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4

If I understand what you are asking, I think that this extension will help you as it stops the build as soon as an error occurs. StopOnFirstBuildError


3

set your error like this, you're just changing the private member that isn't being binded to: Error="Wrong username/password!"; not _error


2

You can create a default Style for TextBox, with a Trigger on the AcceptsReturn property: <Application.Resources> <Style TargetType="TextBox"> <Style.Triggers> <Trigger Property="AcceptsReturn" Value="True"> <Setter Property="TextWrapping" Value="Wrap"/> </Trigger> ...


2

If you are able to use a pre-release version the latest (2.3.0-beta2) has the method WithLatestFrom which does exactly this. _navigate.WithLatestFrom(navigationTarget, (_, tgt) => tgt) .Subscribe(tgt => Navigation.NavigateTo(tgt)); If not you can create your own by doing: public static IObservable<TResult> WithLatestFrom<TLeft, TRight, ...


2

Blocking the UI thread will do that.... Any time you are running a long operation, you need to make sure it is on some other thread, otherwise you will be seen as "non-responsive". So, first thing is to move your loading onto another thread. Thread, BackgroundWorker and Task are all reasonable ways to do this. Then you need to marshal any UI changes back ...


2

Implement ItemTemplate and bind your Brush to Foreground property. You should implement INotifyPropertyChanged in your binding object and notify on MyColorBrush value change. <ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding MyItems}"> <ListBox.ItemTemplate> <DataTemplate> <TextBlock Text="{Binding MyText}" Foreground="{Binding ...


2

The solution for catching special keys is to use PreviewKeyDownEvent. This is because those keys are not considered to be input for some controls. Some key presses, such as the TAB, RETURN, ESC, and arrow keys, are typically ignored by some controls because they are not considered input key presses. For example, by default, a Button control ignores ...


2

I have faced similar Issue when i working my last project in your Move Event //get current touch point var currentPoint = e.GetTouchPoint(this); // calculate screen margin for grid image left var x = (currentPoint.Bounds.X - (spRetake.ActualWidth + grdImage.Margin.Left)) / grdImage.ActualWidth; var y = (currentPoint.Bounds.Y - ...


2

Don't mix UI logic in your ViewModel/Business logic. You should seperate concerns like business logic, UI logic. I suggest you to use MvvmLight Messenger facilities. Your ViewModel should publish message "there is an informational dialog to show" and appropiate view should register, listen and handle this message. Example: ViewModel public void ...


1

You have to start the worker. worker.RunWorkerAsync();


1

The link isn't working for me, so I can't see exactly what you are getting at, but I assume that you're trying to change that default blue-ish gradient. You need to override the template for the button in a style, and then you can customize it to look however you want. You can't just set the background color or use triggers to change it without overriding ...


1

As MSDN: Reasons for using a DispatcherTimer opposed to a System.Timers.Timer are that the DispatcherTimer runs on the same thread as the Dispatcher and a DispatcherPriority can be set on the DispatcherTimer. I make shorter example: XAML: <Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.MainWindow" ...


1

If your only problem with your second approach (Provide a children list of my panel that is merely a wrapper around the children list of the inner panel) is the lack of ability to bind to the inner panel's controls by name, then the soluton would be: public DependencyObject this[string childName] { get { return ...


1

That's because gridOrderDetails is not a Resource. Resources are defined as such in Resource dictionaries, gridOrderDetails is just a control inside a Template. Try to use the function that answered this question instead: private void EditButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { try { DBDataContext dbContext = new DBDataContext(); ...


1

Here is some sample code for how to accomplish this: XAML: <Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.MainWindow" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525"> <Grid> <StackPanel> <ComboBox x:Name="cb1" ...


1

Another approach might be to create a custom implementation of a TabControl that exposes a new dependency property: TabPanelActualHeight. This assumes you're using the default control template, but should also work for any template that includes a TabPanel (TabPanel isn't a required part of the TabControl template). public class CustomTabControl : ...


1

They're just using a pivot with a custom header template. This should provide some insight: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/dn997788.aspx



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