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5

Use Task.Delay to execute some code after a period of time. private async void Button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { InitializeComponent(); Random rand = new Random(); for (i = 0; i <= 30; i++) { rnd = rand.Next(1,10); value += i + rnd; display.Content = value; await ...


2

try this It works for me to center the header without any issue. <DataGridTemplateColumn.HeaderStyle> <Style TargetType="DataGridColumnHeader"> <Setter Property="HorizontalContentAlignment" Value="Center"/> </Style> </DataGridTemplateColumn.HeaderStyle>


2

There are a number of way to achieve what you want, depending on your chosen UI control. For example, if you had an ObservableCollection<SomeInterface> collection containing a number of different classes that have implemented that interface, then you could display them all in a collection control. However, if you chose to use a DataGrid with ...


2

There are many ways of passing a view model to a view, as you call it, or setting a view model as the DataContext of either a Window or UserControl, as others may call it. The simplest is just this: In a view constructor: public partial class SomeView { InitializeComponent(); DataContext = new SomeViewModel(); } A more MVVM way might be to define ...


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Hi thi is working just fine here, I had to add some colors you were missing, which will make your eyes bleed pardon that, but I'm in a bit of a rush here :) <!-- nice colors you were missing them ;) --> <SolidColorBrush x:Key="BrushBorder" Color="Blue"/> <SolidColorBrush x:Key="TextBoxContextMenu" Color="DeepPink"/> <SolidColorBrush ...


2

The right way to handle DependencyProperty changes is to: . Declare the DependencyProperty: public static DependencyProperty MyXProperty; . Create the public get/set Property: public string MyX { get { return (string)GetValue(MyXProperty); } //Supposing that the property type is string set { SetValue(MyXProperty, value); } } . Register the ...


1

If I have not misunderstood your question Try this Room.cs public class Room { public uint ID { get; set; } public string Name { get; set; } public string Master { get; set; } public short MaxConnectorNum { get; set; } public bool IsNeedPassword { get; set; } } xaml <Window.Resources> <Style ...


1

Half of the answer is in Clemens' link in the comments above, and this is the whole answer: First, you need to reference GetSystemMetrics in USER32, so you can get the physical screen dimensions: public static int SM_CXSCREEN = 0; // GetSystemMetrics index. [DllImport("USER32.DLL", SetLastError = true)] public static extern int GetSystemMetrics(int ...


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Using a period path ("Path=.") will bind to the current source :) You can read the docs here under remarks seccion (last point)


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usually . refers to the preceding object and allow you to point to the sub properties, you may consider it as a separator as well. as mentioned in the question there is no preceding object so in this case the . refers to the DataContext itself and so Binding="{Binding Path=DataBinded}" and Binding="{Binding Path=.DataBinded}" are equal you may consider the ...


1

You're living in the past with all that WinForms-looking code... this is WPF! First, you don't need any FormattedText objects as you can do this all in XAML very easily. Take this basic example: <TextBlock Name="TextBlockToGetImageFrom"> <Run FontFamily="Arial" FontWeight="Bold" FontSize="40" Foreground="Red" Text="W" /> <Run ...


1

The object you create with new at this line this.DriveSelection_SelectionChanged = new DriveInfo(this.root); isn't contained in the FixedDrivers list you databind to ItemsSource. If you select one of the items in the FixedDrivers the right item will be selected var selectedItem = this.FixedDrives.FirstOrDefault(d => d.Name == this.Root); ...


1

since you are using anonymous type to populate the listbox, so you have left with no option then an object type to cast the SelectedItem to. other approach may include Reflection to extract the field/property values. but if you are using C# 4 or above you may leverage dynamic if (LstGroup1.SelectedIndex >= 0 && LstGroup2.SelectedIndex >= ...


1

Your code very nearly works as it is. You just need to make one change: Storyboard.TargetProperty="RenderTransform.(RotateTransform.Angle)" I have tested it with just the TextBlock and can see that spinning away, so if you can't see it spinning in your DataGrid, either your Name property Binding is incorrect, or its value is not the expected "Three". ...


1

Because they are not supposed to be used by other classes, so this is default behaviour. BTW: Use commands in stead and System.Windows.Interactivity, a framework such as galasoft and follow the MVVM pattern. <UserControl.....> <UserControl.DataContext> <local:YourViewModel/> <!-- Use a viewmodel locator instead --> ...


1

You should use ObservableCollection. private ObservableCollection<PengChat3ClientSock> socketList = new ObservableCollection<PengChat3ClientSock>(); Then name combobox in XAML <ComboBox Name="SocketListComboBox" Grid.Row="0" Grid.ColumnSpan="2" Height="20"> </ComboBox> And in code (xaml.cs), in constructor ...


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Use an ObservableCollection<PengChang3ClientSock> instead of a plain list. The ObservableCollection will raise and CollectionChangedEvent when items are added or removed from the collection to notify bound controls. Set the ObservableCollection as ItemsSource of the ComboBox like <ComboBox Grid.Row="0" Grid.ColumnSpan="2" Height="20" ...


1

The calling thread cannot access this object because a different thread owns it. This is a very common error and if you had searched online, you would have found a very simple explanation. You cannot manipulate UI objects on a non UI thread. The solution is simple. Don't attempt to open a dialog Window on a non UI thread. Perhaps if you can ...


1

When automatically generating columns you can change the per-property behavior using Data Annotations, in this case specifically the BrowsableAttribute class: <Browsable(False)> Annotating your property with this will prevent a column from being generated when using the following event handler on the AutoGeneratingColumn event of the DataGrid. ...


1

"Should I just break the MVVM pattern?" Well, please consider to learn more about the pattern, to know what it is to "break it". The main purpose of this pattern is to keep responsability clear, thus to obtain testable and maintainable code. There are a lot of ressource for that as show in this question: MVVM: Tutorial from start to finish? Anyway to ...


1

You should register for value changes of State and change the background accordingly: public static readonly DependencyProperty CurrentMapProperty = DependencyProperty.Register( "State", typeof(eMap), typeof(mPolygon), new PropertyMetadata(false, OnStateChanged)); private static readonly IDictionary<eMap, ImageBrush> mapping = new ...


1

Your default ListViewItem Style in the ListView's Resources is not effective, because you explicitly set another ListViewItem Style by the ItemContainerStyle property. Just drop the default style and move the DataTrigger to the ItemContainerStyle: <ListView ...> ... <ListView.ItemContainerStyle> <Style ...


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To sum up comments you're implementing INotifyPropertyChanged interface for MoonMineral class and use ObservableCollection which will handle changes to the collection but there seems to be nothing in place to handle changes to MoonMinerals property private ObservableCollection<MoonMineral> _moonMinerals = new ObservableCollection<MoonMineral>(); ...


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cal:Action.TargetWithoutContext="{Binding Source={x:Reference xImagens} , Path=DataContext}}"> Because ContextMenu is not part of the VisualTree , you can't bind to elements in the visual tree of it's TargetPlacement. ( Though in XAML it seems like it is part of it ). you have 2 choices : {Binding Path=PlacementTarget.DataContext} or : ...


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I think your DockPanels are not really needed, instead you could use two columns in the Grid: <Grid ShowGridLines="False"> <Grid.ColumnDefinitions> <ColumnDefinition Width="Auto"/> <ColumnDefinition Width="*"/> </Grid.ColumnDefinitions> <Grid.RowDefinitions> <RowDefinition ...


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Simplest way I could think of is <Grid> <Grid.ColumnDefinitions> <ColumnDefinition Width="200" /> <ColumnDefinition Width="*" /> </Grid.ColumnDefinitions> <Grid.RowDefinitions> <RowDefinition Height="30" /> <RowDefinition Height="30" /> <RowDefinition ...



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