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6

List.Add() is a method not a property: LoggedUsers.Add(tmp); LoggedUsers.Add(returned);


5

The easy answer is to just use the stock WPF application project instead of rolling your own, as its generated code handles this for you. The longer answer is to utilize Application.Run explicitly. You can see what the framework does in this answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/2694710/1783619 This keeps a long-running thread so that your application will ...


4

From MSDN: Because the current WPF implementation of the XAML processor behavior for property setting bypasses the wrappers entirely, you should not put any additional logic into the set definitions of the wrapper for your custom dependency property. If you put such logic in the set definition, then the logic will not be executed when the ...


3

EDITED FOR COMPLETE WORKING SOLUTION: XAML: <Window x:Class="delete.MainWindow" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525"> <Grid> <ComboBox Height="30" Width="300" ...


3

This will work : <dxb:BarButtonItem Name="abtn" BarItemDisplayMode="Content" ItemClick="ItemClick"> <dxb:BarButtonItem.ContentTemplate> <DataTemplate> <TextBlock> See New Items<LineBreak/> Added to Stocks </DataTemplate> </dxb:BarButtonItem.ContentTemplate> </dxb:BarButtonItem>


2

You can calculate that value from the IScrollInfo Interface. The ScrollViewer Class implements this interface and exposes the relevant properties that you need to use. As far as I can remember, you need to utilise three properties: ExtentHeight - Gets a value that contains the vertical size of the extent. ViewportHeight - Gets a value that ...


1

You can bind the MaxHeight property of your lower content grid to the ActualHeight of the buttons StackPanel. Futher more, you need to set the VerticalAlignment of the buttons panel to Bottom. This way, you can add more parts in vertically, but still stick to the buttons panel height. <Grid> <Grid.RowDefinitions> <RowDefinition ...


1

You just need to data bind the ActualHeight of your StackPanel to the ListView.Height so that the ListView won't grow larger than the Button's StackPanel: <Grid> <Grid.RowDefinitions> <RowDefinition Height="*" /> <RowDefinition Height="Auto" /> </Grid.RowDefinitions> <Grid Grid.Row="1"> ...


1

Provided that you're targeting at least VS 2012 and .NET 4.5, async/await is the way to go. Note the lack of SynchronizationContext reference - it's captured under the covers before the await, and posted back to once the async operation has completed. public async Task Login(string userName, Action<bool> callback) { // The delegate passed to ...


1

You could add a simple ContentPresenter: <ControlTemplate TargetType="controls:ModernVerticalMenu"> <Grid> <ContentPresenter Content="{TemplateBinding Menu}"/> </Grid> </ControlTemplate>


1

It should be <TextBlock Text="{Binding}"/> which is equivalent to <TextBlock Text="{Binding Path=.}"/> See the Remarks section on the Binding.Path MSDN page for further details.


1

Assuming that DataContext is set accordingly you should use ObservableCollection<T>, which implements INotifyCollectionChanged interface, if you want to see changes to a collection reflected in the UI and you cannot bind to fields so list_match should be a public property public ObservableCollection<string> list_match { get; set; } EDIT Lets ...


1

Instead of using a DataGridTextColumn you will require Template column to display Image within this Column and apply your binding in this template column only. let me show you the way Your datagrid should be like this <DataGrid x:Name="DonneesBrutes" IsReadOnly="True" ItemsSource="{Binding Path=ResultatCollectionGrande}" Margin="10,65,0,0" ...


1

Do you actually see memory pressure when you run your program? I found that Bitmap-related classes throw OutOfMemoryException in cases that don't have much to do with being out of memory. It is even documented: Image.FromFile throws OOM if the file format is supported.. Perhaps occasionally there really is a corrupt image in the stream that causes it to ...


1

I suspect there is a subtle difference between the visual trees of your test project and your production project that is interfering with the command routing. Routed Commands search for command handlers along the visual tree, and up to two paths may be taken. From this MSDN Magazine article: Usually, a command invoker looks for a command binding ...


1

How about not using the expander control? Xaml: <StackPanel> <DataGrid ItemsSource="{Binding}" AutoGenerateColumns="False" x:Name="MyDataGrid"> <DataGrid.Columns> <DataGridTextColumn Header="First Name" Binding="{Binding ...


1

Create a new WPF application / project: In Visual Studio do: File -> New -> Project -> Visual C# -> WPF application


1

The WPF databinding system modifies DependencyProperties directly through SetValue(), without going through your property setter (which doesn't actually need to exist). To see changes, add a callback in the UIPropertyMetadata.


1

You have to create a custom template for your Menu to achieve your goal. Here is the default ControlTemplate for Menu, I think the easiest way is to start from that. You will have to add HorizontalOffset and VerticalOffset for the PopUp in the TopLevelHeader template, so you can align it to your needs (or simply set Placement to Right - which is easier in ...


1

You are setting Background directly on the Border. This is called a local value, and a local value takes precedence over a value set by any other source, including style/template triggers and setters. Try removing Background="{StaticResource Gradient3}" from the Border declaration, add a Setter to your Style to set the default background: ...


1

Unfortunately, you simply can't re-open a Window after it has been closed. However, you can 'pretend' that you can and use a little deception... instead of closing the Window in the first place, you could simply hide it, as it can be hidden and re-displayed any number of times: YourWindow.Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed; You could improve this situation ...


1

I don't think that there are any best practices for this. You need to write a mini-framework that could do one of the things listed bellow: [If using MVVM] You could put the labels on your view model and bind to them in XAML. Involves writing lots of properties even when using snippets. Also, lots of properties are a pain when binding. [If using MVVM] A ...



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