just find the substring, you can use contains or indexOf or any other variant: http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/docs/api/java/lang/String.html if( s.contains( word ) ) { // ... } if( s.indexOf( word2 ) >=0 ) { // ... } If you care about word boundaries, then StringTokenizer is probably a good approach. ...


7

The nltk wordnet corpus provides a programmatic interface to a "large lexical database of English words". You can navigate the word graph based on a variety of relationships. It meets the requirements for showing "definition, part-of-speech, synonyms, antonyms, quotes", and "from a dictionary which is ideally downloadable". Another option would be to ...


7

A regex solution. (\b[^\s]+\b) And if you really want to fix that last . on i.e. you could use this. ((\b[^\s]+\b)((?<=\.\w).)?) Here's the code I'm using. var input = "The moon is our natural satellite, i.e. it rotates around the Earth!"; var matches = Regex.Matches(input, @"((\b[^\s]+\b)((?<=\.\w).)?)"); foreach(var match in matches) ...


7

I suspect the solution you're looking for is much more complex than you think. You're looking for some form of actual language analysis, or at a minimum a dictionary, so that you can determine whether a period is part of a word or ends a sentence. Have you considered the fact that it may do both? Consider adding a dictionary of allowed "words that contain ...


7

The problem is with cin. It stops reading after the first space character is read. See the "cin and strings" section of this tutorial: http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/basic_io/ You can use getline(cin, input); to do what you want.


7

result = subject.replace(/\S*[.*]\S*/g, ""); should do it. Explanation: \S* # match any number of non-whitespace characters [.*] # match either a dot or an asterisk \S* # match any number of non-whitespace characters


7

Yes, http://www.karlrixon.co.uk/writing/convert-numbers-to-words-with-php/


7

split expects a regular expression. Use it's power. str = string.split(" +"); //more sophisticated str = string.split("\\s+"); \s matches any whitespace (not just space, but tabs. newline etc.) + means "one or more of them" The first backslash is needed to escape the second to remove the special meaning inside the string



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