Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

47

In your DoWork event handler for the BackgroundWorker (which is where the background work takes place) there is an argument DoWorkEventArgs. This object has a public property object Result. When your worker has generated its result (in your case, a List<FileInfo>), set e.Result to that, and return. Now that your BackgroundWorker has completed its ...


22

Worker processes are a way of segmenting the execution of your website across multiple exe's. You do this for a couple of reasons, one if one of the workers gets clobbered by run time issues it doesn't take the others down. For example, if a html request comes in that causes the process to run off into nothing then only the other requests that are being ...


15

Having multiple worker processes and using InProc does not seem to be compatible. See this: If you enable Web-garden mode by setting the webGarden attribute to true in the processModel element of the application's Web.config file, do not use InProc session state mode. If you do, data loss can occur if different requests for the same session are served ...


15

When deploying ASP.Net applications I create a new folder on the server and change the home directory of the website within IIS. This provides zero downtime deployment and a quick rollback position in case of unforeseen issues. On a future update I scrap the old version and repeat the process so that there is always a single rollback position. Update - ...


13

a) Because of Overlapped Recycling. There is a time period that the "old" process waits for the new one to start. b) No. As far as I know.


13

IIS Worker Process Recycling is the process whereby IIS kills of the child processes that it spawns to handle incoming requests and starts clean copies of them. The first time IIS gets a request for a web application in a given application pool, it spawns a worker process to actually do the work. This process does things like maintaining the session state ...


12

I'm assuming that you don't want to block and wait on RunWorkerAsync() for the results (if you did, there would be no reason to run async! If you want to be notified when the background process finishes, hook the RunWorkerCompleted Event. If you want to return some state, return it in the Result member of DoWork's event args. EDIT: I posted prematurely -- ...


11

I would check the CLR Tuning Section in the document Gulzar mentioned. As the other posters pointed out, any object that implements IDispose should have Dispose() called on it when it's finished with, preferably using the using construct. Fire up perfmon.exe and add these counters: Process\Private Bytes .NET CLR Memory# Bytes in all Heaps ...


9

One of the main goals of the TPL is to remove the need to worry about this. By decomposing your work into Tasks instead of Threads, you're allowing the scheduler to handle the balancing of this more appropriately. There is no fixed upper limit to the number of "tasks" you can schedule. They are (by default, with the default TaskScheduler) scheduled using ...


8

A recycle if I recall correctly allows all existing requests to finish then it will recycle the application pool. A stop simply ends it at the exact instant that you stop it.


8

I've noticed IIS defaults web apps on a 29-hour recycle schedule, which can be troublesome since it may recycle at times your users do not expect it to. For example: web app starts at 12 am, which means the next day it recycles at 5am, the day after that at 10am, the day after that at 3pm, etc. (this is assuming there is enough request activity against ...


7

ANTS Profiler is very good at profiling ASP.NET applications.


7

When you bring the file data into memory as an array of bytes, you are putting a lot of pressure on the web server. Instead of storing the entire file data in an array of bytes, you should try writing the file stream into the reponse stream in chunks. Pseudo example: context.Response.Buffer = false; byte[] buffer = new byte[4096]; int bytesRead = 0; ...


6

More than one worker process is a "web garden." In-process session state will not work correctly. You'll need to use either a single worker process for your web app, or use a session state server, or SQL Server for session state.


5

First concept to change: if you're using ASP.NET, they are ASP.NET threads, not IIS threads. Second, this is a .NET issue. static variables are shared throughout the AppDomain in .NET. Since you'll have one AppDomain per IIS application (more or less), that means your static variables will be shared across all worker threads in the application. There will ...


5

This gets the process id System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess().Id


5

A lost update won't occur in the situation you describe, but it won't work properly either. What will happen in the example you've given above is that given (say) 10 workers started simultaneously, all 10 of them will execute the subquery and get the same ID. They will all attempt to lock that ID. One of them will succeed; the others will block on the first ...


4

check the section on troubleshooting memory bottlenecks in Tuning .NET Application Performance


4

If session is stored in-proc then YES worker process recycle will remove it. Use Out-of-proc model or sql server to store session value if you want to keep it stored.


4

This depends on how your worker process recycling is configured. There are several ways to configure it and each one has different implications. Elapsed Time: In this mode the process will recycle after a period of time no matter how many requests come in After a request threshold is reached On Demand through the IIS Manager Tool You can find detailed ...


4

Read the Fine Manual in particular, Configuring Worker Processes for Recycling (IIS 6.0)


4

I've been helping a friend who's working on a project that involves a Gearman-based queue that will dispatch various asynchronous jobs to various PHP and C daemons on a pool of several servers. The workers have been designed to behave just like classic unix/linux daemons, thanks to simple shell scripts in /etc/init.d/, and commands like : invoke-rc.d ...


4

I would suggest running perfmon for a 24 hours and see if you can determine what resources are being used. Indeed they might already be running on all cores . . . Also, if their web app is a heavily threaded system, then it will take full advantage of multiple cores(at least ours does). Threads, not worker processes, are what actually count for processor ...


4

I don't believe you can ( unless you can get those IIS workers to use objects in shared memory somehow ). This is a scope issue. Your singleton instance uses process space as its scope. And like you've said, your implementation now spans multiple processes. By definition, on most operating systems, singletons will be tied to a certain process-space, ...


4

Make a Procfile in your project, and put the rake task within it like so worker: bundle exec rake my:cool:rake_task More info here: https://devcenter.heroku.com/articles/procfile UPDATE (April 2014): If you want to schedule your rake task like a cron job you could use the Heroku Scheduler Details are here: ...


3

I may be wrong, but as far as I know, by default you only have 1 worker process per application domain with multiple worker threads to handle requests. In this case In-Proc Session State should work just fine (the default settings). But if you do have multiple worker processes (not just worker threads, actual worker processes) you do need out of process ...


3

http://www.jetbrains.com/profiler/


3

I think in the following post nicholas did explain the same scenario. Please go thgrough it asp.net 2.0 cache api will not work for web garden. You have do some third party caching mechanism. http://nicholas.piasecki.name/blog/2009/02/on-web-gardens-aspnet-and-iis-60/ Another good discussion about cache in web garden is the following: ...


3

The guidelines here are pretty good: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms998549.aspx


3

I agree with Smirkin's response - updating a second folder and changing the IIS home directory to point to the other folder. Another advantage to this is that you have an easy rollback path (just switch the IIS home directory back). I've written a post with a script on how to do this using Powershell - hope it helps: ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible