Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

Stop. Right now. Before you do anything, learn basic MVVM. WPF is not WinForms (or its Java equivalent). You shouldn't be programmatically altering the UI until you know when you should do that. Those buttons should represent data. That data should be in your view model somewhere. Then you would have an ItemsControl like this: <ItemsControl ...


2

Try using attached behavior which lets you bind the WindowStartupLocation property: namespace YourProject.PropertiesExtension { public static class WindowExt { public static readonly DependencyProperty WindowStartupLocationProperty; public static void SetWindowStartupLocation(DependencyObject DepObject, WindowStartupLocation value) ...


2

I can think of two ways off the top of my head: 1) Use a converter to simply return the value of LocalApplicationData 2) Create a custom markup extension to bind to: http://10rem.net/blog/2011/03/09/creating-a-custom-markup-extension-in-wpf-and-soon-silverlight I would doubt that you can do this directly in XAML without any 'extra' code required, but if ...


2

This should work private void Button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { lista.Add(new Lista() { Hexnumber_op_Code = "1D", Background_OP_Code = "hallo", OP_Code = "red" }); lista.Add(new Lista() { Hexnumber_op_Code = "1D", Background_OP_Code = "hallo", OP_Code = "red" }); } Quoting from MSDN [ ...


2

You should put the initialization code after InitializeComponent and getting the measurements in the Loaded event like this: public Window2() { InitializeComponent(); for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) { RowDefinition rowDef = new RowDefinition(); rowDef.Height = new GridLength(1, GridUnitType.Star); ...


2

The code as-is is asynchronous with respect to the UI thread; what you're asking about it concurrency. Any kind of complex I/O work is best done with async/await, so I'm going to throw out your background worker and just use straight async. First, the button handler will handle its own enabling/disabling and executing the main download: private async void ...


2

From MSDN: [..] different Random objects that are created in close succession by a call to the default constructor will have identical default seed values and, therefore, will produce identical sets of random numbers. This problem can be avoided by using a single Random object to generate all random numbers.


2

Here's what finally worked for me: uint VisibleRows = 0; var TicketGrid = (DataGrid) MyWindow.FindName("TicketGrid"); foreach(var Item in TicketGrid.Items) { var Row = (DataGridRow) TicketGrid.ItemContainerGenerator.ContainerFromItem(Item); if(Row != null) { /* This is the magic line! We measure the Y position of the Row, ...


2

Yes, its possible. However, because you have multiple bindings, you need to bind to a MultiBinding (MSDN). Your binding looks like: <TextBlock.Text> <MultiBinding Converter="{StaticResource NameConverter}"> <Binding Path="FirstName"/> <Binding Path="LastName"/> </MultiBinding> </TextBlock.Text> ...


2

You seem to have confused the ItemContainerStyle, which is a Style with a DataTemplate that could be used in the ItemTemplate property. The former is the Style for the container, or in your case the MenuItem, whereas the actual data items should be defined with a DataTemplate. You could achieve your requirements just using DataTemplates and a ...


2

You should set the HorizontalContentAlignment not the HorizontalAlignment. <Style BasedOn="{StaticResource MetroDataGridColumnHeader}" TargetType="{x:Type DataGridColumnHeader}" x:Key="RightAlignmentMetroDataGridColumnHeader"> <Setter Property="HorizontalContentAlignment" Value="Right" /> </Style> Hope ...


1

Why make things difficult for yourself? This is WPF and MVVM, so you simply split your original collection into however many data sources you need. Just define a collection property for each ItemsSource and populate them when you access the data for your original data collection. Then you simply data bind each property to their related ItemSource property. ...


1

First, you need to inherit your own mainwindow, then add the Q_OBJECT macro and a signals section: class myMainWindow : public QMainWindow { Q_OBJECT signals: void mySignal(bool someValue); } When you want to signal to be executed in your window code, you'd use emit mySignal(true); // or false.... Then, you connect as usual: ...


1

I don't know whether you use the MVVM pattern. if you do just define a property in your ViewModel public string Someinfo { get { return string.Format("First Name = {0}, Last Name = {1}",firstName, lastName);} } and then use a Binding in your Xaml <TextBlock Text={Binding Path Someinfo} /> I would say this is 'cleaner' than doing that in your ...


1

yes it possible public string SomeInfo { get; set; } public MainWindow() { InitializeComponent(); SomeInfo = GetFirstNameAndLastNameFromDataBase(); DataContext = this; } private string GetFirstNameAndLastNameFromDataBase() { string firstName = "firstName"; ...


1

It's quite subtle. Right click next to icon ... select Show Colors Window.


1

You can try: // consider this: // ObservableCollection<...> myCollection = ... // then var view = CollectionViewSource.GetDefaultView(myCollection); view.GroupDescriptions.Add(new PropertyGroupDescription("Group1")); view.SortDescriptions.Add(new SortDescription("Group1", ListSortDirection.Ascending)); MyDataGrid.ItemsSource = myCollection; Your ...


1

Assuming that both instances of the ViewModel are available as properties in the Data Context of the containing view, then you would do it like this: <myownlocation:Constructor DataContext="{Binding ViewModelA}" /> <myownlocation:Constructor DataContext="{Binding ViewModelB}" />


1

The second parameter of the DelegateCommand constructor is a Func that tells if the Command is executable. WPF uses this to determine if buttons, etc should be enabled. I would check your IsValid Func / method whether it works okay, that is: returns true.


1

Like Nuke suggests, new your Random object outside the for loop so it's only instantiated once, and then pass the same one in each time. Random rnd = new Random(); for (int i = 0; i < 25; i++) { ... shape.Fill = PickRandomBrush(rnd); ... } Then edit your PickRandomBrush method to look like, private Brush PickRandomBrush(Random rnd) { Brush result = ...


1

string input = value.ToString().Replace(",", "."), System.Globalization.CultureInfo.InvariantCulture); double number; bool result = Double.TryParse(input , out number); if (result) { return number; } else { return input; }


1

i gave you a general answer: within a "real(a usercontrol you wanna use with different viewmodels with different property names)" usercontrol you bind just to your own DependencyProperties and you do that with ElementName or RelativeSource binding and you should never set the DataContext within a UserControl. <UserControl x:Name="myRealUC" ...


1

Are you looking for something like this? Flow Document And here is a similar question i found. Wrapping text around an image or linking two TextBlocks in C# WPF


1

You can add your code inside overridden method OnRenderSizeChanged() as follow's protected override void OnRenderSizeChanged(SizeChangedInfo sizeInfo) { base.OnRenderSizeChanged(sizeInfo); ////Here put your code. }



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible